Science News Headlines - Yahoo News

Alle News verweisen auf die Webseite des jeweiligen Anbieters. Wenn du beim Klicken auf den Link zusätzlich die SHIFT-Taste (Internet Explorer, Opera) oder STRG-Taste (Netscape, Firefox) gedrückt hälst, kannst du die News auch in einem neuen Fenster öffnen.

  • Scientists find Earth-like planet circling sun's nearest neighbor

    The planet Proxima b orbiting the red dwarf star Proxima Centauri, the closest star to our Solar System, is seen in an undated artist's impressionScientists have discovered a planet that appears to be similar to Earth circling the star closest to the sun, potentially a major step in the quest to find out if life exists elsewhere in the universe, research published on Wednesday showed. The relative proximity of the planet, known as Proxima b, gives scientists a better chance to eventually capture an image of it, to help them establish whether it has an atmosphere and water, which is believed to be necessary for life. Future studies may reveal if any atmosphere contains tell-tale chemicals of biological life, such as methane, according to a paper published in this week's issue of the journal Nature.


  • China shows first images of Mars rover, aims for 2020 mission

    Concept portrayal of China's Mars rover and landerChina has showed off its first images of a rover it plans to sent to Mars in mid-2020, which is designed to explore the planet surface for three months, state media said, the latest aim of China's ambitious space program. China in 2003 became the third country to put a man in space with its own rocket after the former Soviet Union and the United States. It has touted its plans for moon exploration and in late 2013 completed the first lunar "soft landing" since 1976 with the Chang'e-3 craft and its Jade Rabbit rover.


  • GM mustard clears hurdle in India but more remain

    An Indian scientist holds a GM rapeseed crop under trial in New DelhiBy Mayank Bhardwaj and Krishna N. Das NEW DELHI (Reuters) - A government panel has cleared commercial use of what would be India's first genetically modified (GM) food crop, but politicians still have to give final approvals amid wide-spread public opposition. Technical clearance for indigenously developed GM mustard seeds was given on Aug. 11 by the panel of government and independent experts, following multiple reviews of crop trial data generated over almost a decade, said two sources with direct knowledge of the matter. The decision to go ahead is likely to be made public soon by the environment ministry's Genetic Engineering Approval Committee, and is expected eventually to move to Prime Minister Narendra Modi's desk via Environment Minister Anil Madhav Dave.


  • What are the origins of life? There's a rocket for that

    Artist rendering of NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft is seen in an undated handout imageBy Ben Gruber CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (Reuters) - NASA scientists are putting the finishing touches on a spacecraft designed to rendezvous with Asteroid Bennu in 2018 to find clues about the origins of life. "We are days away from encapsulating into our rocket faring and lifting this spacecraft on to the Atlas V vehicle and beginning the journey to Bennu and back," Dante Lauretta, the principal investigator of the mission told Reuters at the Kennedy Space Center. The $1 billion mission, known as OSIRIS-REx, is scheduled for launch on Sept. 8, 2016 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.


  • U.S. astronauts prepare station for commercial space taxis

    NASA astronaut Jeff Williams works inside the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module attached to the International Space StationTwo NASA astronauts completed a six-hour spacewalk outside the International Space Station on Friday to install a parking spot for upcoming commercial space taxis, which will end U.S. reliance on Russia for rides to the orbiting outpost. Station commander Jeff Williams and flight engineer Kate Rubins floated outside the station's airlock and headed toward the berthing slip once used by NASA's now-retired space shuttles, a NASA TV broadcast showed.


  • Buried Tectonic Plate Reveals Hidden Dinosaur-Era Sea

    Buried Tectonic Plate Reveals Hidden Dinosaur-Era SeaUsing images constructed from earthquake data, geoscientists have developed a method for resurrecting a "slab graveyard" of tectonic plate segments buried deep within the Earth, unfolding the deformed rock into what it may have looked like up to 52 million years ago. This helped the researchers identify the previously unknown East Asian Sea Plate, where an ancient sea once existed in the region shortly after dinosaurs went extinct. The Pacific, Indo-Australian and Eurasian plates frame several smaller plates, including the Philippine Sea Plate, which researchers say has been migrating northwest since its formation roughly 55 million years ago.


  • Deaths from Fentanyl, Drug That Killed Prince, Rise Sharply Overdose deaths from the opioid painkiller fentanyl — the same drug that killed singer-songwriter Prince in April — have increased sharply in a number of U.S. states, according to a new report. From 2013 to 2014, eight U.S. states — Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire, Ohio, Florida, Kentucky, Maryland and North Carolina — had large increases in overdose deaths tied to synthetic opioids. During that same time, the number of drug products that tested positive for fentanyl after being seized by law enforcement officers increased by more than 10 times in the eight states, rising from 293 to 3,340.
  • Why Areas with More Men Have Higher Marriage Rates The research showed that counties in the U.S. with more men than women generally had higher rates of marriage, fewer births outside marriage and fewer single female heads of household — all of which are generally signs of greater family stability, according to the researchers. "There's this numerical expectation that, as men increase in numbers, that means that there are fewer women available, so men are less likely to get married," said Ryan Schacht, the study's lead author and a postdoctoral researcher in anthropology at the University of Utah. In the study, the researchers looked at U.S. Census data from 2,800 counties in all 50 states, focusing on the relationship between each county's gender ratio (the number of men relative to women) and certain markers of family stability that researchers commonly use in research like this, such as marriage rates and the percentage of households with children who were headed by single women.
  • Spaceflight Is Entering a New Golden Age, Says Blue Origin Founder Jeff Bezos

    Spaceflight Is Entering a New Golden Age, Says Blue Origin Founder Jeff BezosEarly Monday (Nov. 23), the private spaceflight company Blue Origin made a major stride in the pursuit of fully reusable rockets, when it launched an uncrewed vehicle into space and then soft-landed the rocket booster on the ground. "It was one of the greatest moments of my life," said Jeff Bezos, Blue Origin's founder, speaking about the landing in a press briefing yesterday (Nov. 24). "And my teammates here at Blue Origin, I could see felt the same way.


  • Turkey and Football: How Astronauts Celebrate Thanksgiving in Space

    Turkey and Football: How Astronauts Celebrate Thanksgiving in SpaceThanksgiving in space will be a lot like the holiday down here on the ground — minus the gravity, of course. Like most Americans, NASA astronauts Scott Kelly and Kjell Lindgren have Thanksgiving (Nov. 26) off, and they'll spend the day aboard the International Space Station (ISS) watching football and enjoying a turkey-centric feast, agency officials said. Kelly and Lindgren gave viewers a look at that feast in a special Thanksgiving video this week, breaking out bags of smoked turkey, rehydratable corn, candied yams and potatoes au gratin.


  • Venus and Jupiter Imagined: From Galileo to Science Fiction

    Venus and Jupiter Imagined: From Galileo to Science FictionVenus and Jupiter will appear so close together in the sky this Saturday (Aug. 27) that, from some locations, the two planets will appear to almost touch. Venus and Jupiter were the first two planets to be systematically observed with telescopes. C. Krupp, director of the Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles, told Space.com.


  • SpaceX Dragon returns to Earth with station science, gear

    In this frame grab taken from NASA Television, a SpaceX Dragon capsule separates from a robotic arm of the International Space Station en route back to Earth with a load of science experiments and gear from the space station, Friday, Aug. 26, 2016. (NASA via AP)CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — A SpaceX Dragon capsule returned to Earth on Friday with scientific gifts from the International Space Station.


  • Science-Proven Way to Reduce Teen Drinking "Family rules may be a useful complement to community rules and policies" in the effort to prevent underage drinking, said Mark Wolfson, the study's lead researcher and a professor of social sciences and health policy at the Wake Forest School of Medicine in North Carolina. The researchers found that the teenagers whose parents had clear rules against underage drinking were 35 percent less likely to have attended a party where there was alcohol in the past 30 days, compared with teens whose parents did not have crystal-clear rules. Future research should examine whether parents can be coached in developing effective and appropriate rules for their children, Wolfson said.
  • Jackpot: Scientists find Earth-like planet at star next door

    This artist rendering provided by the European Southern Observatory shows a view of the surface of the planet Proxima b orbiting the red dwarf star Proxima Centauri, the closest star to the Solar System. The double star Alpha Centauri AB also appears in the image to the upper-right of Proxima itself. Proxima b is a little more massive than the Earth and orbits in the habitable zone around Proxima Centauri, where the temperature is suitable for liquid water to exist on its surface. (European Southern Observatory via AP)WASHINGTON (AP) — After scanning the vast reaches of the cosmos for Earth-like planets where life might exist, astronomers have found one right next door.


  • Scientists hope new test could help contain meningitis outbreaks By Umberto Bacchi LONDON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - A test has been developed that could help diagnose bacterial infections including meningitis in minutes, but it could take several years before a cheap testing device is available to developing countries, scientists said on Wednesday. The new test could save lives, allow treatment of disease - which is difficult to diagnose - to start much sooner and reduce the risk of life-changing after effects, an international team of researchers led by Imperial College London said. "We would very much hope this could become something cheap enough to be applied even in resource poor regions," Imperial College Professor Michael Levin told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.
  • Scientists find Earth-like planet circling sun's nearest neighbor

    The planet Proxima b orbiting the red dwarf star Proxima Centauri, the closest star to our Solar System, is seen in an undated artist's impressionThe relative proximity of the planet, known as Proxima b, gives scientists a better chance to eventually capture an image of it, to help them establish whether it has an atmosphere and water, which is believed to be necessary for life. Future studies may reveal if any atmosphere contains tell-tale chemicals of biological life, such as methane, according to a paper published in this week’s issue of the journal Nature. The planet, located about 4.2 light-years from Earth, or 25 trillion miles (40 trillion km), is the closest of some 3,500 planets that have been discovered beyond the solar system since 1995, according to the paper.


  • Scientists find Earth-like planet circling sun's nearest neighbour

    The planet Proxima b orbiting the red dwarf star Proxima Centauri, the closest star to our Solar System, is seen in an undated artist's impressionScientists have discovered a planet that appears to be similar to Earth circling the star closest to the sun, potentially a major step in the quest to find out if life exists elsewhere in the universe, research published on Wednesday showed. The relative proximity of the planet, known as Proxima b, gives scientists a better chance to eventually capture an image of it, to help them establish whether it has an atmosphere and water, which is believed to be necessary for life. Future studies may reveal if any atmosphere contains tell-tale chemicals of biological life, such as methane, according to a paper published in this week's issue of the journal Nature.


  • Scientists: Puffin chicks starving with less food available PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Atlantic puffin chicks on Machias Seal Island in the Gulf of Maine have had the worst breeding season ever recorded, with the majority of chicks starving to death in burrows, scientists said.
  • Alien Megastructure? 'Tabby's Star' Continues to Baffle Scientists

    Alien Megastructure? 'Tabby's Star' Continues to Baffle ScientistsNearly a year after first making headlines around the world, "Tabby's star" is still guarding its secrets. In September 2015, a team led by Yale University astronomer Tabetha Boyajian announced that a star about 1,500 light-years from Earth called KIC 8462852 had dimmed oddly and dramatically several times over the past few years. Boyajian and her colleagues suggested that a cloud of fragmented comets or planetary building blocks might be responsible, but other researchers noted that the signal was also consistent with a possible "alien megastructure" — perhaps a giant swarm of energy-collecting solar panels known as a Dyson sphere.


  • Eat your food packaging, don't bin it - scientists By Alex Whiting ROME (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Scientists are developing an edible form of packaging which they hope will preserve food more effectively and more sustainably than plastic film, helping to cut both food and plastic waste. The packaging film is made of a milk protein called casein, scientists from the U.S. Department of Agriculture said at a meeting of the American Chemical Society. The film looks similar to plastic wrapping, but is up to 500 times better at protecting food from oxygen, as well as being biodegradable and sustainable, the researchers said at the meeting in Pennsylvania, which runs until Thursday.
  • 'RNA World': Scientists Inch Closer to Recreating Primordial Life

    'RNA World': Scientists Inch Closer to Recreating Primordial LifeScientists studying the origin of life think that the first molecules to replicate themselves — the very first living things — lived in what is called "RNA world." The RNA world hypothesis says that before there was DNA, or deoxyribonucleic acid, there was RNA (ribonucleic acid) serving as a kind of primitive genetic material and simple enzymes. This is simpler than the protein-based chemistry that governs life today, in which the genetic material and enzymes are separate. In the new study, David Horning and Gerald Joyce, both at The Scripps Institute in La Jolla, California, mixed a cocktail of water, RNA and an enzyme called ribozyme.


  • Lochte's Lies: How Science Explains Fibbers Nearly a week after Ryan Lochte and three other U.S. swimmers claimed to have been robbed at gunpoint in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, it seems the men are admitting their story seriously bent the truth. The 12-time Olympic medalist also said he regretted taking focus away from those still competing in the Olympics, and thanked Brazil for hosting. In the swimmers' original version of events, Lochte and three fellow swimmers said their taxi was pulled over and they were robbed at gunpoint early in the morning of Aug. 14.
  • Are Black Holes Truly Black? Lab Test Supports Stephen Hawking's Theory

    Are Black Holes Truly Black? Lab Test Supports Stephen Hawking's TheoryIf Hawking radiation comes from astrophysical black holes (not just those created in a lab), it would mean these objects are not entirely dark. It could also help scientists solve a paradox posed by black holes, and perhaps shed light on one of the most significant problems facing modern physics. According to Steinhauer, earlier calculations by cosmologist Stephen Hawking (who came up with the theory that bears his name) combined the theories of quantum physics and gravity.


  • NASA Opens Research Portal for Scientists

    NASA Opens Research Portal for ScientistsNASA has a new web portal highlighting the research funded by the agency, and promises to put all its peer-reviewed studies online in less than a year. The research will be available on PubSpace, an archive maintained by the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. There is no charge to register, and the data can be downloaded and analyzed, NASA officials said.


  • Exxon, GT find way to cut carbon emissions for chemicals: Science

    The logo of Exxon Mobil Corporation is shown on a monitor above the floor of the New York Stock Exchange in New YorkExxon Mobil and Georgia Tech researchers published findings of a breakthrough in the journal Science on Thursday, saying they had devised a way to slash carbon emissions from chemicals manufacturing by using reverse osmosis instead of heat to separate molecules. Reverse osmosis, which has been widely used for decades in desalination plants that turn seawater into drinking water, has long been seen as having applications for the oil and chemicals industry. Now researchers have finally come up with a specially treated polymer that can serve as the semipermeable membrane needed to do reverse osmosis for chemicals manufacturing at room temperature.


  • Scientists to probe ways of meeting tough global warming goal By Alister Doyle OSLO (Reuters) - Scientists on Thursday set the outlines of a report on how to restrict global warming to a limit agreed last year by world leaders - even though the temperature threshold is at risk of being breached already. The U.N.-led study, due to be published in 2018 as a guide for governments, will look into ways of cutting greenhouse gas emissions to cap the rise at 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 Fahrenheit) above pre-industrial levels. Thelma Krug, a Brazilian scientist who led the four-day meeting in Geneva, said it will also cast the fight against climate change as part of a wider struggle to end poverty and ensure sustainable growth.
  • Googly-Eyed Purple Squid Sighting Delights Scientists

    Googly-Eyed Purple Squid Sighting Delights ScientistsA purple squid with eyes so googly it could easily be mistaken for a character in the movie "Finding Nemo" was recently spotted by scientists off the coast of Southern California. The so-called stubby squid (Rossia pacifica) is a species of bobtail squid native to the northern Pacific Ocean. The stubby squid's giant eyes, that "look painted on," delighted the scientists aboard the Exploration Vessel (E/V) Nautilus.


  • China Launches Pioneering 'Hack-Proof' Quantum-Communications Satellite

    China Launches Pioneering 'Hack-Proof' Quantum-Communications SatelliteChina launched the first-ever quantum satellite Monday (Aug. 15) in an effort to help develop an unhackable communications system. "In its two-year mission, QUESS is designed to establish 'hack-proof' quantum communications by transmitting uncrackable keys from space to the ground, and provide insights into the strangest phenomenon in quantum physics — quantum entanglement," China's state-run Xinhua news agency reported.


  • What's the Most Challenging Gymnastics Event, According to Physics? Fans of the Summer Olympics can't seem to get enough of American gymnast Simone Biles. Biles may make it look easy, but between all the different events that gymnasts have to master — from balance beam to the vault for women, and the pommel horse to the rings for men — what's the most challenging apparatus, according to science? For example, the physics of the pommel horse, an apparatus that male gymnasts must tackle, is easy to understand, said Jonas Contakos, a gymnastics coach with a Ph.D. in kinesiology and a master's in biomechanics.
  • NASA Is Painting Rocket and Plane Models Hot Pink … for Science

    NASA Is Painting Rocket and Plane Models Hot Pink … for ScienceTo see how new rocket and aircraft designs perform under pressure, NASA's aeronautical innovators are painting model prototypes an eye-searing hot pink for wind tunnel tests in California and Virginia. NASA engineers are using a pressure-sensitive paint (PSP) that can show — with a dazzling glow — how the surface of a rocket or aircraft model responds to pressure. NASA is conducting the tests in wind tunnels at the agency's Ames Research Center in California and Langley Research Center in Virginia.


  • UK promises to maintain EU funding for farming, science

    FILE - In this file photo dated Friday, May 13, 2016, Britain's Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond arrives at Downing Street in London. Britain's Treasury chief Philip Hammond said Saturday Aug. 13, 2016, in a funding guarantee that Britain will keep paying for European Union-funded agriculture, infrastructure and science projects even if Britain leaves the bloc. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, FILE)LONDON (AP) — The British government promised Saturday to keep paying for European Union-funded agriculture, infrastructure and science projects until 2020, even if Britain leaves the bloc before then.


  • Junk food fight: Science tests how birds compete for Cheetos

    This undated photo provided by researcher Rhea Esposito on Thursday, Aug. 11, 2016 shows a crow holding a cheese flavored snack in Jackson Hole, Wyo., during an experiment to see how two types of smart birds_ smaller magpies and bigger crows _ compete for food. Traditional bait food, nuts and seeds, were hard to see for Esposito, who would watch from about 20 feet away. The magpies turned out to be quicker and more daring. When crows learned that the orange snacks were tasty, they stole them from the magpie. (Rhea Esposito via AP)WASHINGTON (AP) — It's the early bird that gets the Cheetos. But it's the bigger bird that steals it away.


  • Why Guys Should Not Drink After Exercising Getting drunk may undo the effects of an intense workout, at least for men, new research suggests. Men in the study who drank alcohol after doing heavy strength training showed reduced levels of the chemical signals that spur muscle growth and repair compared to men who did not drink, according to a new study that will be published in a forthcoming issue of the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. "A little bit of alcohol is probably not a problem," said study co-author Jakob Vingren, a biology and kinesiology professor at the University of North Texas in Denton.
  • Ghost in the Machine: Atom Smasher's 'New Particle' Was Illusion

    Ghost in the Machine: Atom Smasher's 'New Particle' Was IllusionIn December 2015, scientists at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) — the world's largest particle accelerator — thought they may have seen a hint of a brand-new particle, and with it, a window into physics beyond what scientists know now. Yet despite the negative result, the fact that there is nothing there shows that reigning theories of particle physics are working remarkably well, experts said. "The bad news is [the measurements] don't show anything," said theoretical physicist Matt Strassler.


  • As Earth swelters, global warming target in danger of being missed

    An iceberg floats near a harbour in the town of Kulusuk, east GreenlandBy Alister Doyle OSLO (Reuters) - The Earth is so hot this year that a limit for global warming agreed by world leaders at a climate summit in Paris just a few months ago is in danger of being breached. In December, almost 200 nations agreed a radical shift away from fossil fuels with a goal of limiting a rise in average global temperatures to well below 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 Fahrenheit) above pre-industrial times while "pursuing efforts" for 1.5C (2.7F). "The future debate about temperature targets will be about overshoot." Many climate scientists say the Paris targets are likely to be breached in the coming decades, shifting debate onto whether it will be possible to turn down the global thermostat.


  • Scientists Identify 20 Alien Worlds Most Likely to Be Like Earth

    Scientists Identify 20 Alien Worlds Most Likely to Be Like EarthAn international team of researchers has identified the 20 most Earth-like worlds among the more than 4,000 exoplanet candidates that NASA's Kepler space telescope has detected to date, scientists report in a new study. All 20 potential "second Earths" lie within the habitable zones of their sun-like stars — meaning they should be able to harbor liquid water on their surfaces — and are likely rocky, the researchers said. Identifying these Earth-like planets is important in the hunt for alien life, said study lead author Stephen Kane, an associate professor of physics and astronomy at San Francisco State University (SFSU).


  • Scientists Home in on the Human 'Sociability' Gene Williams syndrome is caused by a deletion of a specific set of 25 contiguous genes on chromosome 7. The disorder affects about 1 in 10,000 people worldwide, and about 20,000 Americans currently have the condition, according to the Williams Syndrome Association, a patient-advocacy group. People with Williams syndrome tend to crave social interactions.
  • Perseid Lore: The Legend and Science Behind the Epic Meteor Shower

    Perseid Lore: The Legend and Science Behind the Epic Meteor ShowerEvery August, just when many people go vacationing in rural areas where skies are dark, the famous Perseid meteor shower  makes its appearance. In a matter of minutes, Swift ran across an object in the dim constellation of Camelopardalis, the Giraffe, which he believed to be Comet Schmidt, which had been discovered only a couple of weeks earlier.


  • Scientists Dive to WWII-Era Japanese Warship: How to Watch Live

    Scientists Dive to WWII-Era Japanese Warship: How to Watch LiveA remotely operated vehicle (ROV) will explore the wreckage of the Hayate, a destroyer in the Imperial Japanese Navy's fleet that was sunk by American forces in December 1941. The dive is part of an ongoing expedition aboard the research vessel Okeanos Explorer, a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) ship. Reserachers are currently exploring the largely uncharted deep-sea ecosystems and seafloor near the Wake Atoll Unit of the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument (PRIMNM).


  • The Science of Olympic Rivalries: Do Adversaries Help or Hurt?

    The Science of Olympic Rivalries: Do Adversaries Help or Hurt?From the decade-long swimming rivalry between Michael Phelps and Ryan Lochte, to figure skating's famous Nancy-Kerrigan-versus-Tonya-Harding contest, some Olympic matchups seem to be as much about contention between two personalities as they are about crowning a champion. At the Olympics, the stakes are higher, the audience is bigger and every contest is scrutinized down to the smallest detail. At first, a rivalry might seem like a good thing, capable of motivating both competitors to try even harder to win, experts told Live Science.