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  • Canada's oil-rich Alberta province to vote on April 16

    Canada's oil-rich Alberta province to vote on April 16Premier Rachel Notley's left-leaning New Democratic Party won a shock victory in traditionally conservative Alberta in 2015, ending 44 years of conservative rule, but inherited a provincial economy rocked by the collapse of global oil prices. Notley was initially an ally of Liberal Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and backed his attempts to please the oil industry and environmentalists by championing export pipelines while also introducing carbon pricing. The relationship soured last year over efforts to expand the Trans Mountain pipeline, prompting Notley to pull her support for Trudeau's carbon plan.


  • Coroner: 'Y&R' star Kristoff St. John's cause of death was heart disease; alcohol contributed

    Coroner: 'Y&R' star Kristoff St. John's cause of death was heart disease; alcohol contributedSoap-opera star Kristoff St. John's death was the result of hypertrophic heart disease, the Los Angeles County Coroner's Office has concluded. Alcohol was a contributing factor.


  • Here's How the U.S. Navy Launches Anti-Submarine Torpedoes

    Here's How the U.S. Navy Launches Anti-Submarine TorpedoesThe torpedoes are designed to home in on enemy submarines.


  • Best Robot Vacuums For Your Home

    Best Robot Vacuums For Your HomeKiss your mop and broom goodbye.


  • Google Pushes Into Video Games With Stadia Service

    Google Pushes Into Video Games With Stadia ServiceThe Alphabet Inc. unit unveiled Tuesday a new game streaming service called Stadia at the Game Developers Conference in San Francisco. The announcement marks a major new foray into the $180 billion industry for the internet giant. Stadia lets developers build new games on a streaming platform that will allow players to access the action through the web instead of having to buy expensive consoles or personal computers.


  • WHO panel calls for registry of all human gene editing research

    WHO panel calls for registry of all human gene editing researchAfter its first two-day meeting in Geneva, the WHO panel of gene editing experts - which was established in December after a Chinese scientist said he had edited the genes of twin babies - said it had agreed a framework for setting future standards. It said a central registry of all human genome editing research was needed "in order to create an open and transparent database of ongoing work", and asked the WHO to start setting up such a registry immediately. "The committee will develop essential tools and guidance for all those working on this new technology to ensure maximum benefit and minimal risk to human health," Soumya Swamanathan, the WHO's chief scientist, said in a statement.


  • Houston petrochemical fire rages, Texas expands air monitoring

    Houston petrochemical fire rages, Texas expands air monitoringHouston officials and environmental groups raced to expand air monitoring on Tuesday after a raging fire at a Mitsui & Co petrochemical storage site produced billowing acrid smoke that could be seen and smelled miles away. The blaze at Mitsui unit Intercontinental Terminals Co in Deer Park, Texas, burned for a third day after firefighting water pumps broke down for six hours on Monday evening and flames engulfed two more tanks, the company said. The fire began on Sunday when a leaking tank containing volatile naphtha, a fuel used in the production of gasoline, ignited and flames quickly spread to nearby tanks, ITC said.


  • Trump forges bond with Brazil's Bolsonaro in White House visit

    Trump forges bond with Brazil's Bolsonaro in White House visitIn a joint news conference in the White House Rose Garden, Trump said he told Bolsonaro he would designate Brazil a major non-NATO ally and possibly go further by supporting a campaign to make Brazil "maybe a NATO ally." Bolsonaro, a former army captain who rode to the presidency with a brash, anti-establishment campaign modeled on Trump's 2016 run, has declared himself an unabashed admirer of the U.S. president and the American way of life. "Brazil and the United States are tied by the guarantee of liberty, respect for the traditional family, the fear of God our creator, against gender identity, political correctness and fake news," Bolsonaro said, touching on themes that have inflamed his critics in Brazil.


  • The powerful meteor that no one saw (except satellites)

    The powerful meteor that no one saw (except satellites)A meteor is the luminous phenomenon that results when an asteroid or other celestial body enters the Earth's atmosphere. One of the first researchers to detect the event was Peter Brown, a meteor scientist at the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Western Ontario.


  • This Could Be the Earliest Sign of Alzheimer's Disease (Hint: It's Not Getting Lost)

    This Could Be the Earliest Sign of Alzheimer's Disease (Hint: It's Not Getting Lost)At risk for Alzheimer's? Keep an eye out for this one thing, because it could show up way before the most common symptoms do.


  • This Is How Many Eggs per Day Increase Heart Risk

    This Is How Many Eggs per Day Increase Heart RiskDo you really have to worry about eggs again? Not so fast, despite what the headlines may be claiming.


  • Supermoon, first day of spring are an astronomical doubleheader coming Wednesday

    Supermoon, first day of spring are an astronomical doubleheader coming WednesdayWe've got a doubleheader of astronomy action this Wednesday: the final "supermoon" of the year and the vernal equinox, which marks the first day of spring.


  • Glossier Is NYC's Newest Unicorn With $1.2 Billion Valuation

    Glossier Is NYC's Newest Unicorn With $1.2 Billion ValuationThe beauty startup that sells directly to consumers online is now valued at more than $1.2 billion after its latest funding round, according to two people familiar with the company who didn’t want to be named because the matter is private. Glossier products are sent to consumers in baby pink boxes along with a baby pink bubble pouch for carrying the items and sticker sheets to “bling up" makeup bags. By connecting directly with consumers, Glossier has access to “endless inspiration for new products," she said.


  • Heat records falling twice as often as cold ones, AP finds

    Heat records falling twice as often as cold ones, AP findsOver the past 20 years, Americans have been twice as likely to sweat through record-breaking heat rather than shiver through record-setting cold, a new Associated Press data analysis shows.


  • UN: Gene editing for human reproduction is 'irresponsible'

    UN: Gene editing for human reproduction is 'irresponsible'GENEVA (AP) — A panel convened by the World Health Organization said it would be "irresponsible" for scientists to use gene editing for reproductive purposes, but stopped short of calling for a ban.


  • Apple Watch can help doctors diagnose atrial fibrillation

    Apple Watch can help doctors diagnose atrial fibrillationEd Dentel’s Apple Watch informed him that he had an irregular heartbeat last year. It was right, and potentially saved his life. Stanford researchers have shown that the watches can detect atrial fibrillation, a dangerous heart rhythm that has the potential to cause stroke. Atrial fibrillation is the most common abnormal heart rhythm, and affects up to 6 million people in the U.S. Often, those affected have no symptoms, or experience mild palpitations in the chest.


  • The 9 Best Toy Robots That Teach Kids Coding and STEM Skills

    The 9 Best Toy Robots That Teach Kids Coding and STEM SkillsThese are the droids you're looking for.


  • Monthly HIV Injection Treatments Could Soon Become Available

    Monthly HIV Injection Treatments Could Soon Become AvailableTwo clinical trials indicate that we may have a new course of treatment on the horizon


  • NASA photos capture immense flooding of a vital U.S. Air Force base

    NASA photos capture immense flooding of a vital U.S. Air Force baseIn 1948, Air Force Secretary Stuart Symington stationed the United States' long-range nuclear bombers at Offutt Air Force Base in eastern Nebraska, a location safe in the middle of the nation and well-insulated from the coast. But 70 years later, the base — now home to the U.S. Strategic Command which deters "catastrophic actions from adversaries and poses an immediate threat to any actor who questions U.S. resolve by demonstrating our capabilities" — isn't safe from historic and record-setting floods.  Intense rains on top of the rapid melting of ample snow has inundated large swathes of Nebraska and a full one-third of the Offutt Air Force Base, including the headquarters building. NASA's Landsat 8 satellite captured before and after images of the flooding — which the European Union Earth Observation Programme called "biblical." The overloaded river burgeoned in size, creeping into Offutt, neighborhoods, and farmlands.  Satellite image from March 20, 2018, a year prior to the flooding. Image: nasa Flooded Nebraska on March 16, 2019. Image: nasa A number of potent factors mixed to create what Offutt Air Force Base Commander Mike Manion has labeled a "1,000 year flood" — meaning there's only a one in 1,000 chance of such an extreme event happening in any given year.  NASA noted that exceptionally cold Arctic blasts (from a wobbly polar vortex) preserved bounties of snow that soon rapidly melted when "unusually warm" March air produced massive amounts of runoff. Exacerbating matters, the winter's freeze made the ground less absorbent when extreme downpours then slammed the region.  SEE ALSO: The Green New Deal: Historians weigh in on the immense scale required to pull it off If that wasn't enough, big rains in 2018 had already "loaded the dice even more," meteorologist Bryce Anderson noted on Twitter: A thawed ground, already saturated with water, wouldn't have been able to soak up much water anyway, he said Historic flooding in #Nebraska has over 74 cities under emergency declarations. Shown here are before and after images of Offutt Air Force Base along the #Missouri River. #NebraskaFlood #NebraskaStrong https://t.co/yl9x3FH3RD pic.twitter.com/WSBzez4BkA — DigitalGlobe (@DigitalGlobe) March 19, 2019 On top of this confluence of extreme weather events, Earth's atmosphere is considerably different than it was a century ago. Specifically, the climate has warmed by 1 degree Celsius (1.8 Fahrenheit), and due to simple physics, the warmer air is able to hold more water vapor. Specifically, for every 1 degree Celsius of warming, the air can hold seven percent more water. That means more intense downpours. Between 1958 and 2012, the amount of rain in the heaviest rainfall events in the midwest shot up by 37 percent, according to U.S. government scientists. Forthcoming research will reveal the role climate change played during these floods, though atmospheric scientists expect this same climate lever to bring more intense precipitation blasts to other parts of the nation in the near future, notably California.  A flooded runway at Offutt Air Force Base Image: U.S. Air Force photo by TSgt. Rachelle Blake On March 17, the National Weather Service (NWS) expected the Missouri River just south of Offutt Air Force Base to break record levels by a whopping four feet, noted CBS meteorologist Eric Fisher. The forecast turned out to be almost spot on. "That's unreal for a river with some big floods in the past," Fisher wrote.  WATCH: Ever wonder how the universe might end?    


  • Super worm moon to rise on first day of spring

    Super worm moon to rise on first day of springStargazers will soon be treated to a rare super moon that hasn't occurred in nearly two decades. The super worm moon will be visible to those located in the Northern Hemisphere on Wednesday night, according to National Geographic. The moon will reach its full phase around 9:43 p.m. EDT and coincides with the spring equinox, which will occur just before 6 p.m. EDT.


  • GSK reports positive data from trial of endometrial cancer drug

    GSK reports positive data from trial of endometrial cancer drugGlaxoSmithKline said on Tuesday a study testing its experimental drug dostarlimab in women with recurrent or advanced endometrial cancer showed promising results. Results from the GARNET study showed the drug elicited clinically meaningful and durable response rates when used to treat certain types of tumors, GSK said. GSK said it would apply for marketing approval for dostarlimab in endometrial cancer at the end of 2019.


  • Hawaii bills push 1st state ban on plastics in restaurants

    Hawaii bills push 1st state ban on plastics in restaurantsHONOLULU (AP) — Hawaii would be the first state in the U.S. to ban most plastics at restaurants under legislation that aims to cut down on waste that pollutes the ocean.


  • ECOVACS Deebot robot vacuums on sale for $100 off, just in time for spring cleaning

    ECOVACS Deebot robot vacuums on sale for $100 off, just in time for spring cleaningA lot of promises were made about what the future would look like, and there's definitely a severe lack of robot butlers. Are we supposed to clean, cook, and make our own tea? Fortunately, we have a little bit of help with the cleaning part thanks to products like the ECOVACS Deebot robot vacuum. Until we can trust robots with knives, cooking is best left to human hands. Tidy up your room while you sit back and sip on a fresh cup of tea thanks to this deal for $100 off an ECOVACS Deebot N79S robot vacuum cleaner at Amazon. At $199.98, you get a quality robot vacuum that includes many Roomba features at a cheaper price.  Read more...More about Home, Spring Cleaning, Robot Vacuums, Mashable Shopping, and Ecovac


  • Facebook Pledges to Block Discriminatory Advertising

    Facebook Pledges to Block Discriminatory Advertising“Getting this right is deeply important to me and all of us at Facebook,” Sheryl Sandberg, the company’s chief operating officer, said in a blog post to be published Tuesday. The social media platform called the settlement “historic” and expressed gratitude to the National Fair Housing Alliance and the American Civil Liberties Union, two of the groups that sued it in the first place.


  • Fish in river that famously caught fire now OK'd for dinner

    Fish in river that famously caught fire now OK'd for dinnerCOLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Fish in the Cuyahoga River, which became synonymous with pollution when it caught fire in Cleveland in 1969, are now safe to eat, federal environmental regulators say.


  • NASA's plan to scoop up dirt from asteroid hits a snag

    NASA's plan to scoop up dirt from asteroid hits a snagNEW YORK (AP) — NASA's plan to scoop up dirt and gravel from an asteroid has hit a snag.


  • 'Rubble pile' asteroid holds clues to Earth's water story

    'Rubble pile' asteroid holds clues to Earth's water storyAn asteroid described as a "pile of rubble" is rich in hydrated minerals that could help solve the mystery of how Earth got its water, scientists said Tuesday. The Ryugu asteroid, around 300 million kilometres (185 million miles) from Earth, is estimated to be between 100 million and one billion years old. It appears to have broken off from a parent body, according to observations from a Japanese probe that landed on the space rock.


  • The Air Force's New AI Is Basically R2-D2 for Fighter Jets

    The Air Force's New AI Is Basically R2-D2 for Fighter JetsThe U.S. military wants to put artificial intelligence in the cockpit, as an assistant or AI-powered wingman.


  • Kazakhstan's leader Nazarbayev resigns after three decades in power

    Kazakhstan's leader Nazarbayev resigns after three decades in power"I have taken a decision, which was not easy for me, to resign as president," Nazarbayev said in a nationwide TV address, flanked by his country's blue and yellow flags, before signing a decree terminating his powers from March 20. "As the founder of the independent Kazakh state I see my task now in facilitating the rise of a new generation of leaders who will continue the reforms that are underway in the country." But Nazarbayev, a close ally of Russian President Vladimir Putin, said he would retain key security council and party leader positions and hand over the presidency to a loyal ally for the rest of his term, which ends in April 2020. Kassym-Jomart Tokayev, speaker of the upper house of parliament, will take over as Kazakhstan's acting president for the remainder of his term in line with the constitution, Nazarbayev said.


  • Leaky Gut Syndrome Isn’t an Official Diagnosis, but the Symptoms Are Real

    Leaky Gut Syndrome Isn’t an Official Diagnosis, but the Symptoms Are RealWhat we know—and don't know


  • Instagram Will Now Let You Buy Things Directly Through the App

    Instagram Will Now Let You Buy Things Directly Through the AppStarting Tuesday, the photo-sharing app is testing a shopping feature, called Checkout, with a handful of retailers including Nike Inc. and designer fashion platform Revolve. “Over time, as we are creating value for people, this could be a significant part of our business,” said Vishal Shah, Instagram’s head of product. On Checkout, people will be able to buy directly within Instagram, rather than being directed to a retailer’s website.


  • Scientists revive DNA from ancient woolly mammoth

    Scientists revive DNA from ancient woolly mammothThe extinct beast's remains were found in Northern Asia in 2010. It has since been named "Yuka" and is thought to be nearly 30,000 years old. The breakthrough occurred at Japan's Kindai University. Scientists say DNA from Yuka's muscle sprang back to life after being injected into mice cells. Cloning Yuka is still far out of reach because her cells are degraded and damaged.


  • Natalie Portman Is a Discontent Grounded Astronaut in Lucy in the Sky Trailer

    Natalie Portman Is a Discontent Grounded Astronaut in Lucy in the Sky TrailerIn the first trailer for ‘Lucy in the Sky,’ Natalie Portman is astronaut Lucy Cola, struggling to readjust to life on earth, alongside Dan Stevens and Jon Hamm.


  • Experiment proves that humans can actually sense Earth’s magnetic field

    Experiment proves that humans can actually sense Earth’s magnetic fieldEveryone knows that when you hold a compass in your hand the needle will point north thanks to Earth's magnetic field, but aside from simple navigation you probably don't spare much thought for our planet's magnetism. However, that doesn't mean that your body isn't still sensing the geomagnetic forces, and a new study suggests that humans, like many other animals, can indeed sense the magnetic field.The research, which was carried out by scientists at Caltech, reveals that humans have what might be described as a subconscious ability to detect geomagnetic forces. Whether that ability played a role in our past or if it's still influencing us today is a much more difficult question to answer.The debate over whether humans can sense Earth's magnetic field has been happening in science circles for decades. Many past experiments relied on the actions or behavior of participants in order to draw a conclusion, but Caltech's technique was more straightforward, using EEG brain scans to see how a person's brain reacts to geomagnetic forces.Dozens of participants were placed in a Faraday cage -- an enclosure designed specifically to block external magnetic fields -- and then subjected to magnetic forces that the researchers could control themselves. This allowed the scientists to see exactly how the brains of the volunteers reacted to changes in the magnetic field without any external influence.What the team found was that while the participants said they didn't actively feel any changes happening, their brains were telling a different story."The brains were 'concerned' with the unexpected change in the magnetic field direction, and this triggered the alpha-wave reduction," the researchers explain. "That we saw such alpha-ERD patterns in response to simple magnetic rotations is powerful evidence for human magnetoreception."Put simply, our brains definitely monitor magnetic fields even if we don't realize it. The fact that our brains can sense geomagnetism isn't a huge shock, as many species actively use magnetic fields for navigation, but we still don't know whether that information is being used by our brains in any meaningful way. It's even possible that our brains' reactions are a leftover from ancient ancestors that did actively use geomagnetism, but that would be very difficult to prove.


  • Cyclone hit millions across Africa in record disaster: U.N.

    Cyclone hit millions across Africa in record disaster: U.N.MAPUTO/HARARE (Reuters) - Cyclone winds and floods that swept across southeastern Africa affected more than 2.6 million people and could rank as one of the worst weather-related disasters recorded in the southern hemisphere, U.N. officials said on Tuesday. Rescue crews are still struggling to reach victims five days after Cyclone Idai raced in at speeds of up to 170 kph (105 mph) from the Indian Ocean into Mozambique, then its inland neighbors Zimbabwe and Malawi. Aid groups said many survivors were trapped in remote areas, surrounded by wrecked roads, flattened buildings and submerged villages, while the Red Cross said at least 400,000 people had been made homeless in central Mozambique alone.


  • Dartmouth professor wins top religion prize

    Dartmouth professor wins top religion prizeHANOVER, N.H. (AP) — A Dartmouth College professor of physics and astronomy was awarded one of the world's leading religion prizes for blending hard science and deep spirituality in his work, a foundation announced Tuesday.


  • Thousands demonstrate in Algiers as protest leaders tell army to stay away

    Thousands demonstrate in Algiers as protest leaders tell army to stay awayIn the first direct public message to the generals from leaders emerging from nearly a month of mass protests against Bouteflika, the National Coordination for Change said the military should "play its constitutional role without interfering in the people's choice". Bouteflika, who has ruled for 20 years, bowed to the protesters last week by announcing he would not stand for another term. "We will not stop our pressure until he (Bouteflika) goes," said student Ali Adjimi, 23.


  • Natalie Portman and Jon Hamm Go to Space in Eerie 'Lucy in the Sky' Teaser Trailer

    Natalie Portman and Jon Hamm Go to Space in Eerie 'Lucy in the Sky' Teaser TrailerThe Oscar winner plays an astronaut losing her grip on reality in her next film.


  • Big Norwegian Aluminum Producer Suffers Extensive Cyber Attack

    Big Norwegian Aluminum Producer Suffers Extensive Cyber AttackNorsk Hydro ASA, one of the world’s biggest aluminum producers, suffered production outages after a cyber attack affected operations across Europe and the U.S. Aluminum futures on the London Metal Exchange rose in line with other metals.


  • Roche's Tecentriq Gets FDA Approval for Difficult Lung Cancer

    Roche's Tecentriq Gets FDA Approval for Difficult Lung CancerRoche (RHHBY) gets an FDA approval of sBLA for Tecentriq in combination with chemotherapy for the first-line treatment of extensive-stage small cell lung cancer (ES-SCLC).


  • When Doctors 'See' My Weight Before They 'See' Me

    When Doctors 'See' My Weight Before They 'See' MeAn overweight woman living with fibromyalgia and intracranial hypertension, a rare condition causing headaches and pain, shares her frustration when doctors and society think her weight is causing her disability.


  • South African Builders Seek Help as Crime Disrupts $1.8 Billion of Projects

    South African Builders Seek Help as Crime Disrupts $1.8 Billion of ProjectsArmed gangs “recently” disrupted the 1.65 billion-rand Mtentu Bridge project in the Eastern Cape province, and a 2.4 billion-rand oil-storage investment project at Saldanha in the Western Cape was halted on March 13 after people demanding to be part of the project burnt down properties, the South African Forum of Civil Engineering Contractors said in a March 18 letter addressed to Finance Minister Tito Mboweni.


  • Lowering blood pressure could reduce the number brain lesions in seniors: study

    Lowering blood pressure could reduce the number brain lesions in seniors: studyNew US research has found that lowering blood pressure of seniors appears to reduce the number of harmful lesions in the brain, as well as provide protection against cardiovascular events. Carried out by researchers at the University of Connecticut School of Medicine's Calhoun Cardiology Center, the new study looked at 199 participants with an average age of 81 who all had hypertension (high blood pressure) at the start of the study. The average systolic blood pressure of the participants was around 150 mm Hg, with all participants also showing some evidence of some cerebrovascular disease on an MRI scan.


  • The Apple Heart Study Was Successful at Detecting a Life-Threatening Condition

    The Apple Heart Study Was Successful at Detecting a Life-Threatening ConditionPreliminary results indicate the study was a smashing success.


  • Aircraft Carrier Denied: Why If the U.S. Navy Never Built 'Supercarriers'?

    Aircraft Carrier Denied: Why If the U.S. Navy Never Built 'Supercarriers'?Bad news?


  • Emergency ascent in Indian Ocean as sub fills with smoke

    Emergency ascent in Indian Ocean as sub fills with smokeALPHONSE ISLAND, Seychelles (AP) — A British scientist and her American pilot made an emergency ascent from 100 meters (328 feet) beneath the surface of the Indian Ocean on Tuesday after smoke filled the cockpit of their submersible.


  • Stanford scientists convert seawater to hydrogen fuel

    Stanford scientists convert seawater to hydrogen fuelUsing solar power, electrodes, and saltwater from the San Francisco Bay, a team of research scientists at Stanford University managed to generate hydrogen fuel, a fuel option that doesn't emit carbon dioxide. This approach creates hydrogen fuel from the San Francisco Bay's saltwater, whereas traditional methods rely on impractical amounts of purified water to have significant real-life application.


  • US accuses Russia, China of undermining space peace push

    US accuses Russia, China of undermining space peace pushThe US on Tuesday accused Russia and China of raising the risk of conflict in space, notably by developing anti-satellite weapons, as diplomats held talks on a treaty to keep space peaceful. The closed-door negotiations in Geneva involving experts from 25 governments -- including the US, China and Russia -- are aimed at laying the groundwork for a legally-binding text to prevent an arms race in outer space.


  • It's Never Too Late to Get Measles—Or the Vaccine

    It's Never Too Late to Get Measles—Or the VaccineSome people might even need the vaccine again.


  • Anonymous Twitter Account Surges in Followers After Devin Nunes Lawsuit 

    Anonymous Twitter Account Surges in Followers After Devin Nunes Lawsuit The move had an immediate effect: One of the accounts gained more than 60,000 followers. The complaint claims a Republican political strategist named Liz Mair fueled a campaign targeting Nunes as well as two anonymous accounts, @DevinNunesMom, which has now been suspended, and @DevinCow. Nunes also alleges Twitter “shadow banned” him in 2018 “in order to restrict his free speech.” People claiming to have been shadow banned say they can see their own tweets but that they aren’t visible to their followers.