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  • The Militarization of the U.S.-Mexico Border Is Not a New Idea

    The Militarization of the U.S.-Mexico Border Is Not a New IdeaThe drug war has been the catalyst for this effort longer than the immigration issue has


  • How to drive a robot on Mars

    How to drive a robot on MarsAround 9:30 Mars time, a message arrives from California, where it was sent 15 minutes earlier. The Curiosity rover executes the commands, moving slowly to its designated position, at a maximum speed of 35 to 110 meters (yards) per hour. Around 5 pm Martian time, it will wait for one of NASA's three satellites orbiting the planet to pass overhead.


  • Space photos show smoke smothering a burning California

    Space photos show smoke smothering a burning CaliforniaFires at opposite ends of California have smothered the Golden State in smoke.  Fall may be here, but rapidly-moving flames are still torching the exceptionally dry land, killing dozens of people in the state.  Photos captured by NASA satellites gazing down at the Earth from space show smoke blanketing hundreds of miles of the state on Friday, when northeast winds blew smoke from the deadly Camp Fire across the California.  The fire, which has burned 113,000 acres since November 8, has become the most destructive fire in state history.     Smoke-blanketed California on Nov 9., 2018.Image: NASA earthdataDown in Southern California, the Woolsey and Hill Fires have also contributed considerable amounts of smoke.  The Woolsey Fire, which has forced tens of thousands to evacuate from entire communities in Malibu, Thousand Oaks, and Calabasas, has burned over 91,000 acres.  The Camp Fire burning on Nov. 9, 2018.Image: DigitalglobeHere, winds pushed thick clouds of smoke off the coast, over the Pacific Ocean.  California's modern wildfire woes have been stoked by the well-understood and intertwined culprits of dry, powerful seasonal winds, climate change, and mismanaged forests.  However, climate change has almost certainly played an outsized role in these recent fires, as well as California's terrible 2018 fire season.  NASA's Terra satellite captures the Woolsey (bottom) and Camp Fire on November 9, 2018.Image: nasa Earth Observatory Warming climes dry out the land — and the state has experienced some of its hottest summer months in recorded history.  Combined with sustained dry winds and little-to-no autumn rain, the vegetation and forests across much of the state are at record or near-record seasonal lows for dryness.  Pick your timescale. 1-week, 3-week, 6-week, 3-month EDDI all at record levels. Unprecedented dryness from heat, winds, low humidity & lack of precipitation. #CAwx #CampFire @hydromet_man pic.twitter.com/CB6u6VwPmf — Rob Elvington (@RobElvington) November 10, 2018 The Camp Fire, which has burned down nearly 6,500 structures while taking the lives of at least 29 people — tying the record for the most deadly fire in state history — is 25 percent contained. The Woolsey Fire is 20 percent contained, and fire-promoting winds are expected to keep blowing through Monday. WATCH: Ever wonder how the universe might end?


  • IAEA urges quick plan on Fukushima radioactive water cleanup

    IAEA urges quick plan on Fukushima radioactive water cleanupTOKYO (AP) — Experts from the International Atomic Energy Agency urged the operator of Japan's tsunami-wrecked Fukushima nuclear plant on Tuesday to urgently decide on a plan to dispose of massive amounts of treated but still radioactive water stored in tanks on the compound.


  • Michelle Obama reflects on what she wants her legacy to be: Part 6

    Michelle Obama reflects on what she wants her legacy to be: Part 6The former first lady, whose memoir, "Becoming" is out on Nov. 13, hopes that by sharing her story, she'll inspire the next generation.


  • Security Guard Shot Dead By Police Officer at Suburban Chicago Bar

    Security Guard Shot Dead By Police Officer at Suburban Chicago Bar"Everyone was screaming out, 'Security!' He was a security guard"


  • Ancient Monkey Transformed into a 'Sloth' When It Arrived in Jamaica

    Ancient Monkey Transformed into a 'Sloth' When It Arrived in JamaicaAbout 10 million years ago, a family of monkeys left the South American mainland on a cruise to Jamaica and, as is still the case for so many tourists today, swiftly fell for the lazy pace of island life. Over many generations, the primates' legs evolved for slow climbs up tropical trees, their mouths grew a few giant molars at the expense of other, tinier teeth and — apparently unburdened by natural predators — the chilled-out tree dwellers spent their days living more like sloths than monkeys. Now, a new study published Nov. 12 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences offers the first major evidence that the ancestors of Jamaica's X. mcgregori monkeys may have been accidental colonists from South America.


  • Journalists Rally Behind Veteran Philippine Journalist Facing Fresh Legal Threats

    Journalists Rally Behind Veteran Philippine Journalist Facing Fresh Legal ThreatsThe looming threat of tax evasion charges against prominent Philippine journalist Maria Ressa has prompted an outpouring of support


  • Spain wants to ban sale of petrol and diesel cars from 2040

    Spain wants to ban sale of petrol and diesel cars from 2040Spain said Tuesday it wants to outlaw the sale of new diesel and petrol cars from 2040, the latest European country to target polluting vehicles to try to cut emissions. Socialist Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez's government included the proposal in a draft document for an energy transition law which also calls for Spain to completely decarbonise its economy by 2050. The announcement comes a year after Britain and France both pledged to ban new diesel and petrol cars by 2040, while Norway is aiming to end the use of all cars running on fossil fuels by 2025.


  • President Trump Attacked Mail-In Ballots in Florida. Here Are the Facts

    President Trump Attacked Mail-In Ballots in Florida. Here Are the FactsAdvocates for overseas voters harshly criticized President Donald Trump for arguing that some mail-in ballots shouldn't be counted.


  • Greece unearths remnants of ancient city of Tenea

    Greece unearths remnants of ancient city of TeneaGreek archaeologists have discovered jewelry, dozens of coins and remnants of a housing settlement affirming the location of an ancient city thought to have been founded by survivors of the Trojan War in the 12th or 13th century BCE. Excavations close to the village of Chiliomodi in Greece's southern Peloponnese region indicated the presence of the wealthy ancient city of Tenea, the Culture Ministry said in a statement. "It is significant that the remnants of the city, the paved roads, the architectural structure, came to light," Eleni Korka, who is in charge of the dig, told Reuters.


  • China postpones lifting rhino, tiger parts ban

    China postpones lifting rhino, tiger parts banChina appeared to backtrack on a controversial decision to lift a ban on trading tiger bones and rhinoceros horns, saying it has been postponed, state media reported Monday. The State Council, China's cabinet, unexpectedly announced last month that it would allow the sale of rhino and tiger products under "special circumstances", a move conservationists likened to signing a death warrant for the endangered species. Permitted uses included scientific research, sales of cultural relics, and "medical research or in healing".


  • Here's What Smoke From the Deadly California Wildfires Looks Like From Space

    Here's What Smoke From the Deadly California Wildfires Looks Like From SpaceImages show thick plumes of wildfire smoke rising above California


  • This is heavy: The kilogram is getting an update

    This is heavy: The kilogram is getting an updateThe kilogram is getting an update. No, your bathroom scales won't suddenly become kinder and a kilo of fruit will still weigh a kilo. But the way scientists define the exact mass of a kilogram is about ...


  • Here's How to Help the Victims As Wildfires Rage Across California

    Here's How to Help the Victims As Wildfires Rage Across CaliforniaCharities are helping the hundreds of thousands of displaced Californians


  • Tens of Cat Mummies and 100 Cat Statues Found Near Ancient Egyptian Pyramid

    Tens of Cat Mummies and 100 Cat Statues Found Near Ancient Egyptian PyramidAncient Egyptians seem to have been "cat people," or at least cat mummy people. Researchers have dug up several mummified cats alongside about 100 wooden cat statues in a tomb complex near a pyramid built for the pharaoh Userkaf, who reigned from 2291 B.C. to 2289 B.C., the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities announced Nov. 10. The burials are located near the site of Saqqara in Egypt.


  • An Australian Woman Was Charged With Hiding Sewing Needles in Strawberries

    An Australian Woman Was Charged With Hiding Sewing Needles in StrawberriesShe is a former employee of one of the brands affected by the contamination


  • Germany hopes to kickstart EU battery-making in 2019

    Germany hopes to kickstart EU battery-making in 2019German economy minister Peter Altmaier said Tuesday Berlin would provide one billion euros ($1.3 billion) of funding for electric car battery production by 2021, as talks with companies reach an advanced stage. "In the coming months we want to create the conditions for batteries to be produced on a mass scale in Europe," Altmaier said after meeting European Union energy commissioner Maros Sefcovic in Berlin. The close ally of Chancellor Angela Merkel added that "several consortiums are in the process of forming" with talks involving firms from France, Poland, the Netherlands and Austria.


  • House Republicans Are Facing a Brain Drain of Legislative Leaders

    House Republicans Are Facing a Brain Drain of Legislative LeadersThrough retirements or losses, at least 39 current GOP chairs of committees or subcommittees won’t be in Congress next year.


  • Has a Piece of the World's Oldest Computer Been Found?

    Has a Piece of the World's Oldest Computer Been Found?A lost piece of the world’s oldest analog computer (the Antikythera mechanism an ancient Greek device designed to calculate astronomical position) may have been discovered.


  • No accounting for these tastes: Artificial flavors a mystery

    No accounting for these tastes: Artificial flavors a mysteryNEW YORK (AP) — Six artificial flavors are being ordered out of the food supply in a dispute over their safety, but good luck to anyone who wants to know which cookies, candies or drinks they're in.


  • Shrinking Sea of Galilee has some hoping for a miracle

    Shrinking Sea of Galilee has some hoping for a miracleIt was not so long ago when swimmers at Ein Gev would lay out their towels in the grass at the edge of the Sea of Galilee. "Every time we come we feel an ache in our hearts," said Yael Lichi, 47, who has been visiting the famous lake with her family for 15 years. "The lake is a symbol in Israel.


  • Pilots Say Boeing Didn't Tell Them About a Safety Feature Tied to a Deadly Crash

    Pilots Say Boeing Didn't Tell Them About a Safety Feature Tied to a Deadly CrashIt may have contributed to a disaster that killed 189 people


  • Canada Is in Talks With Pakistan to Grant Asylum to Christian Woman Asia Bibi

    Canada Is in Talks With Pakistan to Grant Asylum to Christian Woman Asia BibiThe overturning of Bibi's blasphemy conviction sparked widespread unrest which has prevented her from leaving the country


  • Michelle Obama surprises students in a dance class at her former high school: Part 5

    Michelle Obama surprises students in a dance class at her former high school: Part 5The former first lady visits her alma mater, Whitney Young High School, where she said, "You were encouraged to work hard here and to excel... So I felt free here."


  • North America's Oldest Mummy Sheds Light on Ancient Migrations

    North America's Oldest Mummy Sheds Light on Ancient MigrationsNow, his mummy is helping scientists fill in the fuzzy picture of how humans first migrated into the Americas. Scientists have sequenced the genome of the Spirit Cave Mummy — the oldest human mummy found in North America — along with 14 other ancient individuals from the Americas. The genome revealed the mummy's Native American ancestry, which has allowed his living descendants to properly bury him.


  • Modest warming risks 'irreversible' ice sheet loss, study warns

    Modest warming risks 'irreversible' ice sheet loss, study warnsEven modest temperature rises agreed under an international plan to limit climate disaster could see the ice caps melt enough this century for their loss to be "irreversible", experts warned Monday. Scientists have known for decades that the ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica are shrinking, but it had been assumed that they would survive a 1.5-2C temperature rise relatively intact. "We say that 1.5-2C is close to the limit for which more dramatic effects may be expected from the ice sheets," Frank Pattyn, head of the department of geosciences, Free University of Brussels and lead study author, told AFP.


  • President Trump Blasts Saudi Arabia Over Oil Production as Relations Strain

    President Trump Blasts Saudi Arabia Over Oil Production as Relations StrainTrump is eager to tamp down threats to the economy


  • Set your alarm: Rocket launch to be visible over East Coast before dawn Thursday

    Set your alarm: Rocket launch to be visible over East Coast before dawn ThursdayA rocket will streak across the sky over the mid-Atlantic early Thursday morning as NASA launches a spacecraft from the Virginia coast.


  • State says permit for refinery near national park justified

    State says permit for refinery near national park justifiedBISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — North Dakota's Health Department did not improperly discount its own concerns about pollution from a proposed oil refinery near Theodore Roosevelt National Park when it permitted the project earlier this year, attorneys for the agency and for the developer argue.


  • Venice flooding is getting worse – and the city's grand plan won't save it

    Venice flooding is getting worse – and the city's grand plan won't save itVenice is set to be regularly 70% underwater and proposed tidal floodgates won't deal with the fundamental problems.


  • A Paradise Resident on Her Narrow Escape From California's Deadly Camp Fire – and Why Many Waited Too Long to Leave

    A Paradise Resident on Her Narrow Escape From California's Deadly Camp Fire – and Why Many Waited Too Long to LeaveLisa Vasquez, a lifelong Paradise, Calif. resident, describes her harrowing escape from the Camp Fire that killed 29 of her neighbors.


  • Amnesty Rescinds Aung San Suu Kyi's Award Over Her 'Shameful Betrayal'

    Amnesty Rescinds Aung San Suu Kyi's Award Over Her 'Shameful Betrayal'The rights group said Myanmar's leader has failed to speak out about atrocities against the Rohingya


  • Police Have Arrested the Ross From Friends Lookalike After Much Hilarity

    Police Have Arrested the Ross From Friends Lookalike After Much HilarityBritish police searching for a man bearing a striking resemblance to Ross Geller from Friends say they have made an arrest.


  • Women really are more empathetic and men more analytical, biggest ever study shows 

    Women really are more empathetic and men more analytical, biggest ever study shows If you often sit on a train pondering how the rail networks are coordinated then you are more likely to be male, new research suggests. Likewise if friends often come to you with their problems, then chances are you’re a woman. In the biggest ever study examining differences between the sexes, scientists have concluded that women really are more empathetic while men are more analytical and logical. Researchers at the University of Cambridge tested more than 680,000 people and found that on average women have a greater ability to recognise what another person is thinking intuitively and respond appropriately. On the other hand men have a stronger drive to view the world through ‘rule-based systems’, striving to learn how things work through their underlying parts. The study found that the traits can even predict which professions people choose, with those working in science, technology engineering and mathematics (Stem) scoring more highly in ‘systemizing’ or masculine traits, while those in non-stem jobs more likely to have ‘empathetic’ or feminine traits. Dr Varun Warrier, from the Cambridge team, said: “These sex differences in the typical population are very clear. “We confirmed that typical females on average are more empathic, typical males on average are more systems-oriented. “We know from related studies that individual differences in empathy and systemizing are partly genetic, partly influenced by our prenatal hormonal exposure, and partly due to environmental experience. “We need to investigate the extent to which these observed sex differences are due to each of these factors, and how these interact.” How systems-focused are you? For the study, men and women were asked to respond to 20 statements measuring their level of empathy and systems-oriented thinking. Sentences included “I am interested in knowing the path a river takes from its source to the sea” and “I can easily work out what another person might want to talk about.” On average men scored 9.87 out of 20 for empathy while women scored 10.79. Likewise for systems based thinking men scored 6.73 while women scored 5.45. The research, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), also showed that people with autism are far more likely to display ‘masculinized’ traits and less likely to score highly for empathy, a phenomenon dubbed ‘the Extreme Male Brain Theory.’ ‘Extreme Male Brain Theory’ and theory of sex differentiation were first proposed by Professor Simon Baron-Cohen, Director of the Autism Research Centre at Cambridge, nearly two decades ago but in the past is has been branded as ‘neurosexism’ by critics. The researchers said the huge study backed his claim that there really are fundamental differences between the minds of men and women at population level, although individuals can still be ‘atypical’ for their sex. “This research provides strong support for both theories,” said Prof Baron-Cohen. “This study also pinpoints some of the qualities autistic people bring to neurodiversity. “They are, on average, strong systemizers, meaning they have excellent pattern-recognition skills, excellent attention to detail, and an aptitude in understanding how things work. “We must support their talents so they achieve their potential – and society benefits too.” If you'd like to complete these measures and participate in studies at the Autism Research Centre please register here: http://www. cambridgepsychology.com


  • Algorithm that identifies the footprint of the palm of the hand is developed

    Algorithm that identifies the footprint of the palm of the hand is developedMexico, Nov. 12 (Notimex).- Mexican scientists developed an algorithm that identifies the palmar footprint, and patented this innovation in Spain with the collaboration of the University of Canarias. The project is the result of the doctoral thesis of Miguel Ángel Medina Pérez, from the National Institute of Astrophysics, Optics and Electronics (INAOE, for its acronym in Spanish), and had the academic support of Leopoldo Altamirano Robles, general director of this institute, reported the National Science Council and Technology (Concyt, for its acronym in Spanish), through its information agency. "Normally one identifies himself with fingerprints, but even when they have a high percentage of confidence, there is always a range of uncertainty," Altamirano Robles explained in an interview. The palm of the hand is one more of these data used by governments, banks, companies and organizations around the world to recognize people, according to the specialist. Algorithms exist for the identification of the palmar fingerprint, but in this new scientific work "we wanted to enter into that dynamic and develop a new one that recognizes the footprint of the palm of the hand". The researcher in Computational Sciences added that in this area it is not enough to create a new algorithm, but to be among the first ten worldwide "to be worth and be taken into account." He considered that in the field of biometrics, there are elements that can contribute to the recognition of people. "You can use the way they walk or their faces. It is almost resolved that you show your photo and identify yourself. The problem now is that a system recognizes you, for example, when you walk in a hallway without seeing the camera and without controlled lighting; there is the problem," he explained. The specialists reported that they work in a system that in addition to identifying the face of a person, can determine their activity, a system that can differentiate if someone is greeting someone else, or is at risk. "This has security applications, we are working in that direction," he explained. NTX/MSG/JCG


  • In Yemen, Trump's 'America First' Has Morphed Into 'Saudi First'

    In Yemen, Trump's 'America First' Has Morphed Into 'Saudi First'When it comes to Yemen, the U.S. remains at the beck and call of Saudi Arabia, writes Wardah Khalid.


  • An Investor's Guide to Space

    An Investor's Guide to SpaceAmerica is falling behind on space technology, and the industry is poised for growth as the Department of Defense works to change that.


  • CIA considered potential truth serum for terror suspects

    CIA considered potential truth serum for terror suspectsShortly after 9/11, the CIA considered using a drug it thought might work like a truth serum and force terror suspects to give up information about potential attacks. After months of research, the agency decided that a drug called Versed, a sedative often prescribed to reduce anxiety, was "possibly worth a try." But in the end, the CIA decided not to ask government lawyers to approve its use. The existence of the drug research program — dubbed "Project Medication" — is disclosed in a once-classified report that was provided to the American Civil Liberties Union under a judge's order and was released by the organization Tuesday.


  • This Membrane Can Reduce the Stink of Poop and Heal Wounds

    This Membrane Can Reduce the Stink of Poop and Heal WoundsA revolutionary new filter works in reverse of how we think they work, letting the small stuff in to keep the big stuff out.


  • Why the U.S. and Britain Went Back to War Just a Few Decades After the Revolution

    Why the U.S. and Britain Went Back to War Just a Few Decades After the RevolutionRead an excerpt from 'Heirs of the Founders' by H.W. Brands


  • The 2018 Elections Saw Record Midterm Turnout

    The 2018 Elections Saw Record Midterm TurnoutThe Nov. 6 elections had the highest number of votes in a non-presidential election in U.S. history


  • Here's Why Tide Detergent Is Going to Come in a Shoe Box

    Here's Why Tide Detergent Is Going to Come in a Shoe BoxForget about Tide Pods


  • Neanderthals were no more violent than modern humans, study suggests

    Neanderthals were no more violent than modern humans, study suggestsThe rehabilitation of Neanderthals has taken another step forward after scientists discovered they were no more violent than modern humans and could probably hunt just as well. Previously, studies of Neanderthal skulls showed high rates of head injuries suggesting they were constantly getting into scrapes with large animals, and each other. The evidence seemed to imply they had chaotic social structures, leading to violent infighting and such poor hunting techniques - relying on close contact weapons - that they were often mauled by cave bears or hyenas. But a review of the evidence has shown modern man had a similar numbers of wounds, showing their lifestyles were probably quite similar. “Our findings refute the hypothesis that Neanderthals were more prone to head injuries than modern humans,” said Professor Katerina Harvati, of the Institute of Evolution and Ecology, University of Tubingen in Germany. “We therefore believe that the commonly cited Neanderthal behaviors leading to high injury levels, such as violent behavior and inferior hunting capabilities, must be reconsidered. “Overall, however, our results suggest that Neanderthal lifestyles were not more dangerous than those of our ancestors, early modern Europeans.” Neanderthals are commonly thought to have relied on dangerous close range hunting techniques, using non-projectile weapons like the thrusting spears depicted here. Credit: Gleiver Prieto & Katerina Harvati Neanderthals, lived in western Eurasia from 400,000 until they were wiped out around 40,000 years ago allowing modern humans to flourish. It was widely believed that humans simply outcompeted them, but the new study suggests a different reason could be to blame. Researchers trawled through a newly compiled database of more than 800 fossil specimens, which included 114 human skulls and 90 Neanderthals,  both with and without injuries. They carried out rigorous statistical modelling accounting for sex, age at death, geography and state of preservation of the bones. Results showed that males were more frequently injured than females among both Neanderthals and early modern humans, suggesting a division of labour. But there was no difference in the frequency of fractures. Neanderthal (left) and modern human skeleton. Neanderthals have commonly be considered to show high incidences of trauma compared to modern humans. Credit: Ian Tattersall The only difference discovered was the age of the injuries, with greater skull wounds among young Neanderthal skeletons, under the age of 30,  whereas Upper Palaeolithic modern humans maintained consistent injury rates across age “This could mean that Neanderthals were more likely to be injured at a younger age than Upper Paleolithic modern humans,” added Judith Beier, of Tubingen University, first author of the study. The research was published in the journal Nature. Writing in a linked editorial Marta Lahr of Cambridge University said: "This implies that Neanderthal trauma does not require its own special explanations, and that risk and danger were as much a part of the life of Neanderthals as they were of our own evolutionary past. "The result adds to growing evidence that Neanderthals had much in common with early human groups."


  • Edited Transcript of MBLX earnings conference call or presentation 8-Nov-18 9:30pm GMT

    Edited Transcript of MBLX earnings conference call or presentation 8-Nov-18 9:30pm GMTQ3 2018 Yield10 Bioscience Inc Earnings Call


  • African-American Veterans Hoped Their Service in World War I Would Secure Their Rights at Home. It Didn't

    African-American Veterans Hoped Their Service in World War I Would Secure Their Rights at Home. It Didn'tBlack people emerged from the war bloodied and scarred. Nevertheless, the war marked a turning point in their struggles for freedom


  • A Major Beer Battle Is Brewing and it Could Mean the End of PBR

    A Major Beer Battle Is Brewing and it Could Mean the End of PBRPabst is going to court to preserve a longstanding agreement with MillerCoors


  • California wildfires hit Hollywood celebrities, too

    California wildfires hit Hollywood celebrities, tooAs wildfires rage these days in southern California, burning glitzy towns like Malibu, the roster of evacuees reads like the guest list at the Oscars. While the so-called Camp Fire in the north has exacted a devastating human toll of 42 lives so far and essentially erased the town of Paradise, down south the flames have killed two people whose bodies were found in a car.


  • Sri Lanka's President Says He Dissolved Parliament to Avert Violence

    Sri Lanka's President Says He Dissolved Parliament to Avert ViolenceSri Lanka’s president said he dissolved Parliament and called elections to avoid possible violence inside Parliament and around the country.


  • Matthew Whitaker's Appointment Is the First Big Test for House Democrats

    Matthew Whitaker's Appointment Is the First Big Test for House DemocratsDemocrats won't be sworn in until Jan. 3, but they're already facing a test: the future of oversight of special counsel Robert Mueller.