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  • AOC suggests NYC crime spike linked to unemployment and parents shoplifting to feed children

    AOC suggests NYC crime spike linked to unemployment and parents shoplifting to feed childrenNew York congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez has insisted that spikes in New York crime are not related to police budget cuts but people needing to pay rent and feed their children.In a virtual town hall meeting on Thursday, reported by The Hill, AOC was questioned about the significant rise in crime in the city.


  • U.S. judge delays first federal executions in 17 years

    U.S. judge delays first federal executions in 17 yearsA U.S. federal judge issued an injunction on Monday delaying what would have been the first federal execution in 17 years, scheduled for later in the day, thwarting at least for now the Trump administration's goal of reviving capital punishment at the federal level. Judge Tanya Chutkan of the U.S. district court in Washington ordered the U.S. Department of Justice to delay four executions scheduled for July and August to allow continuation of the condemned men's legal challenges against a new lethal injection protocol announced in 2019.


  • A YouTuber and her friend who got sick at Disney World's reopening are being criticized for ignoring medical advice to go to the hospital after 'violently vomiting'

    A YouTuber and her friend who got sick at Disney World's reopening are being criticized for ignoring medical advice to go to the hospital after 'violently vomiting'The women insisted that the health scare was an allergic reaction — and not the result of COVID-19 — but commenters remained concerned.


  • It’s so hot at Death Valley National Park that cars are breaking down

    It’s so hot at Death Valley National Park that cars are breaking downIt’s the hottest place on Earth for a reason.


  • Ousted U.S. Attorney Geoffrey Berman: Deal Barr Offered ‘Could Be Seen as a Quid Pro Quo’

    Ousted U.S. Attorney Geoffrey Berman: Deal Barr Offered ‘Could Be Seen as a Quid Pro Quo’The federal prosecutor whom Attorney General Bill Barr ousted in June told House investigators that he was alarmed at the way Barr attempted to replace him, saying that “the “irregular and unexplained actions by the Attorney General raised serious concerns for me,” according to a transcript of the closed-door interview released by the House Judiciary Committee on Monday. Geoffrey Berman, formerly the U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York, was brought in for a closed-door session of the Judiciary Committee on July 9 to talk about the events surrounding Barr’s public announcement on June 19 that Berman had “stepped down” from his post, even though the U.S. attorney made clear to Barr multiple times that he was not stepping down. The late-night announcement by Barr immediately sparked confusion and raised questions about his involvement in a crucial prosecutor’s office. The next day, Berman said he would leave the job when Barr agreed to let his deputy take over as acting U.S. attorney, as opposed to Craig Carpenito, the U.S. attorney for the district of New Jersey, whom Barr wanted to install in the position until the Trump administration’s pick, Securities and Exchange Commission chief Jay Clayton, was confirmed by the U.S. Senate.Berman, who at SDNY handled sensitive investigations into Trumpworld figures such as Rudy Giuliani, did not comment specifically to the Judiciary Committee on what he believed Barr’s motivations to be, and he studiously avoided any questions about how specific SDNY probes might have factored into the situation. But Berman made clear that the attorney general’s preferred plan would have slowed and complicated the work of the office, and he raised several questions challenging Barr’s handling of the process. Trump Thought He’d Picked His Perfect U.S. Attorney in Geoffrey Berman. He Was Very Wrong.“Why did the attorney general say that I was stepping down when he knew I had neither resigned nor been fired?” Berman asked rhetorically, in response to questions from Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler (D-NY). “Why did the attorney general not tell me the actual reason he was asking me to resign instead of saying that it was to get Clayton into the position? And why did he announce the appointment of Craig Carpenito as acting U.S. attorney when Audrey Strauss was the logical and normal successor?”“Replacing me with someone from outside the district would have resulted in the disruption and delay of the important investigations that were being conducted,” Berman said later. “I was not going to permit that. And I would rather be fired than have that done.” At numerous points, Berman expressed his dismay at Barr’s wish to install Carpenito—who would have retained his previous job in New Jersey—in the job instead of Berman’s top deputy, Strauss, a move he said violated 70 years of precedent at SDNY.According to his opening statement that was obtained by The Daily Beast last Thursday, Berman said that during a private meeting in New York that Barr called to open the discussion, the attorney general praised his performance as U.S. attorney but said the Trump administration wanted Clayton to take the SDNY post. Berman said Barr tried to lure him away by dangling other offers—to head the Department of Justice’s civil rights division and, later, the SEC—but Berman declined. Barr told him that if he did not resign, he would be fired. “I believe the attorney general was trying to entice me to resign so that an outsider could be put into the acting U.S. attorney position at the Southern District of New York, which would have resulted in the delay and disruption of ongoing investigations,” Berman told the Judiciary Committee.At one point in the interview, GOP committee attorney Steve Castor asked if Barr had laid out to Berman a set of actions that would have allowed him to keep his job—if there was any “quid pro quo for you getting to keep your job.”Berman said no, and he confirmed that Barr did not mention any specific SDNY investigations—Castor raised Jeffrey Epstein and Guiliani-related probes—in pressuring him to leave. But Berman did say Barr’s offering of other positions could have been construed as a quid pro quo.“You know, he wanted me to resign to take a position. I assume you could call that a quid pro quo. You resign and you get this, that would mean quid pro quo,” said Berman. Asked to clarify those comments later, he said it wasn’t his term but reiterated that “it could be seen as a quid pro quo, his offering me a job in exchange for my resignation.” Berman is a rare U.S. attorney in that he was not confirmed by the Senate but was appointed by the judges of SDNY to hold the position in April 2018. Berman insisted that, as he was a court-appointed prosecutor, neither Barr nor President Trump had the authority to fire him before the Senate confirmed a successor, but some past legal precedent has indicated the president can fire a court-appointed U.S. attorney. Trump has said he had nothing to do with Berman’s ouster. Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


  • Boeing lands the first order of the F-15EX

    Boeing lands the first order of the F-15EXThe first award covers an initial lot of eight jets.


  • 64 Stunning Kitchen Island Ideas
  • 'I wouldn’t trust you to care for a house plant let alone my child': Pressley slams DeVos on reopening schools

    'I wouldn’t trust you to care for a house plant let alone my child': Pressley slams DeVos on reopening schools"I wouldn’t trust you to care for a house plant let alone my child," Pressley said in reply to DeVos' remarks on reopening schools amid the pandemic.


  • New Zealand mosque shooter dismisses lawyers to represent himself at sentencing

    New Zealand mosque shooter dismisses lawyers to represent himself at sentencingThe gunman behind New Zealand's Christchurch mosque shootings sacked his lawyers on Monday and opted to represent himself, raising fears he would use a sentencing hearing next month to promote his white-supremacist views. Australian national Brenton Tarrant will be sentenced on August 24 on 51 murder convictions, 40 of attempted murder and one of terrorism arising from last year's massacre, the worst mass shooting in New Zealand's modern history. He has pleaded guilty to the charges. At a pre-sentencing hearing on Monday, High Court judge Cameron Mander allowed Tarrant's lawyers, Shane Tait and Jonathan Hudson, to withdraw from proceedings at the request of their client. However, the judge ordered "standby counsel" to be available next month in case Tarrant - who appeared in the Christchurch court via video link from an Auckland prison - changes his mind. New Zealand Muslim Association president Ikhlaq Kashkari questioned Tarrant's motives, saying victims could be re-traumatised if the gunman were allowed to spout far-right rhetoric from the dock. "My first concern when I read this was 'Oh my God, what's this guy up to, is he going to use this as a platform to promote his views and thoughts?'," he told AFP. "A lot of people are still going through trauma and this was seen as one of those events that would give them closure. I hope it's not going to be something that will trigger more pain instead."


  • Pakistan says 4 troops, 4 militants killed in shootout in NW
  • Nearly 1,000 U.S. immigration detention center employees test positive for coronavirus

    Nearly 1,000 U.S. immigration detention center employees test positive for coronavirusMore than 930 employees of private contractors running U.S. immigration detention centers have tested positive for the novel coronavirus, according to congressional testimony given by company executives on Monday. The heads of four companies - CoreCivic , The GEO Group , Management & Training Corp (MTC) and LaSalle Corrections - that detain immigrants on contract with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), reported the infections among employees in response to questions from lawmakers.


  • American Airlines reaches out to US senator maskless on flight

    American Airlines reaches out to US senator maskless on flightAmerican Airlines said Monday it had contacted top Republican Senator Ted Cruz about its coronavirus prevention policies after a photo of the Texas lawmaker without a mask on a flight went viral on social media. "While our policy does not apply while eating or drinking, we have reached out to Senator Cruz to affirm the importance of this policy as part of our commitment to protecting the health and safety of the traveling public," AA said in a statement. Aides to Cruz told US media that he was drinking a coffee at the time the photo was snapped.


  • A squirrel tested positive for the bubonic plague in Colorado. Are people at risk?

    A squirrel tested positive for the bubonic plague in Colorado. Are people at risk?The bacteria that causes the bubonic plague is naturally occurring in Colorado.


  • Man, 37, who died from coronavirus had dismissed pandemic ‘hype’ on Facebook

    Man, 37, who died from coronavirus had dismissed pandemic ‘hype’ on FacebookAn Ohio man who died of Covid-19 had repeatedly posted on Facebook about his scepticism of the outbreak – and a tweet containing a montage of his posts is now going viral.Richard Rose, 37, died at home in Port Clinton on 4 July just days after he tested positive for Covid-19. The montage of his posts spreading on social media, which has been viewed 3.5 million times, shows that he tested positive and was quarantined on 1 July, when he was already viewing symptoms.


  • South Africa's 9 million smokers were faced with cold turkey when the government banned cigarette sales in March as a coronavirus measure. Now Big Tobacco is fighting back.

    South Africa's 9 million smokers were faced with cold turkey when the government banned cigarette sales in March as a coronavirus measure. Now Big Tobacco is fighting back.Cigarettes have become the top illicit drug, more profitable than cocaine and heroin, analysts told AP.


  • French man accused of molesting hundreds of children dies in Indonesia

    French man accused of molesting hundreds of children dies in IndonesiaFrancois Camille Abello, 65, died in a suspected suicide in his cell in Jakarta, police say.


  • DeVos slammed for meetings with conservatives while school reopening debate rages
  • Couple who threatened Black Lives Matter protesters with guns once destroyed children's beehives

    Couple who threatened Black Lives Matter protesters with guns once destroyed children's beehivesSt. Louis couple Mark and Patricia McCloskey drew national attention in June when they flashed guns at Black Lives Matter protesters walking down their street.


  • Iran blames bad communication, alignment for jet shootdown

    Iran blames bad communication, alignment for jet shootdownA misaligned missile battery, miscommunication between troops and their commanders and a decision to fire without authorization all led to Iran's Revolutionary Guard shooting down a Ukrainian jetliner in January, killing all 176 people on board, a new report says. The report released late Saturday by Iran's Civil Aviation Organization comes months after the Jan. 8 crash near Tehran. Authorities had initially denied responsibility, only changing course days later after Western nations presented extensive evidence that Iran had shot down the plane.


  • Hamburg sex workers demand Germany's brothels reopen

    Hamburg sex workers demand Germany's brothels reopenProstitutes demonstrated in Hamburg's red light district late on Saturday evening demanding that Germany's brothels be allowed to reopen after months of closure to curb the spread of coronavirus. With shops, restaurants and bars all open again in Germany, where prostitution is legal, sex workers say they are being singled out and deprived of their livelihoods despite not posing a greater health risk. "The oldest profession needs your help," read a notice held up by one woman in a brothel window in the Herbertstrasse, which was flooded with red light after being dark since March.


  • German study finds no evidence coronavirus spreads in schools

    German study finds no evidence coronavirus spreads in schoolsSchools do not play a major role in spreading the coronavirus, according to the results of a German study released on Monday. The study, the largest carried out on schoolchildren and teachers in Germany, found traces of the virus in fewer than 1 per cent of teachers and children. Scientists from Dresden Technical University said they believe children may act as a “brake” on chains of infection. Prof Reinhard Berner, the head of pediatric medicine at Dresden University Hospital and leader of the study, said the results suggested the virus does not spread easily in schools. “It is rather the opposite,” Prof Berner told a press conference. “Children act more as a brake on infection. Not every infection that reaches them is passed on.” The study tested 2,045 children and teachers at 13 schools — including some where there have been cases of the virus. But scientists found antibodies in just 12 of those who took part. “This means that the degree of immunization in the group of study participants is well below 1 per cent and much lower then we expected,” said Prof Berner. “This suggests schools have not developed into hotspots.” The study was carried out at schools in three different districts in the region of Saxony.


  • Michigan partygoers test positive for COVID-19 after July 4th lake bash; 43 cases tied to house party

    Michigan partygoers test positive for COVID-19 after July 4th lake bash; 43 cases tied to house party“This is a very clear example of how quickly this virus spreads,” a Michigan health official said after 43 COVID-19 cases were tied to a house party.


  • Iranian officials urged to unite after nuclear plant blast

     Iranian officials urged to unite after nuclear plant blastIran’s supreme leader has addressed the country’s parliament amid growing divisions and unanswered questions over the explosion at the Natanz nuclear facility earlier this month.


  • Trump confirms he ordered a cyberattack on a notorious Russian troll farm during the 2018 midterms

    Trump confirms he ordered a cyberattack on a notorious Russian troll farm during the 2018 midtermsTrump confirms the US launched a cyberattack on the Internet Research Agency, an infamous Russian troll farm, during the 2018 midterm elections.


  • Police officer allegedly pointed gun at handcuffed black man’s head after he refused to give his identity

    Police officer allegedly pointed gun at handcuffed black man’s head after he refused to give his identityA sergeant in a Florida Sheriff’s office has been arrested and fired after he allegedly pointed a gun at an African American man’s head because he would not identify himself.Janak Amin, of the Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office was fired on Friday and charged with aggravated assault with a deadly weapon, after he threatened the life of a man who was already in police custody, according to the Daily Mail.


  • Xu Zhangrun: Outspoken professor freed after six days

    Xu Zhangrun: Outspoken professor freed after six daysA friend said constitutional law professor Xu Zhangrun was in good health.


  • Woman races across 4 lanes of traffic, dives into canal to save child, Oregon cops say

    Woman races across 4 lanes of traffic, dives into canal to save child, Oregon cops sayThe toddler’s grandmother has been cited for child neglect.


  • Seattle mayor, City Council at odds over 50% police cut

    Seattle mayor, City Council at odds over 50% police cutSeattle Mayor Jenny Durkan on Monday blasted the City Council's plan to cut the police department's budget by 50% and instead proposed transferring a list of functions like the 911 call center and parking enforcement out of the agency's budget. “The community has made clear, they want us to transform the Seattle Police Department and to reinvest in programs that provide this kind of community safety.” Monday's announcement came after weeks of street protests sparked by the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis.


  • Minority U.S. diplomats face bias entering own country - group

    Minority U.S. diplomats face bias entering own country - groupRetired U.S. diplomats on Monday accused the Customs and Border Patrol of a "deeply troubling pattern" of discrimination and harassment against Black, Hispanic and other minority members re-entering their own country. The American Academy of Diplomacy, which groups former U.S. officials in international affairs, urged Secretary of State Mike Pompeo in a letter to order a review of incidents, "ensure equal treatment" of minority U.S. diplomats and make clear their mistreatment is "unacceptable."


  • Barack Obama’s Presidential Library Hits a Major Roadblock

    Barack Obama’s Presidential Library Hits a Major RoadblockThe roughly $500 million project, which will be set in Chicago’s Jackson Park, is facing new demands by the Illinois State Historic Preservation Office


  • Do children spread coronavirus? What doctors say about going back to school

    Do children spread coronavirus? What doctors say about going back to schoolEvidence suggests that children aren't as susceptible as adults to COVID-19, but the risks aren't the same for all young people.


  • Firefighters battle massive blaze on US navy ship after explosion in San Diego

    Firefighters battle massive blaze on US navy ship after explosion in San DiegoFirefighters were battling a massive blaze on a US navy amphibious assault ship in San Diego, California, on Sunday night. The fire erupted after an explosion on the USS Bonhomme Richard shortly before 9am local time. Ariel photographs showed giant plumes of smoke billowing out from the ship, which was docked in its home port. The reasons for the blaze, which was caused by fuel catching fire, remained unclear. There was no suggestion of terrorism being involved. Emergency services cleared the area as firefighters moved in to try to bring the fire under control. According to the San Diego Fire Department, 17 sailors and four civilians required hospital treatment for minor injuries, including one for smoke inhalation. Krishna Jackson, the base's public information officer, said none of the injuries was life-threatening.


  • Fact check: Trump campaign accused of T-shirt design with similarity to Nazi eagle

    Fact check: Trump campaign accused of T-shirt design with similarity to Nazi eagleA Trump campaign shirt is being criticized for having a design resembling a Nazi eagle. But there are uses of eagle imagery by the U.S. government.


  • Florida man crashes car into church and sets fire to building with parishioners inside

    Florida man crashes car into church and sets fire to building with parishioners insideA Florida man was arrested on Saturday after crashing his car into a Catholic church and then setting the building on fire with parishioners still inside, officials said.The Marion County Sheriff’s office said that Steven Shields deliberately drove his vehicle through the doors of the Queen of Peace Catholic Church in Ocala at 7.30am as the congregation prepared for Mass.


  • Kamala Harris Was in Biden Circle of Trust. Then Came Debate Night.

    Kamala Harris Was in Biden Circle of Trust. Then Came Debate Night.Kamala Harris was mad as hell.It was September 2011, the first year of her first term as California’s attorney general. The nation was still struggling to regain its economic footing after the Great Recession, and Harris was under intense pressure from the banking industry, the Department of Justice, and most of her fellow state attorneys general to accept a billion-dollar settlement from the mortgage-financing industry that would immunize them from investigations into other potential crimes committed in advance of the the subprime mortgage crisis. And she was not having it.“This was insane,” Harris wrote in her pre-presidential memoir The Truths We Hold: An American Journey. “We hadn’t even finished the investigation, so we didn’t know what crimes we might uncover!”California had more foreclosures in the wake of the subprime-mortgage collapse than any other state, and was home to seven of the 10 cities hit hardest by the crisis. Harris hoped to use the state’s clout to force the banks to drop the proposed settlement, giving her office a longer runway to investigate more malfeasance.“There’s no way I’m taking this offer,” Harris told her team after a meeting in Washington, D.C., with the general counsels of the nation’s largest lenders. The next week, she announced that the proposed deal would “excuse conduct that has not been adequately investigated” without providing the relief that California homeowners desperately needed.Then the phone calls began.Friends, advisers, White House officials and even Gov. Jerry Brown warned her that she had made too powerful an enemy.“The pressure was intense—and constant—and it was coming from all sides: from longtime allies and longtime adversaries and everyone in between,” Harris recalled in her memoir.Only a few other state attorneys general, equally dissatisfied with the settlement’s proposed terms, supported Harris in holding out for more money and more time to investigate wrongdoing: Martha Coakley of Massachusetts, Catherine Cortez Masto of Nevada, Eric Schneiderman of New York, and Beau Biden of Delaware.Biden, the crown prince of the Diamond State, was in his second term as Delaware’s attorney general, and had every reason to follow Justice’s lead on the settlement. The foreclosure crisis hadn’t hit Delaware nearly as badly as California, and the state’s friendly corporate arbitration system and even friendlier tax structure had made it a haven for the big banks.“But that wasn’t who Beau was,” Harris later wrote. Biden opened his own investigation into the mortgage-financing industry as the settlement stalled, and began sharing the resultant information with Harris’ office—and “became an incredible friend and colleague” as a result.“There were periods, when I was taking heat, when Beau and I talked every day, sometimes multiple times a day,” Harris recalled in The Truths We Hold. “We had each other’s backs.”“That’s really where the two of them started to bond,” said Doug Gansler, a close friend of Beau’s and the former attorney general of neighboring Maryland who served as the president of the National Association of Attorneys General at the time. “She was sort of an instant rock star, as Beau was. They were destined to get together and collaborate.”Harris’ holdout over the National Mortgage Settlement—which ended with a $20 billion victory for Harris instead of the $4 billion initially proposed by the banks, and more money for Delawareans, as well—was the beginning of what would be a close friendship between two rising stars in the Democratic Party. That friendship, cut short by Beau’s death from brain cancer in 2015, is now under renewed focus as former Vice President Joe Biden, Beau’s father and the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee, whittles down his list of potential running mates, a list at which Harris sits near the top.VP Jockeying Season Is Upon Us“Short of personal friendship with Dr. [Jill] Biden, there is no bigger credit that you can have with the vice president than a relationship with Beau,” said one source close to the Bidens, who told The Daily Beast that the family, marked by tragedy and incredibly tight-knit after decades in the public eye, would naturally hold anyone with Beau’s stamp of approval in the highest esteem. “He was the heir.”Both were young, telegenic, and bright even by the standards of the occupation, Gansler said, and largely aligned in their political beliefs. State attorneys general tend to break into three categories—workhorses without term limits who have served in the office for decades, journeymen who view the office as a pitstop on the road to lucrative private sector work, and the young legal minds with their eye on the governor’s mansion or the U.S. Senate.Harris and Beau were in the last group, prominent enough that when Gansler was setting up a breakfast for Maryland’s delegation during the Democratic National Convention in 2012, he invited both to be the event’s speakers.“They had the most star appeal, the most mystique, and both were sort of destined for even higher office, in my view,” Gansler said, explaining his choice. “And they both had great stories.”Beyond the mortgage settlement, Harris and Biden worked together both formally and informally on legal issues on their docket, including fighting online child abuse imagery, sex trafficking, and elder abuse in nursing homes. Their friendship eventually included an introduction to Beau’s father, at the time the sitting vice president.Beau’s illness, the severity of which he kept close to his chest until his final weeks, and his death at age 46 hit the tight-knit circle of state attorneys general hard.“We were all rocked by the whole thing,” Gansler said, calling Beau’s memorial service, which Harris also attended, “devastating.”In a way, Biden took the torch from his son in continuing a friendship with Harris, who introduced Biden at the party’s 2016 state convention as having given “so much to our country”—including his son, “my dear friend Beau.”“It is through my friendship with Beau that I truly came to know Joe Biden, not just as a leader but as a person,” Harris said. “I say from my personal experience that the Biden family truly represents our nation's highest ideals—a powerful belief in the nobility of public service.”America Mourns at Beau Biden's FuneralHarris was elected to the U.S. Senate that year with the help of Vice President Biden’s endorsement over her Democratic challenger—“Beau always supported her,” Biden said in a statement announcing his endorsement, “and I’m proud to support her candidacy for the United States Senate”—and joined the judiciary committee that Biden had once chaired.“They obviously weren’t as close as she and Beau were,” a friend of the family told The Daily Beast. “But she’d been welcomed into the fold, and that’s basically forever with the Bidens.”But that relationship was changed—perhaps irrevocably, some close to Biden said—during the June 2019 Democratic presidential debate, when Harris came after Biden for his record on school busing and his friendship with senators who supported segregation.“It was hurtful to hear you talk about the reputations of two United States senators who built their reputations and career on the segregation of race in this country,” Harris said during the debate, the first of the cycle. “And it was not only that, but you also worked with them to oppose busing. And, you know, there was a little girl in California who was part of the second class to integrate her public schools, and she was bused to school every day. And that little girl was me.”In the context of other broadsides against Biden during subsequent debates—Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts accusing him of running in the “wrong presidential primary,” Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey mocking his position on marijuana legalization as only making sense if he’d been “high”—the moment was comparatively tame.But it was the first moment of genuine conflict between the Democrats vying for the nomination, and came at a particularly sensitive time for the Biden clan, as President Donald Trump was injecting himself into the primary largely by attacking Biden’s younger son with baseless accusations of corruption.As a result, in both the public imagination and in the hearts of Biden’s most dedicated supporters, the dispute has been hard to shake.“If there was anyone on that stage that night that Joe Biden probably felt he trusted the most, it was her,“ said John Morgan, a Florida attorney and one of Biden’s top fundraisers. “And she was the one he could trust the least.”Morgan told The Daily Beast that Harris’ debate performance in June 2019 is disqualifying for any potential running mate, and said that he found it “impossible” to imagine that Dr. Jill Biden would support Harris’ selection in light of what he called her “treacherous” performance after becoming so close with Beau.“She didn’t stab him in the back—she stabbed him in the heart,” Morgan said.Harris defended both her friendship with Beau and her line of attack in an appearance on The Breakfast Club radio show, calling him “an incredible person, an incredible human being and a very dear friend to me,” but saying that their friendship was “separate from the fact that segregationists in the United States Senate stood, and lived their careers, to segregate the races in public education in the United States.”Although Biden was at first surprised by the attack, telling CNN that “I wasn’t prepared for the person coming at me the way she came at me,” he later made light of the exchange in the moments before the next debate, telling Harris to “go easy on me, kid” with an avuncular smile.“I’m not good at keeping hard feelings,” Biden told reporters at a campaign stop in December, one day after Harris dropped out of the race. A source close to the campaign told The Daily Beast that Biden was one of the first to call her after she withdrew her candidacy, a conversation that was characterized as warm.During a digital fundraiser that raised $3.5 million for the campaign last month, Biden called Harris a “principled leader,” and returned to her friendship with his late son.“You said, ‘I love you, and I loved Beau’—I won’t forget that,” Biden said.As Harris has begun the vetting process, the California senator has literally laughed off questions about the exchange and whether it could break her chances of joining Biden on the ticket.“It was a debate!” Harris told Late Show host Stephen Colbert in June, laughingly repeating herself. “We all have family members or friends with whom we have disagreements—that doesn’t overcome or overshadow the commonalities between us or the connections between us.”But some in Biden’s circle, and in the Biden family, have been slower to warm to Harris after the “little girl” moment. A source close to the Bidens told The Daily Beast that Valerie Biden Owens, the vice president’s sister and longtime adviser, is still “chilly” on Harris, and that Dr. Jill Biden was privately flippant when Harris endorsed her husband in March.Joe Biden Asked Kamala Harris to ‘Go Easy on Me.’ Neither She Nor Anyone Else Did.At an Illinois fundraiser eight months later, Dr. Jill Biden still seemed wounded.“Our son, Beau, spoke so highly of her and how great she was,” she said when discussing potential vice presidential choices with the fundraiser’s attendees. “And not that she isn’t, I’m not saying that. But it was just like a punch to the gut. It was a little unexpected.”The Biden campaign, which is generally loathe to comment on anything pertaining to the veepstakes, told The Daily Beast that the clash’s significance has been overplayed in the 12 months since it occurred, and that the vice president’s wife and sister have deep respect for Harris.“Both Dr. Biden and Valerie have nothing but the utmost respect, admiration and affection for Senator Harris,” said Biden spokeswoman Elizabeth Alexander, in a statement that was previously given to the Washington Post. “Any rumors or conjecture to the contrary are not true and have zero basis in reality or fact.”But those in a position to make their feelings on Harris’ potential as a running mate heard still point to the debate as potentially disqualifying—and note that both Dr. Biden and Valerie Biden Owens hold huge sway in any final decision on a running mate.“I don’t think the emotions of Dr. Biden and Val have softened,” said one source familiar with the Biden family’s feelings on the matter, who allowed that polling on Harris’ utility as a running mate “and the persistent whispering of advisers trying to smooth things over” might change their opinions.“But in the Biden world,” they continued, “it was an ultimate act of betrayal by someone whom Beau had trusted.”Morgan, who like other top fundraisers has participated in calls to discuss potential running mates, told The Daily Beast that he has communicated his strong support for fellow Floridian Rep. Val Demings, in part because he believes she’s “loyal.”“When you’re walking in and you’re guarded, and you’re looking around and there’s all these people onstage and you see one person, you go, ‘well, at least I don’t have to worry about her,’ and she’s the one that pulls out the Uzi, that’s hard to reconcile for me,” Morgan said. “But, you know, I’m Irish—I hold grudges.”When The Daily Beast noted that Biden, too, is Irish, Morgan laughed and said: “He may be a gentler Irishman than me.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


  • Hundreds of Army and Air Force Recruits Have Tested Positive for COVID-19 Since March

    Hundreds of Army and Air Force Recruits Have Tested Positive for COVID-19 Since MarchThe U.S. Air Force and Army basic military training programs have seen hundreds of recruits test positive for COVID-19.


  • After court losses, Texas GOP to consider online convention

    After court losses, Texas GOP to consider online conventionThe Republican Party of Texas said Monday it would consider moving its convention online after several courts refused to force Houston to allow in-person events the city canceled due to the coronavirus pandemic. Hours after the Texas Supreme Court dismissed the party's appeal, the state GOP said in a statement that its executive committee would meet Monday night to vote on canceling a three-day event that would have drawn potentially thousands of people. Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner, a Democrat, said last week that he had directed city lawyers to terminate the contract because he believed the event could not be held safely.


  • Canada and U.S. likely to extend ban on non-essential travel ban - sources

    Canada and U.S. likely to extend ban on non-essential travel ban - sourcesCanada and the United States are set to extend a ban on non-essential travel that was imposed to fight the coronavirus outbreak, although a final decision has not been taken, two Ottawa sources familiar with the matter said on Monday. Although some U.S. politicians in northern states are pressing for the measures to be relaxed, the Ottawa sources said the extension was virtually inevitable given the seriousness of the crisis in the United States. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau earlier told reporters talks between the two nations on the ban were continuing and said "We will have more to say later this week, I'm sure."


  • An Alaska Airlines flight was forced to land when a passenger threatened to kill everyone on board

    An Alaska Airlines flight was forced to land when a passenger threatened to kill everyone on boardThe Alaska Airlines flight from Seattle to Chicago turned around after a passenger became unruly and threatened to kill everyone on board.


  • 1% of US population officially has coronavirus. Experts say real number is much higher

    1% of US population officially has coronavirus. Experts say real number is much higher“This is widespread devastation,” one doctor said


  • Fresh lockdown for 250,000 in Manila as virus surges

    Fresh lockdown for 250,000 in Manila as virus surgesAbout 250,000 people in Manila will go back into lockdown, an official said Monday, as the number of new coronavirus infections in the Philippines surges. Residents in Navotas, one of 16 cities that make up the sprawling capital of 12 million people, will have to stay home for a fortnight, just six weeks after emerging from one of the world's longest lockdowns. "I am not sure if this is a solution, but I am certain that if I do this the number of cases will not increase," Navotas city mayor Toby Tiangco told a radio station.


  • Labour handed initial findings of anti-Semitism inquiry by Britain's equalities watchdog

    Labour handed initial findings of anti-Semitism inquiry by Britain's equalities watchdogA report into Labour's handling of anti-Semitism has been submitted to the party by Britain's equality watchdog, as Jewish campaigners urged Sir Keir Starmer to act on its findings. More than 12 months after launching a statutory inquiry into whether the party acted unlawfully in dealing with complaints, the Equality and Human Rights Commission has handed Labour a draft version of its report. While Labour has refused to comment on its contents, the report will address allegations that the party under Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership failed to tackle anti-Semitism within its ranks. It is also likely to single out leadership figures and senior officials over their role in the crisis, which overshadowed much of Mr Corbyn’s tenure as leader. In a statement released on Monday, the Labour Party said: “Antisemitism has been a stain on the Labour Party in recent years. “It has caused unacceptable and unimaginable levels of grief and distress for many in the Jewish community, as well as members of staff. "Tackling anti-Semitism within the Labour Party is a priority and we are determined to take the further action necessary to begin restoring trust with the Jewish community. "We are committed to cooperating fully with the commission's investigation and implementing its recommendations when the final report is published." Labour will now have 28 days to respond to the draft report, before the EHRC publishes a final version, now not expected until the Autumn. Individuals singled out in the report will also be contacted in order to respond to its findings. The inquiry comes almost two years after the charity the Campaign Against Anti-Semitism (CAA) formally referred Labour to the watchdog over allegations of “institutional anti-Semitism.” Gideon Falter, chief executive of the CAA, claimed that under Mr Corbyn’s leadership the party “became institutionally anti-Semitic,” adding that it “must be forever changed after this episode so this can never happen again. “Those responsible remain in the Party and must be held to account if Sir Keir Starmer is to tear antisemitism ‘out by its roots’, as he has promised,” he continued. “The EHRC's report is a pivotal moment in this corrective process.” His comments were echoed by the Jewish Labour Movement, which said: “We hope that when it is published, it will provide the kind of impartial and independent scrutiny required to force the party to comply with its duties under the Equality Act and toward our members.”


  • Man arrested in kidnapping of Amish woman missing since Father's Day

    Man arrested in kidnapping of Amish woman missing since Father's DayA man has been arrested in the kidnapping of 18-year-old Linda Stoltzfoos, who has been missing since Sunday, June 21, 2020. She has not been found. Police arrested Justo Smoker, 34, of Paradise, Pennsylvania. He is charged with felony kidnapping and a misdemeanor charge of false imprisonment. Linda was last seen at a farm on Stumptown Road in Lancaster County, after attending a church service. The East Lampeter Township Police Department is investigating.


  • Coronavirus: Hotline to report people not wearing face masks set up in US county amid surge in Covid-19 cases

    Coronavirus: Hotline to report people not wearing face masks set up in US county amid surge in Covid-19 casesA county in Ohio has launched a hotline so that callers can report people who do not use face masks, amid concerns over a surge in the number of coronavirus cases across the state.Armond Budish, the executive of Cuyahoga county, announced the service on Friday and said complaints would be managed by county officers and would be forwarded to local health authorities.


  • Nelson Mandela's daughter Zindzi Mandela dies at 59

    Nelson Mandela's daughter Zindzi Mandela dies at 59Zindzi Mandela, daughter of Nelson Mandela, has died, a spokesperson for the African National Congress said on Monday. She was 59.


  • AP FACT CHECK: Trump team's false comfort on schools, virus

    AP FACT CHECK: Trump team's false comfort on schools, virusPresident Donald Trump's aides are misrepresenting the record on kids and the coronavirus as they push for schools to reopen. White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany on Monday inaccurately characterized what the chief of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has said on the matter. A day earlier, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos also was wrong in stating that the research shows there is no danger “in any way” if kids are in school.


  • International students denied U.S. entry under new visa rules - court documents

    International students denied U.S. entry under new visa rules - court documentsInternational students have already been denied entry to the United States under new Trump administration rules that bar them from the country if their schools hold all classes online amid the coronavirus pandemic, according to a court document filed on Sunday. The "friend of the court" brief, written by dozens of universities and colleges, was filed in support of a lawsuit brought by Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) seeking to block immigration rules issued on July 6 that blindsided academic institutions across the country. The brief said U.S. immigration authorities were "already preventing returning students from re-entering the country" and cited the case of a DePaul University student returning from South Korea who was denied at San Francisco International Airport.


  • Japan is 'shocked' and furious at the US after a major coronavirus outbreak at 2 Marine bases in Okinawa — and says the US is not taking the virus seriously

    Japan is 'shocked' and furious at the US after a major coronavirus outbreak at 2 Marine bases in Okinawa — and says the US is not taking the virus seriously"We now have strong doubts that the US military has taken adequate disease prevention measures," Okinawa governor Denny Tamaki said.


  • The governor’s shifting message. Is it a herd immunity policy? And the Miami Herald’s new owner

    The governor’s shifting message. Is it a herd immunity policy? And the Miami Herald’s new ownerIt’s Monday, July 13. Disney World has reopened and Florida hit two more milestones.


  • Royal descendants can keep temple full of riches, rules Indian Supreme Court

    Royal descendants can keep temple full of riches, rules Indian Supreme CourtOne of the vaults in Kerala's Sri Padmanabhaswamy Temple contained $20bn (£16bn) worth of diamonds.