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  • Oil steady on hopes Chinese fiscal stimulus will stem economic slowdown

    Oil steady on hopes Chinese fiscal stimulus will stem economic slowdownInternational Brent crude oil futures were at $61.49 per barrel at 0314 GMT, virtually unchanged from their last close. U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures were at $52.98 per barrel, 3 cents below their last settlement. The steadier prices followed a 2-percent fall in crude futures and a slump in international financial markets on Tuesday as concerns over global growth spooked investors into looking for safe-haven assets such as government bonds or gold.


  • Each Xiaomi Share Is Now Worth Less Despite 20 Million Buyback

    Each Xiaomi Share Is Now Worth Less Despite 20 Million BuybackDilution -- or dividing the company into more pieces -- could also reduce Xiaomi’s earnings-per-share unless it cancels some repurchased shares. Xiaomi fell as much as 1.1 percent on Wednesday, before paring the drop to trade little changed.


  • 'A rock' hit the moon during the Super Blood Wolf Moon

    'A rock' hit the moon during the Super Blood Wolf MoonOn Sunday, millions of people around the world watched as the Earth’s shadow covered the moon in a copper-reddish glow in what was known as a “Super Blood Wolf Moon.” It was the first full moon of the year (a wolf moon) and it came at a time when the moon was also closest to Earth (a super moon) and going through a lunar eclipse (a blood moon). Many astronomers speculated what had happened, but one of them, Jose Maria Madiedo from the University of Huelva in Spain, quickly confirmed that it was indeed a meteorite that hit the moon. “A rock hits the moon during the total eclipse,” Madiedo tweeted on the morning of Jan. 22.


  • Beth Chapman Shares First Selfie Since Undergoing Chemotherapy: 'It's Only Hair'

    Beth Chapman Shares First Selfie Since Undergoing Chemotherapy: 'It's Only Hair'In November, the reality star found out that her throat cancer had returned.


  • Google, Facebook Set 2018 Lobbying Records as Techlash Widens

    Google, Facebook Set 2018 Lobbying Records as Techlash WidensAlphabet Inc.’s Google unit spent more than $21 million to influence Washington, according to federal disclosures, in a year when its chief executive officer, Sundar Pichai, made his first appearance before Congress. Facebook spent nearly $13 million on lobbying, the filings say, as it dealt with the fallout from privacy scandals, the congressional testimony of its chief executive officer, Mark Zuckerberg, and data vulnerabilities.


  • Jet-setting Davos elite frets about climate

    Jet-setting Davos elite frets about climateThe World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos is one of the few places where environmental activists attend the same events as the private jet crowd, and get a chance to try to convince them to change their ways face-to-face. Coming is "not for us a given, because this is a group of elites who have gotten us into the lot of messes that we have around the world right now," the environmental organisation's executive director Jennifer Morgan told AFP. Last year, US President Donald Trump came to address the WEF just months after announcing he would abandon the Paris climate agreement.


  • Country singer John Berry reveals tonsil cancer diagnosis

    Country singer John Berry reveals tonsil cancer diagnosisJohn Berry, known for songs including "Your Love Amazes Me" and "Beautifully Broken," recently had surgery to remove tumors in his tonsils.


  • Bayer asks California judge to limit evidence in another Roundup cancer trial

    Bayer asks California judge to limit evidence in another Roundup cancer trialMonsanto in a previously unreported filing on Jan. 15 asked California Superior Court Judge Winifred Smith in Oakland to split a March trial by a California couple into two phases. Under the company's proposal, lawyers for Alva and Alberta Pilliod in the initial trial phase would be barred from introducing evidence that the company allegedly attempted to influence regulators and manipulate public opinion.


  • Brexit-Backer Dyson Shifts HQ to Singapore as Asia Fuels Electric Car Dreams

    Brexit-Backer Dyson Shifts HQ to Singapore as Asia Fuels Electric Car DreamsDyson Ltd. has mushroomed in recent years, driven by a growing customer base in Asia. Jim Rowan, Dyson’s chief executive officer, said in a call with reporters that the move to Singapore was not due to tax or fears of Brexit, but to the shift in the importance of the region to the company.


  • Country Singer John Berry Diagnosed with Tonsil Cancer: 'You Don't See Fear on These Faces'

    Country Singer John Berry Diagnosed with Tonsil Cancer: 'You Don't See Fear on These Faces'John Berry Diagnosed with Tonsil Cancer: 'You Don't See Fear on These Faces'


  • Designer Igor Lobanov Is Creating the Yachts of Our Future

    Designer Igor Lobanov Is Creating the Yachts of Our FutureRussian designer Igor Lobanov shares insights on past projects and whether his studio's futuristic concepts can be realized.


  • Bleeding risks may offset aspirin's benefit vs heart disease

    Bleeding risks may offset aspirin's benefit vs heart diseaseShould healthy people take aspirin to ward off heart disease? Aspirin is a blood thinner and can help prevent clots that may lead to heart attack or stroke. "When considering the totality of evidence, cardiovascular benefits associated with aspirin were modest and equally balanced by major bleeding events," said the report in the Journal of the American Medical Association.


  • IBM Gains as Quarterly Earnings, 2019 Outlook Beat Estimates

    IBM Gains as Quarterly Earnings, 2019 Outlook Beat EstimatesIBM said it sees adjusted earnings per share of at least $13.90 in 2019. Chief Executive Officer Ginni Rometty has been touting IBM’s newer businesses in the cloud and artificial intelligence as agents for growth. “While IBM delivered a decent quarter relative to expectations, we still have reservations about the future growth prospects for the company,” Josh Olson, an analyst with Edward Jones & Co., said in a note.


  • J&J, U.S. states settle hip implant claims for $120 million

    J&J, U.S. states settle hip implant claims for $120 millionAttorneys general of 46 U.S. states announced the settlement agreement in statements on Tuesday. DePuy in a statement said the settlement involves no admission of liability or misconduct on the part of the companies. "DePuy Synthes remains committed to meeting the current and future needs of orthopedic surgeons and patients," the company said.


  • Construction without coordination: how ants build megaprojects

    Construction without coordination: how ants build megaprojectsLeaf-cutter ants build super highways to transfer food and building materials hundreds of metres without communicating with each other, scientists claimed Wednesday, in findings that could prompt a rethink about how some insect communities organise themselves. It had long been thought that the ants, which are native to south and central America, organise megaprojects by communicating with one another, assigning specialists to remove debris and retrieve leaf matter. Far from communicating individual tasks as part of an overall plan, the ants appear to manage large-scale infrastructure projects with no coordination at all.


  • Microsoft Seeks to Restrict Abuse of its Facial Recognition AI

    Microsoft Seeks to Restrict Abuse of its Facial Recognition AIThe company in December called for new legislation to govern artificial intelligence software for recognizing faces, advocating for human review and oversight of the technology in some critical cases, as a way to mitigate the risks of biased outcomes, intrusions into privacy and democratic freedoms. “We do need to lead by example and we’re working to do that,” Microsoft President and Chief Legal Officer Brad Smith said in an interview, adding that some other companies are also putting similar principles into place. It also involves setting controls for the company’s global sales and consulting teams to prevent selling the technology in cases where it risks being used for an unwanted purpose.


  • Bayer asks California judge to limit evidence in another Roundup cancer trial

    Bayer asks California judge to limit evidence in another Roundup cancer trialMonsanto in a previously unreported filing on Jan. 15 asked California Superior Court Judge Winifred Smith in Oakland to split a March trial by a California couple into two phases. Under the company's proposal, lawyers for Alva and Alberta Pilliod in the initial trial phase would be barred from introducing evidence that the company allegedly attempted to influence regulators and manipulate public opinion.


  • U.S. Still Seeking Huawei CFO's Extradition, DOJ Official Says

    U.S. Still Seeking Huawei CFO's Extradition, DOJ Official Says“We will continue to pursue the extradition of defendant Ms. Meng Wanzhou, and will meet all deadlines set by the U.S.-Canada Extradition Treaty,” department spokesman Marc Raimondi said Tuesday. Canada’s Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland, speaking to Bloomberg Television in Davos, Switzerland, said earlier in the day that Canada hasn’t asked the U.S. to drop its extradition case.


  • U.S. insulin costs per patient nearly doubled from 2012 to 2016: study

    U.S. insulin costs per patient nearly doubled from 2012 to 2016: studyA person with type 1 diabetes incurred annual insulin costs of $5,705, on average, in 2016. The average cost was roughly half that at $2,864 per patient in 2012, according to a report due to be released on Tuesday by the nonprofit Health Care Cost Institute (HCCI). The figures represent the combined amount paid by a patient and their health plan for the medicine and do not reflect rebates paid at a later date.


  • Climate Change Could Turn Earth's Aquifers Into a Time Bomb

    Climate Change Could Turn Earth's Aquifers Into a Time BombAnd we might not know until it's too late.


  • R. Kelly Hit With 66 Violations for His Sauna-Filled Recording Studio

    R. Kelly Hit With 66 Violations for His Sauna-Filled Recording Studio"Someone is living there": A Chicago judge orders R. Kelly to stop using his recording studio as a residence


  • Boxing Startup Favored by Justin Bieber Is Seeking VC Funding

    Boxing Startup Favored by Justin Bieber Is Seeking VC FundingRumble’s latest financing signals a speedy ascent for a startup that opened its doors just two years ago, offering group fitness classes under the brand Rumble Boxing. But with a loyal clientele prepared to pay as much as $36 per class, and plans for a rapid expansion, Rumble is attracting interest from venture investors, one person said. Its fast-paced classes, with lighting and music that wouldn't be out of place in a nightclub, fit into the exercise-as-entertainment trend that has fueled the growth of businesses such as Tough Mudder Inc. and SoulCycle Inc.


  • Blue Origin to make 10th flight test of space tourist rocket

    Blue Origin to make 10th flight test of space tourist rocketBlue Origin, the rocket company headed by Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, is poised to launch the 10th test flight of its unmanned New Shepard rocket on Wednesday as it competes with Virgin Galactic to become the first to carry tourists on brief visits to space. Virgin Galactic, headed by British billionaire Richard Branson, is also working on a vessel of its own to carry tourists to space. On December 13, 2018, Virgin Galactic's SpaceShipTwo, VSS Unity, flew higher than it ever had before, surpassing what the US Air Force considers the boundary of space, and marking the first manned flight to space from US soil since 2011.


  • Apple says the iPhone will be very useful after the climate apocalypse

    Apple says the iPhone will be very useful after the climate apocalypseIn the end times, when the Earth is populated solely by roving bands of marauders, at least we'll know Apple was able to find new ways to profit from the iPhone. The environmental nonprofit CDP (formerly the Carbon Disclosure Project) dropped its latest report on Tuesday, and it's very depressing. The group asked more than 7,000 companies to share the risks and opportunities that come with climate change, reported Bloomberg. And it turns out there is money to be made even in a world ravaged by drought and storms. SEE ALSO: Guess what? U.S. carbon emissions popped back up in a big way Apple notes that "as people begin to experience severe weather events with greater frequency, we expect an increasing need for confidence and preparedness in the arena of personal safety and the well-being of loved ones." Read more... More about Tech, Google, Apple, Climate Change, and Tech


  • We Asked a Doctor How Long a Cold Is Contagious, and You Guys, It's Alarming

    We Asked a Doctor How Long a Cold Is Contagious, and You Guys, It's AlarmingColds are the worst, in part because they're just so ridiculously contagious. "The 'common cold' is caused by a variety of respiratory viruses, the most common of which is the rhinovirus," John E.


  • BlackRock plans environmentally conscious money market fund

    BlackRock plans environmentally conscious money market fundBlackRock Inc is planning a new fund for investors looking to park their cash safely while helping the environment, expanding options for "socially responsible" investments, a filing with U.S. market regulators showed on Tuesday. The world's largest fund manager told the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission that it wants to launch a money-market fund that will invest primarily in debt from issuers who have better-than-average environmental practices. BlackRock, which oversees nearly $6 trillion in assets, also planned to commit 5 percent of the net revenue from its management fee on the BlackRock Liquid Environmentally Aware Fund, or LEAF, to purchase carbon offsets.


  • J&J, U.S. states settle hip implant claims for $120 million

    J&J, U.S. states settle hip implant claims for $120 millionAttorneys general of 46 U.S. states announced the settlement agreement in statements on Tuesday. DePuy in a statement said the settlement involves no admission of liability or misconduct on the part of the companies. "DePuy Synthes remains committed to meeting the current and future needs of orthopedic surgeons and patients," the company said.


  • This New At-Home HPV Test Can Help You Learn More About Your Cervical Cancer Risk

    This New At-Home HPV Test Can Help You Learn More About Your Cervical Cancer RiskLess than two-thirds of women are up-to-date on their screenings for the deadly cancer. Nurx has a new at-home test to help fix that. Here's what ob-gyns say.


  • Do You Need a Hearing Test?

    Do You Need a Hearing Test?Difficulty hearing can have profound effects. It has been associated with depression, concentration, and memory problems, may take a significant toll on relationships with friends, family, and co...


  • Do You Need a Hearing Test?

    Do You Need a Hearing Test?Difficulty hearing can have profound effects. It has been associated with depression, concentration, and memory problems, may take a significant toll on relationships with friends, family, and co...


  • The Roomba 690 is on sale for cheaper than its Black Friday price right now

    The Roomba 690 is on sale for cheaper than its Black Friday price right nowDid you know you can pick up a brand new iRobot Roomba for less than $250? It's true. The iRobot Roomba 690 robot vacuum with Wi-Fi connectivity is now on sale for just $247.99, or $127 off its retail price, on Amazon. This new sales price is actually a few dollars cheaper than its Black Friday sales price back in November. In fact, this is almost the lowest price Amazon has ever offered for this robot vacuum, so take advantage of this deal while it still lasts. SEE ALSO: Turn your Roomba's trip around the house into a playable 'Doom' map The iRobot Roomba 690 is a sleek and premium robot vacuum with three stages of cleaning for hardwood floors, carpets, and area rugs. Say goodbye to tiny particles, dust, pet hair, and dirt. Read more... More about Smart Home, Roomba, Mashable Shopping, Shopping Amazon, and Robot Vacuum


  • Extreme weather — not politicians — convinces Americans that climate change is real

    Extreme weather — not politicians — convinces Americans that climate change is realAmericans find today's climate science increasingly convincing, and a damaging mix of exceptional drought, storms, and record-breaking heat is the reason why.  The results of a new survey — conducted in November 2018 by the University of Chicago's Energy Policy Institute and the research organization The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research — found that nearly half of Americans said today's climate science "is more convincing than five years ago, with extreme weather driving their views." Overall, seven in 10 Americans reported that climate change is happening.  “The results of the survey demonstrate that most Americans consider climate change a reality and acknowledge that human activity is at least somewhat responsible,” Trevor Tompson, director of The AP-NORC Center, said in a statement.  According to a new @UChiEnergy & @NORCNews poll, more than half of Americans are more convinced than they were five years ago that #ClimateChange is happening: https://t.co/ibroFqTsUI #UChicago pic.twitter.com/3HcSBGm31m — UChicago (@UChicago) January 22, 2019 The poll gathered responses from just over 1,200 American adults, who were selected randomly from every state in the country. The random sample of Americans gave their answer over the phone or via the web. While 48 percent of Americans found today's modern climate science more convincing, 36 percent answered that their climate views haven't changed. Just 16 percent said that the climate science "has become less convincing." U.S. government atmospheric, marine, and earth scientists, however, have little doubt that the climate is experiencing profound change, and human activity is the dominant cause, as illustrated by recent reports from U.S. government scientists.  "This period is now the warmest in the history of modern civilization," the congressionally mandated Fourth National Climate Assessment, states.  SEE ALSO: Antarctica’s once sleepy ice sheets have awoken. That's bad. "This assessment concludes, based on extensive evidence, that it is extremely likely that human activities, especially emissions of greenhouse gases, are the dominant cause of the observed warming since the mid-20th century," the report adds.  Of the nearly half of Americans who said climate science has become more convincing, three-fourths of them attribute their changing views to the nation's recent bouts of extreme weather. In 2017 and 2018 alone, the U.S. experienced record-breaking heat, record-breaking flooding, record-breaking wildfires, and the relentless continuation of widespread drought over a huge swath of the Southwest. Political leaders, however, had a comparatively smaller influence over changing how Americans felt about climate science. Eighteen percent of those surveyed responded that the views of political leaders were an "influential factor" in their changing views. The last four years have been the four warmest on record for the planet #climatechange #StateOfClimate pic.twitter.com/0XG1xhCwnU — Ed Hawkins (@ed_hawkins) November 29, 2018 President Trump, who has by far the most influential reach on Twitter, consistently denies or jokes about global warming. Additionally, powerful Republican politicians continue to publicly sow doubt about climate science. Yet according to this recent poll, their efforts may be significantly overshadowed by the damaging realities of extreme weather.  The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) found that in 2017 the U.S. "experienced a historic year of weather and climate disasters," with 16 separate billion-dollar disasters. In total, 71 percent of Americans today reported that climate change is happening, which is similar to a 2017 poll from the same research organizations. As is well understood, most of the doubt about human-caused climate change comes from Republican voters. Of Americans who said climate change is happening, just five percent of Democrats said it can be explained by natural changes in the environment rather than human activity, as compared to nearly 30 percent of Republicans.  This is consistent with 40 years of sustained Republican suspicion about the sciences, environmental historian James Turner previously explained to Mashable.  But for the majority of Americans that do acknowledge the climate is changing, more are becoming convinced by mainstream, globally-agreed-upon science. After all, it's difficult to ignore extreme, pummeling weather.  WATCH: Ever wonder how the universe might end?  


  • EBay CEO Has a Stark Choice: Show Growth or Break Up Company

    EBay CEO Has a Stark Choice: Show Growth or Break Up CompanyEBay has no Prime-style subscription and makes a big deal about helping shoppers discover products rather than mission shopping as they typically do at Amazon.com Inc. To compete against his larger rival, Wenig has tried to freshen EBay’s image with younger shoppers, made the site easier to navigate and harnessed artificial intelligence to give EBay merchants real-time insights about what shoppers want and how much they’re willing to pay. Wall Street bought the story for a while, but with Amazon gaining and EBay atrophying, investors have been losing patience with Wenig’s slow-and-steady approach.


  • Equities slump on growth, trade worries

    Equities slump on growth, trade worriesA gauge of world stock markets fell on Tuesday as concerns over global growth and trade gave investors incentive to look toward safe-haven assets such as the Japanese yen and government bonds. Investors shunned risk assets like equities as the International Monetary Fund warned of a dimmer outlook on Monday, China confirmed its slowest growth rate in nearly 30 years, and as Brexit uncertainty continued to drag on sentiment. "There's so much in the background - trade, government shutdown, earnings season - you're going to have these big swings in the markets based on the latest data," said Paul Nolte, portfolio manager at Kingsview Asset Management in Chicago.


  • NASA shuffles crew for Boeing Starliner space taxi’s test flight due to medical issue

    NASA shuffles crew for Boeing Starliner space taxi’s test flight due to medical issueNASA says a medical issue is forcing a switch in the crew for the Boeing Starliner space taxi’s first crewed test flight to the International Space Station, currently scheduled for no earlier than August. Astronaut Eric Boe will no longer be on the flight due to unspecified medical reasons, NASA announced today. Instead, three-time spaceflier Mike Fincke will take Boe’s place alongside NASA’s Nicole Mann and Boeing test pilot Chris Ferguson. Fincke will begin training for the Starliner flight immediately, while Boe will replace Fincke as assistant to the chief for commercial crew in the astronaut office at Johnson Space… Read More


  • Apple Supplier Loses Half Its Value But Foreign Funds Just Won't Sell

    Apple Supplier Loses Half Its Value But Foreign Funds Just Won't SellAs of this week, foreign investors held about 17 percent of Han’s Laser through the northbound arm of the Shenzhen-Hong Kong stock connect: the highest proportion among more than 700 stocks that foreigners can invest in via the two-year-old market link. Admirers of Han’s Laser believe it’s close to a bottom in the wake of Apple boss Tim Cook’s surprise outlook cut in January, the culmination of months of concerns about iPhone demand that’ve walloped partners such as Hon Hai Precision Industry Co. Mounting evidence that China’s economy is cooling more rapidly than expected is also punishing industrial firms.


  • 'RBG' Filmmakers Report that Ruth Bader Ginsburg Is "Strong and Cheerful"

    'RBG' Filmmakers Report that Ruth Bader Ginsburg Is "Strong and Cheerful"Despite her recent surgery, the unflappable Supreme Court Justice is happy to be back at work.


  • The Colon Cancer Symptoms Young Men Should Never Ignore

    The Colon Cancer Symptoms Young Men Should Never IgnoreOur gastroenterology expert reveals what signs to look for.


  • PG&E shares surge as company secures $5.5 billion in bankruptcy financing

    PG&E shares surge as company secures $5.5 billion in bankruptcy financingThe financing will comprise a $3.5 billion revolving credit facility, a $1.5 billion term loan and a $500 million delayed-draw term loan. Investment banks JPMorgan Chase & Co, Bank of America Merrill Lynch, Barclays Plc and Citigroup Inc will provide financing, the company said in a filing. Separately on Tuesday, PG&E shareholder BlueMountain Capital Management LLC urged the power producer to delay its plans to file for bankruptcy.


  • Pre-infected $80 tissues claim to help you prepare for flu season. Here's what doctors have to say.

    Pre-infected $80 tissues claim to help you prepare for flu season. Here's what doctors have to say.“We believe using a tissue that carries a human sneeze is safer than needles or pills,” the makers of Vaev tissues say.


  • Bleeding risks may offset aspirin's benefit vs heart disease

    Bleeding risks may offset aspirin's benefit vs heart diseaseShould healthy people take aspirin to ward off heart disease? The notion has been controversial, and the medical advice mixed. Aspirin is a blood thinner and can help prevent clots that may lead to heart attack or stroke.


  • 19-Year-Old Mom and Newborn Baby Both Die After She Delayed Her Cancer Treatment to Save Son

    19-Year-Old Mom and Newborn Baby Both Die After She Delayed Her Cancer Treatment to Save SonTeen Mom and Newborn Baby Die After Delayed Cancer Treatment


  • Daily dose of aspirin ‘not worth risk’ as study warns of bleeding side-effects

    Daily dose of aspirin ‘not worth risk’ as study warns of bleeding side-effectsAspirin should not be taken to prevent heart disease unless on doctors’ orders, scientists have warned after a major study found the drug “substantially” increases the risk of dangerous bleeds. A review of 164,225 people in their fifties, sixties and seventies found that regularly taking the inexpensive drug boosts the chances of major bleeding by more than 40 per cent. Aspirin has long been recommended for patients already known to suffer from heart conditions and those at high risk of stroke, with evidence indicating its blood-thinning qualities render the risk of side-effects worthwhile. However, the new research by King’s College London suggests that for middle-aged and older people currently in good health, the benefit of regularly taking the drug is not worth the risk of serious bleeding. Aspirin is not routinely prescribed for “primary prevention” of heart disease or stroke in the UK. Nevertheless, experts have estimated that tens of thousands of healthy people take the inexpensive drug anyway. Published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, the study of 53 to 74-year-olds included people taking aspirin, those taking a placebo and those on no treatment at all. Regular use of aspirin was associated with an 11 per cent lower risk of cardiovascular events such as heart disease, heart attack and stroke. This means that roughly 250 patients would need to be treated with the medication for five years to prevent a single cardiovascular event. However, those taking aspirin were 43 per cent more likely to suffer a major bleeding episode than those not using the drug. Dr Sean Zheng, who led the research, said: "This study demonstrates that there is insufficient evidence to recommend routine aspirin use in the prevention of heart attacks, strokes and cardiovascular deaths in people without cardiovascular disease.” At a glance | Cancer risk reduction with daily aspirin Meanwhile Professor Stephen Evans, from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, said: "The message for healthy patients is that taking aspirin has a small benefit to prevent heart disease but also at least as large a harm in terms of serious bleeding. "For some individual patients the balance may tip more clearly in either direction." After Alzheimer’s, heart disease is Britain’s second biggest killer, claiming roughly 153,300 lives a year of approximately seven million patients living with one or more of the conditions, which are closely linked to poor lifestyle. Last night the Royal College of GPs (RCGP)said patients who regularly take aspirin “should not panic”, but should talk to their family doctor if they are concerned about the drug. “Aspirin can be an inexpensive and effective drug for reducing risks of recurrence in patients who have suffered a stroke or heart attack, but we have known for many years that there are risks and side effects involved with its long-term use, and this study highlights the importance of managing its use carefully and effectively,” said Professor Helen Stokes-Lampard, RCGP chair. Experts have previously warned people who have been self-medicating with daily low-dose aspirin against stopping abruptly in order to avoid rebound “stickiness” of the blood. Instead, they recommend reducing the dose gradually over a month to six weeks. "Aspirin use requires discussion between the patient and their physician, with the knowledge that any small potential cardiovascular benefits are weighed up against the real risk of severe bleeding,” said Dr Zheng. Kevin McConway, emeritus professor of applied statistics at the Open University, said future research should concentrate on methods of enabling GPs to recommend aspirin on a more personal basis. “Ideally it would help to know whether some people have characteristics that make aspirin a good choice for them, while it would be better for others to avoid it,” he said.


  • Oil drops nearly 3 percent on rising supplies, China slowdown

    Oil drops nearly 3 percent on rising supplies, China slowdownOil prices fell 3 percent on Tuesday over concerns the world's stumbling economy could pinch fuel demand as U.S. crude output climbs to new heights and cuts by Saudi Arabia and its allies are smaller than advertised. Gloomy new global growth forecasts by the International Monetary Fund and signs of a spreading slowdown in China weighed on crude prices as traders worried about supplies rising in 2019 despite lower prices. U.S. West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures fell $1.57, or 2.9 percent, to $52.23.


  • Nigeria's new outbreak of Lassa fever kills 16

    Nigeria's new outbreak of Lassa fever kills 16Nigerian health authorities on Tuesday declared a new outbreak of Lassa fever that has killed 16 people since early January, despite successfully containing the disease last year. "Since the onset of the 2019 outbreak, there have been 16 deaths in confirmed cases," said a report released by the National Centre for Control (NCDC), revealing a 26.7 percent mortality rate in confirmed cases. "Given this increase in reported cases of Lassa fever, the NCDC has declared this an outbreak and activated an Emergency Operations Centre to coordinate the response," the report said.


  • Brexit backer Dyson moves vacuum giant's HQ to Singapore

    Brexit backer Dyson moves vacuum giant's HQ to SingaporeJames Dyson, the billionaire Brexit supporter who revolutionized vacuum cleaners with his bagless technology, is moving his head office to Singapore from Britain to be closer to his company's fastest-growing markets. Dyson's company said the move to Singapore, where it will build its new electric car, was not driven by Britain's looming departure from the European Union or tax implications, with much of its product development remaining in south west England. The 71-year-old inventor has become one of Britain's best-known entrepreneurs, creating a multibillion-dollar company from an insight that a cyclone could collect household dust better than a clogged-up bag.


  • This woman died after having a routine colonoscopy — now the hospital is being questioned

    This woman died after having a routine colonoscopy — now the hospital is being questionedMartha Wright, 83, reportedly died of internal bleeding.


  • Brazilian leader at odds with Davos focus on environment

    Brazilian leader at odds with Davos focus on environmentDAVOS, Switzerland (AP) — Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro pledged to work "in harmony with the world" to cut carbon emissions, aiming to quell international concerns that his country, the main custodian of the oxygen-rich Amazon, could put economic interests over environmental ones.


  • Bleeding risks may offset aspirin's benefit vs heart disease

    Bleeding risks may offset aspirin's benefit vs heart diseaseShould healthy people take aspirin to ward off heart disease? The notion has been controversial, and the medical advice mixed. Aspirin is a blood thinner and can help prevent clots that may lead to heart attack or stroke.


  • More And Bigger Private Jets Landing at Davos as Leaders Discuss Climate Change

    More And Bigger Private Jets Landing at Davos as Leaders Discuss Climate ChangeMore And Bigger Private Jets Landing at Davos as Leaders Discuss Climate Change