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  • For Trump’s faithful, the Supreme Court ‘game’ brings excitement as protests spark fear

    For Trump’s faithful, the Supreme Court ‘game’ brings excitement as protests spark fearThe White House is preparing to backstop any lawsuits tied to the election with a 6-3 majority in the country's highest court.


  • An NYPD officer and US Army reservist has been arrested and accused of spying on Tibetan New Yorkers for China

    An NYPD officer and US Army reservist has been arrested and accused of spying on Tibetan New Yorkers for ChinaBaimadajie Angwang, 33, was charged with acting as the agent of a foreign government, wire fraud, and making false statements.


  • Stranger tries to snatch child from moving SUV outside Costco, California cops say

    Stranger tries to snatch child from moving SUV outside Costco, California cops say“I’d do anything I could to stop him because that’s the worst nightmare.”


  • California's Bobcat Fire not expected to be contained until Oct. 30; 4,000 forced to evacuate

    California's Bobcat Fire not expected to be contained until Oct. 30; 4,000 forced to evacuateUp to 85 structures may have burned, officials say. The blaze has torched more than 106,000 acres and full containment is not expected until Oct. 30


  • China 'coercing' thousands of Tibetans into mass labour camps - report

    China 'coercing' thousands of Tibetans into mass labour camps - reportResearchers warn the "militarised vocational training" can lead to a loss of cultural heritage.


  • I Was Just Denied Clemency in the State of Florida. I'm One of Many People With Past Convictions Living Without My Full Civil Rights

    I Was Just Denied Clemency in the State of Florida. I'm One of Many People With Past Convictions Living Without My Full Civil RightsDesmond Meade, president of the Florida Rights Restoration Coalition, holds a news conference in front of the Orange County Supervisor of Elections, on Jan. 7, 2019, in Orlando. In a cruel twist, they can’t even inform people of the amounts they owe since there is no comprehensive database of fines and fees.


  • Declaration of UN's 75th anniversary urges global unity

    Declaration of UN's 75th anniversary urges global unityThe world’s often-divided nations united Monday to adopt a declaration commemorating the 75th anniversary of the United Nations, saying the urgency for all countries to come together “has rarely been greater” amid global challenges ranging from the coronavirus pandemic to climate change and violent extremism. The declaration, approved by 193 member nations at the mainly virtual commemoration, praises the United Nations as the only global organization with the power to bring countries together and give “hope to so many people for a better world and ... deliver the future we want.” Born out of the horrors of World War II, the United Nations was established to save succeeding generations from the scourge of war — words enshrined in the U.N. Charter.


  • Mexico's drug war leaves 39,000 unidentified bodies in its morgues

    Mexico's drug war leaves 39,000 unidentified bodies in its morguesInvestigation by Quinto Elemento Labs finds alarming number of people buried in common gravesMexico’s militarised crackdown on organised crime has left nearly 39,000 unidentified bodies in the country’s morgues, which are often unable to handle the volume of corpses brought in for autopsies.A new investigation by the investigative NGO Quinto Elemento Labs found that an alarming number of people were simply buried in common graves without proper postmortems. Some were left in funeral homes and more than 2,500 bodies were given to medical schools.“It’s possible that [medical] students are learning with bodies of persons being searched for by their families,” said an article accompanying the report, published on Tuesday. “The forensic crisis has transformed the Mexican state into a burying machine: 27,271 unidentified bodies went from the morgue to common graves – 70% of the total.”Mexico’s militarised war on drugs has claimed nearly 300,000 lives over the past 14 years. Another 73,000 persons have gone missing – with their families often left to search for their loved ones unassisted by the authorities.Calderón sends in the armyMexico’s “war on drugs” began in late 2006 when the president at the time, Felipe Calderón, ordered thousands of troops onto the streets in response to an explosion of horrific violence in his native state of Michoacán.Calderón hoped to smash the drug cartels with his heavily militarized onslaught but the approach was counter-productive and exacted a catastrophic human toll. As Mexico’s military went on the offensive, the body count sky-rocketed to new heights and tens of thousands were forced from their homes, disappeared or killed.Kingpin strategySimultaneously Calderón also began pursuing the so-called “kingpin strategy” by which authorities sought to decapitate the cartels by targeting their leaders.That policy resulted in some high-profile scalps – notably Arturo Beltrán Leyva who was gunned down by Mexican marines in 2009 – but also did little to bring peace. In fact, many believe such tactics served only to pulverize the world of organized crime, creating even more violence as new, less predictable factions squabbled for their piece of the pie.Under Calderón’s successor, Enrique Peña Nieto, the government’s rhetoric on crime softened as Mexico sought to shed its reputation as the headquarters of some the world’s most murderous mafia groups.But Calderón’s policies largely survived, with authorities targeting prominent cartel leaders such as Sinaloa’s Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán.When “El Chapo” was arrested in early 2016, Mexico’s president bragged: “Mission accomplished”. But the violence went on. By the time Peña Nieto left office in 2018, Mexico had suffered another record year of murders, with nearly 36,000 people slain."Hugs not bullets"The leftwing populist Andrés Manuel López Obrador took power in December, promising a dramatic change in tactics. López Obrador, or Amlo as most call him, vowed to attack the social roots of crime, offering vocational training to more than 2.3 million disadvantaged young people at risk of being ensnared by the cartels. “It will be virtually impossible to achieve peace without justice and [social] welfare,” Amlo said, promising to slash the murder rate from an average of 89 killings per day with his “hugs not bullets” doctrine.Amlo also pledged to chair daily 6am security meetings and create a 60,000 strong "National Guard". But those measures have yet to pay off, with the new security force used mostly to hunt Central American migrants.Mexico now suffers an average of about 96 murders per day, with nearly 29,000 people killed since Amlo took office.The investigation found that the number of unidentified corpses in Mexican morgues was 178 in 2006 – the year president Felipe Calderón first deployed the country’s armed forces against drug cartels.That figure soared by 1,032% over the next 13 years to 38,891 , as the murder rate mushroomed.Mexican morgues have routinely run out of space to store unidentified bodies, prompting some local authorities to seek makeshift solutions such as storing bodies in refrigerated trailers. In 2018, a scandal erupted in Guadalajara when the stench of decomposition led to the discovery of a trailer containing 273 corpses which had been parked in a suburban neighbourhood.Stories have also surfaced of workers and neighbours protesting against horrible stenches coming from overcrowded morgues in cities such as Tijuana on the US border and Chilpancingo in the heroin-producing heartland of Guerrero state.The number of unidentified bodies in Mexican morgues has continued to accelerate, even as the current government of Andrés Manuel López Obrador has promised to take action. An additional 4,905 were brought to Mexican morgues in 2019, according to the report.


  • Former Fox News Regular Joe diGenova Claims Network Is Beholden to George Soros

    Former Fox News Regular Joe diGenova Claims Network Is Beholden to George SorosLong-time Trump ally and former Fox News regular Joe diGenova lashed out at the conservative-leaning network on Wednesday, claiming Fox News “fears George Soros” and wondering aloud what the liberal philanthropist “has on” Fox News CEO Suzanne Scott.For more than a week now, right-wing media outlets and pro-Trump pundits have railed against Fox News for an on-air segment that featured multiple hosts shutting down Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich just as he began a conspiratorial rant against Soros—who has long been the target of anti-Semitic tropes from the right. After Gingrich asked if the topic was “verboten,” the discussion ended in a long awkward silence.Amid a growing backlash from conservatives—who felt Gingrich was being silenced from criticizing a right-wing bogeyman—Fox News anchor Harris Faulkner later issued an on-air apology for the segment, describing the former speaker as “beloved” and “needed to be allowed to speak.” Gingrich, meanwhile, authored an op-ed complaining that he was the victim of a “Soros cover-up.”DiGenova, who has been absent from Fox airwaves for nearly a year after baselessly accusing Soros of controlling the State Department, appeared on former Fox News contributor Sebastian Gorka’s radio program on Wednesday to claim Fox is in the pocket of the liberal billionaire. (Gorka, a one-time Trump assistant, continues to make frequent guest spots on Fox Business Network.)> Banned Fox News guest and right-wing attorney Joe DiGenova and Seb Gorka are going all in, alleging that ”Fox News fears George Soros, ” while further theorizing about what Soros ”has on” Fox CEO Suzanne Scott. pic.twitter.com/gWEI8nHBws> > — Zachary Petrizzo (@ZTPetrizzo) September 23, 2020Alongside his wife Victoria Toensing—both have served as attorneys for President Donald Trump—diGenova argued that Faulkner personally owed Gingrich an apology for interrupting his anti-Soros tirade, adding that she “didn’t correct the record” and acknowledge that Soros has funded local district attorney races. (Gingrich alleged that “George Soros-elected, left-wing, anti-police, pro-criminal district attorneys who refuse to keep people locked up” was the main cause of violence at protests.)“Let me just tell you something: Fox fears George Soros,” diGenova exclaimed. “I don’t know what it is, I don’t know what George Soros has on Suzanne Scott—the head of Fox—but the bottom line is this: that network is compromised when it comes to Soros!”At the same time, the Trump-boosting attorney applauded Fox News star Tucker Carlson’s recent anti-Soros monologues, saying the far-right host is “strong enough” to do it while lamenting others will not.“But there are other nighttime hosts who will not touch Soros,” he concluded. “They’ve been told not to. I don’t know why they won’t do it. It’s unbelievable!”Fox News came under fire last year from several Jewish organizations after diGenova said on Lou Dobbs’ show that Soros “controls a very large part” of the State Department and has “corrupted FBI officials,” dabbling in the right-wing trope that the Jewish billionaire was a political puppeteer.Several groups called on Fox to explicitly ban diGenova from its airwaves and issue a public apology, citing the network’s decision to bar a previous guest for similar remarks. While the network never publicly declared that diGenova was no longer welcome, he hasn’t appeared on air since late last year.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


  • In apparent play for QAnon supporters, GOP attack ads claim Democrat lawmakers are defending 'sex offenders'

    In apparent play for QAnon supporters, GOP attack ads claim Democrat lawmakers are defending 'sex offenders'For some, harsh attack ads are part of a nationwide “QAnon strategy” that the Republican campaign committee appears to be deploying to exploit the fears and paranoia fueled by the bizarre conspiracy cult convinced that the Democrats are working with “deep state” sex traffickers and pedophiles to sabotage Donald Trump’s presidency. 


  • Kenosha protesters who say they were assaulted by right wing militias are suing Facebook for hosting a 'Kenosha Guard' page

    Kenosha protesters who say they were assaulted by right wing militias are suing Facebook for hosting a 'Kenosha Guard' pageThe lawsuit challenges the precedent of Section 230, a federal law that shields platforms like Facebook from being held liable for users' posts.


  • Operation Warp Speed advisers held investments in COVID vaccine firms, records show

    Operation Warp Speed advisers held investments in COVID vaccine firms, records showFormer pharmaceutical officials now guiding White House vaccine efforts held stocks, raising questions on conflict of interest


  • Only in Arizona: Bobcats clinging to a saguaro cactus caught on camera

    Only in Arizona: Bobcats clinging to a saguaro cactus caught on camera"At first, obviously, it was exciting to see them but then I kind of realized, 'Oh they're up there for a reason,' " Mindy King said.


  • France's Macron says U.S. maximum pressure on Iran not working

    France's Macron says U.S. maximum pressure on Iran not workingThe United States' maximum pressure campaign on Iran has so far failed, France's president said on Tuesday, and he dismissed U.S. efforts to restore U.N. sanctions against Tehran because Washington had left the 2015 nuclear deal. "The maximum pressure strategy, which has been under way for several years, has not at this stage made it possible to end Iran's destabilising activities or to ensure that it will not be able to acquire nuclear weapons," Emmanuel Macron said in a speech to the United Nations General Assembly. "This is why France, along with its German and British partners, will maintain its demand for the full implementation of the 2015 Vienna Agreement and will not accept the violations committed by Iran."


  • McCarthy threatens long-shot bid to oust Pelosi if Dems impeach over SCOTUS

    McCarthy threatens long-shot bid to oust Pelosi if Dems impeach over SCOTUS“She may think she has a quiver. We do too,” he says.


  • Missouri governor, opponent of mandatory masks, has COVID-19

    Missouri governor, opponent of mandatory masks, has COVID-19Missouri Gov. Mike Parson, a Republican who has steadfastly refused to require residents to wear masks, tested positive for the coronavirus, his office said Wednesday. Parson was tested after his wife, Teresa, tested positive earlier in the day. Teresa Parson had experienced mild symptoms, including a cough and nasal congestion, spokeswoman Kelli Jones said.


  • The big fish caught in Xi Jinping's anti-graft net

    The big fish caught in Xi Jinping's anti-graft netThe former head of Interpol, an ex-spy chief and a Xinjiang governor accused of "trading power for sex" are just some of the high-profile officials to suffer spectacular falls from grace in President Xi Jinping's purge of the Chinese Communist Party's upper echelons.


  • House passes temporary funding bill, averting shutdown

    House passes temporary funding bill, averting shutdownThe House on Tuesday night passed a sweeping bipartisan funding bill, averting a government shutdown.


  • Bolton allegedly tried to share details of Trump's Ukraine dealings during impeachment, but the White House stopped him

    Bolton allegedly tried to share details of Trump's Ukraine dealings during impeachment, but the White House stopped himFormer National Security Adviser John Bolton reportedly tried to do his part during President Trump's impeachment hearings.Bolton famously refused to testify during Trump's impeachment trial regarding the president's alleged quid pro quo with Ukraine, only confirming the deal months after the fact. But Bolton apparently did try to divulge some details from his book regarding Trump's Ukraine dealings — the White House just wouldn't let him, an official overseeing Bolton's book's prepublication review said in a Wednesday court filing.Ellen Knight, a career federal official formerly overseeing the National Security Council's records, was tasked with reviewing Bolton's book and making sure it didn't contain classified information, The New York Times describes via the filing from Knight's lawyer. During that process, Bolton requested a speedier review of a part of his book regarding Trump and Ukraine so he could release it during the impeachment trial. Knight's lawyer said at that point, Bolton's memoir The Room Where it Happened didn't have any classified information and Knight was "prepared to clear the manuscript," but White House aides still denied his request.Through her lawyer, Knight alleged that the "apolitical process" of prepublication review was "commandeered by political appointees for a seemingly political purpose." Bolton's book was the only time Knight had been asked to take several "unusual" steps within the review process, and she hadn't heard of predecessors having to do so either, her lawyer said.The court filing comes a week after the Justice Department opened a criminal inquiry into Bolton's book to determine whether it shared classified information. The White House tried to shut down the publication of Bolton's book even after copies of it were already in the hands of journalists.More stories from theweek.com America needs to hear the bad news first A mild defense of Republican hypocrisy on the Supreme Court Trump is the only one being honest about the Supreme Court fight


  • Cindy McCain, wife of the late GOP Sen. John McCain, endorses Joe Biden, following a report of Trump privately disparaging military members

    Cindy McCain, wife of the late GOP Sen. John McCain, endorses Joe Biden, following a report of Trump privately disparaging military membersHer support could make waves in the battleground state of Arizona, where her husband served as senator for more than 30 years, ahead of the election.


  • ‘Super pigs’ can have piglets at only 3 months old. They’re terrorizing US, experts say

    ‘Super pigs’ can have piglets at only 3 months old. They’re terrorizing US, experts say“I’ve heard it referred to as a feral swine bomb,” one expert said.


  • 'Placed intentionally to cause harm': Michigan city closes playgrounds after discovery of 41 razor blades

    'Placed intentionally to cause harm': Michigan city closes playgrounds after discovery of 41 razor bladesThe Eaton Rapids Police Department found razor blades at two playgrounds, prompting the city to temporarily close all parks to ensure safety.


  • Great power competition heats up in the thawing Arctic, and the US must respond

    Great power competition heats up in the thawing Arctic, and the US must respondRussia and China have been busy in a rapidly changing Arctic, and America seems to have barely noticed.


  • UC schools admitted students based on 'inappropriate' factors: State auditor

    UC schools admitted students based on 'inappropriate' factors: State auditorThe University of California “inappropriately admitted" at least 64 wealthy, mostly white students over the past six years as “favors to donors, family, and friends," according to an audit released Tuesday that found hundreds more questionable cases of students accepted to the top UC schools.


  • An all-white City Council voted for police reform — and divided the town's residents

    An all-white City Council voted for police reform — and divided the town's residents“It was just built up to be something it should have never got up to be,” one resident said.


  • 1 officer dismissed from Alton Sterling wrongful death suit

    1 officer dismissed from Alton Sterling wrongful death suitA white Louisiana police officer who assisted in the arrest in which Alton Sterling was fatally shot has been dismissed from a wrongful death lawsuit. Lake used a stun gun on Sterling, a 37-year-old Black man, and helped wrestle him to the ground during the 2016 encounter in Baton Rouge. Former Baton Rouge officer Blane Salamoni shot Sterling six times during the struggle outside a convenience store where Sterling was selling homemade CDs.


  • Marines' 1st-Ever Littoral Regiment Will Include Combat, Logistics and Anti-Air Personnel

    Marines' 1st-Ever Littoral Regiment Will Include Combat, Logistics and Anti-Air PersonnelPlans are moving ahead to form the first-ever Marine littoral regiment, or MLR.


  • Ben Sasse Calls Attacks on Potential Supreme Court Nominee ‘QAnon-Level Stupidity’

    Ben Sasse Calls Attacks on Potential Supreme Court Nominee ‘QAnon-Level Stupidity’Senator Ben Sasse (R., Neb.) on Tuesday hit back at criticism of Judge Amy Coney Barrett, one of two potential nominees to the Supreme Court, connected to her Catholic faith.Barrett is reportedly a member of People of Praise, an interdenominational Christian community organization. A Tuesday article from Reuters questioned whether the group was similar to a totalitarian cult from the novel The Handmaid's Tale, while a story from Newsweek initially asserted that Margaret Atwood, the author of the novel, used People of Praise as inspiration for book's fictional cult.Newsweek subsequently added a correction stating that People of Praise was not in fact Atwood's source of inspiration."These ugly smears against Judge Barrett are a combination of anti-Catholic bigotry and QAnon-level stupidity," Sasse commented in a statement. "People of Praise is basically a Bible study —and just like billions of Christians around the world, Judge Barrett reads the Bible, prays, and tries to serve her community. Senators should condemn this wacky McCarthyism."Barrett is reportedly the frontrunner of the two nominees under consideration for the Supreme Court. President Trump hosted Barrett at the White House on Tuesday for the second day in a row, CNN reported. Also under consideration is Judge Barbara Lagoa, with whom Trump is meeting on Friday.Trump will announce his nominee at 5 p.m. this coming Saturday. Senate Republicans are planning to hold a confirmation vote on the nominee by the end of October, according to the Associated Press. Of the 53 Republican senators, only Lisa Murkowski of Alaska and Susan Collins of Maine have indicated they would not vote to confirm a justice before the November elections.


  • Why Biden is stiff-arming the left on court-packing and the filibuster

    Why Biden is stiff-arming the left on court-packing and the filibusterThe Democratic nominee sees political upside in his old-school institutionalism.


  • A man didn’t like being arrested, so he fought back — through a Florida deputy’s pants

    A man didn’t like being arrested, so he fought back — through a Florida deputy’s pantsOuch. Pass the Neosporin.


  • The DOJ is reportedly narrowing the focus of its antitrust case against Google to the company's search dominance

    The DOJ is reportedly narrowing the focus of its antitrust case against Google to the company's search dominanceThe new, narrower focus reflected political disagreements between the DOJ and state attorneys general, according to The New York Times.


  • Mark Zuckerberg claims he's 'probably been the most outspoken CEO in the country' against Trump

    Mark Zuckerberg claims he's 'probably been the most outspoken CEO in the country' against TrumpIn leaked audio recordings from internal Facebook meetings obtained by The Verge, founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg can be heard attempting to juggle the calls from his generally liberal-leaning employees to take a harder line against the Trump administration and complaints about censorship of posts from the site's more conservative user base.Zuckerberg's comments weren't too far off from those he's made publicly, and he maintained his belief that Facebook has to "take into account that there are different views on different things, and that if someone disagrees with a view, that doesn't necessarily mean that they're hateful or have bad intent."In one recording, Facebook's chief operating officer Sheryl Sandberg can be heard echoing this sentiment to the company's incoming interns, telling them "what we do is really try not to take a point of view" and explaining that she doesn't let her own "very strong point of view on this president ... enter into my judgments when I'm doing policy changes."At the same time, Zuckerberg, at one company Q&A session in July, addressed employees' concerns that he might be too soft on Trump. "I think I've probably been the most outspoken CEO in the country against — on the many things that I disagree with this president on," he said, citing his disapproval of Trump's stances on immigration and climate change, as well as his "divisive and inflammatory rhetoric, that I've called disgusting." Read more at The Verge.More stories from theweek.com America needs to hear the bad news first A mild defense of Republican hypocrisy on the Supreme Court Trump is the only one being honest about the Supreme Court fight


  • Leaked files reveal Chelsea owner Roman Abramovich is major donor to Israeli settler group

    Leaked files reveal Chelsea owner Roman Abramovich is major donor to Israeli settler groupRoman Abramovich, the owner of Chelsea football club, has been revealed as the main donor of an Israeli settler group accused of ejecting Palestinians from their homes in East Jerusalem. An investigation by BBC Arabic found that four companies owned or controlled by Mr Abramovich have donated more than $100m (£77m) to Elad, a pro-settler organisation with links to the eviction of Palestinian families from the Silwan neighbourhood. Settlements in East Jerusalem and the West Bank are controversial as many countries, including Britain, say they are a breach of international law - though Israel and the United States dispute this. The British government has previously warned Israel against settler expansion in East Jerusalem as it presents "an obstacle to peace." BBC Arabic said it has seen evidence that Elad has funded the eviction process of a number of Palestinian families, including the Sumarin family, which has lived in the area since the 1950s. A spokesman for Elad told the BBC that it abides by the laws and regulations set by the Israeli government for non-profit organisations. Elad also runs archaeological digs at its City of David site in Silwan, which it uses to educate the public about Jerusalem’s Jewish history. It's estimated that 450 Israeli settlers live in Silwan, along with 20,000 Palestinians, but the settler population is gradually increasing. The funding for Elad was disclosed after BuzzFeed News obtained a massive leak of financial data, known as the FinCEN files, that was then shared with other major news organisations such as the BBC.


  • Office of the Special Counsel investigating Betsy DeVos over Fox News appearance: report

    Office of the Special Counsel investigating Betsy DeVos over Fox News appearance: reportYet another top Trump administration official is being investigated for potentially violating federal law


  • Grand jury could provide 'Justice for Breonna' – or exonerate the officers who shot her

    Grand jury could provide 'Justice for Breonna' – or exonerate the officers who shot herIf the Breonna Taylor cases goes to a grand jury, at least nine of 12 jurors must vote to return an indictment against any of three officers involved.


  • Seoul: Missing South Korean official may be in North Korea

    Seoul: Missing South Korean official may be in North KoreaA South Korean official who disappeared off a government ship near the disputed sea boundary with North Korea this week may be in North Korea, South Korea's Defense Ministry said Wednesday. The Defense Ministry said in a statement it had information that the missing official was on North Korean shores on Tuesday afternoon. The ministry said officials will contact North Korea to ask about the missing official and take other steps to find more details.


  • U.S. House Democrats unveil democracy protection package aimed at Trump

    U.S. House Democrats unveil democracy protection package aimed at TrumpDemocrats in the U.S. Congress on Wednesday unveiled a new package of democratic reforms aimed at President Donald Trump, saying it would curb future presidential abuse and protect U.S. elections against foreign interference. Less than six weeks before the Nov. 3 election, top Democrats in the House of Representatives said they expect to consider the "Protecting Our Democracy Act" next year, when they hope to have Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden in the White House and a Democratic majority controlling the Senate. "I think these reforms will have bipartisan support next year," House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff told a news conference, saying that the current Republican-controlled Senate led by Senator Mitch McConnell would not be expected to consider such a measure.


  • Norfolk Shipyard CO Is 4th Navy Leader to Be Fired in a Month

    Norfolk Shipyard CO Is 4th Navy Leader to Be Fired in a MonthCapt. Kai Torkelson was relieved of command by Vice Adm. Bill Galinis, according to a Navy news release.


  • A 90-year-old drove away from home Tuesday morning. Police found him Wednesday afternoon

    A 90-year-old drove away from home Tuesday morning. Police found him Wednesday afternoonWEDNESDAY AFTERNOON UPDATE: Miami-Dade Police announced on Twitter at 2:28 p.m. Wednesday that Leung had been found.


  • Tesla's network appeared to briefly go down, forcing some frustrated car owners to use physical keys instead of their phones

    Tesla's network appeared to briefly go down, forcing some frustrated car owners to use physical keys instead of their phonesThe outage Wednesday morning meant drivers couldn't pair their phone with their car using Tesla's mobile app.


  • Louisiana trooper who faced firing in Black man's death dies in crash

    Louisiana trooper who faced firing in Black man's death dies in crashA Louisiana state trooper died following a single-vehicle highway crash that happened hours after he learned he would be fired for his role last year in the in-custody death of a Black man.


  • Coronavirus vaccine researcher: 'People will die because of a lack of faith in the system'

    Coronavirus vaccine researcher: 'People will die because of a lack of faith in the system'The clearest way for the U.S. to emerge from the coronavirus pandemic, Stat News reports, is to achieve herd immunity through vaccination. Experts estimate that will occur once 50 to 70 percent of the population is protected. But, as Kawsar Talaat, a vaccine researcher at Johns Hopkins University points out, "the most effective vaccine in the world is useless if no one will accept it."There's a lot of skepticism about a coronavirus vaccine across the political spectrum in the U.S. A new Axios poll released Tuesday showed that only 43 percent of Democrats and 33 percent of Republicans would take a first-generation vaccine as soon as it's available, and the numbers have trended downward rapidly over the last few months.> A stunning and huge problem:> > The share of Americans who say they'll try a first-generation coronavirus vaccine is plummeting. https://t.co/t6WjEMNTYS pic.twitter.com/w19im7SSzz> > — Axios (@axios) September 22, 2020The expectation is that there will be more than one vaccine rolling out over time, so it's possible those numbers would go back up as safety and efficacy become more clear, but there's certainly a disconnect between the public and the government and scientific community on the issue. "I think people will die because of a lack of faith in the system," Talaat said, arguing that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have wavered on testing guidelines, and the Food and Drug Administration has been undermined by the optics of political interference from the Trump Administration. Stat notes that others want vaccine makers to be more transparent about the process.Either way, Talaat said, "you can't talk your way into trust. You need to demonstrate that you're trustworthy, and that the process is trustworthy." Read more about how the pandemic may play out over the course of the next year at Stat News.More stories from theweek.com America needs to hear the bad news first A mild defense of Republican hypocrisy on the Supreme Court Trump is the only one being honest about the Supreme Court fight


  • Trump Campaign Spent Nearly Half a Million on Fireworks

    Trump Campaign Spent Nearly Half a Million on FireworksThe Trump campaign finds itself in an unexpected financial crunch heading into the election’s homestretch: substantially behind Joe Biden in the cash it has on hand despite years of advanced preparation. If the president is looking to cast blame, however, the receipts suggest that it starts with himself.During the month of August, the Trump campaign spent nearly half-a-million dollars on fireworks, almost certainly for the display that was put on over the south lawn of the White House during the Republican convention. That display was indisputably ostentatious—a seemingly never ending stream of lights that culminated in the words “Trump” and “2020” bedazzling the sky above the Washington Monument. But the price tag—$477,000—made the company behind the show, Grucci Inc., the campaign’s ninth largest vendor of the entire month. The campaign paid more to the Long Island fireworks company in August than it spent on legal bills for its top firm, Jones Day, or its top pollster, Fabrizio Lee & Associates. It was well more than half of the $762,826.08 the campaign spent on its entire payroll.Considering how much the Trump campaign brought in during August—$61,750,338—the fireworks expense may seem like a drop in the bucket. But Trump is badly trailing Biden in terms of money in the bank. The president and the Republican National Committee currently have $325 million cash on hand, compared to the $466 million Biden and the Democratic National Committee enjoy.With the map of battleground states i expanding, that means that dollars must be spent wisely. And buried in the Trump campaign’s latest FEC report are other expenditures that suggest the president’s personal proclivities—from over-the-top displays of grandeur to his incessant feuds with the media—are having a literal cost.The Trump campaign did not respond to questions about its August financial report.That same month, the Trump campaign paid $202,911.15 to Harder LLP. The firm, run by mega-lawyer Charles Harder, specializes in targeting media outlets. He’s one of a coterie of Trump lawyers who have concocted lawsuits and legal threats against authors, news organizations, opposing political groups, and former aides whom the president accuses of wronging him. All told, Trump’s campaign has spent over $3.3 million on legal consulting fees for Harder LLP. But that’s just a portion of what he’s spending on lawyers. In total, the Trump campaign has spent more than $11 million for legal fees—about ten times what the Biden campaign has paid for the same services.That’s not the only area where the campaigns’ different priorities are evident in their balance sheets. As COVID-19 has spread, Biden’s team has largely opted against in-person canvassing and campaign events, instead steering resources towards advertising and remote voter contacts such as peer-to-peer text messaging.The Trump campaign, in contrast, has built a robust ground game. And Trump continues to jet around the country to his signature large-scale rallies, events that come with new challenges—and expenses—in the midst of a deadly viral pandemic. The campaign has retained a company called Wellness Coaches to staff its events with registered nurses and lab technicians who can handle COVID testing for campaign and event staff and temperature checks for attendees, according to a source familiar with the campaign’s advance work. The campaign has paid Wellness Coaches more than $675,000 for its services since June.The Trump campaign has also beefed up more traditional aspects of its campaign of late, such as its polling operation. The campaign brought on a new polling firm in August called D13 Strategies. The company was formed in Wyoming in May, lists a Texas P.O. box as its address, and lists no other public information about what it does or who is behind it. The Trump campaign paid the company $257,800 in August, part of a polling services tab that exceeded $650,000 that month.That was less than the nearly $800,000 the Biden campaign spent on polling over the same period of time. And while voter surveys are traditionally activities for which national parties foot much of the bill, the Biden team’s payments to polling companies in August more than doubled its total polling expenses for the cycle.But at just over $1.5 million in polling related expenditures, Biden’s campaign has still spent just a fifth of what the Trump campaign has on surveying potential voters.Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


  • Why the case of a maid who battled a millionaire has gripped Singapore

    Why the case of a maid who battled a millionaire has gripped SingaporeThe case described by some as a "David versus Goliath battle" has stirred up debate in Singapore.


  • Navy releases documents from Cold War loss of submarine

    Navy releases documents from Cold War loss of submarineThe Navy began releasing documents from the investigation into the deadliest submarine disaster in U.S. history on Wednesday, but the Navy said the documents released under a court order don’t shed any new light on the cause of the sinking. The first of the documents released were 300 pages from the official inquiry into the sinking of the USS Thresher on April 10, 1963. The loss of the nuclear-powered submarine and all 129 men aboard during a test dive in the Atlantic Ocean delivered a blow to national pride during the Cold War and became the impetus for safety improvements.


  • Republicans threaten to oust Nancy Pelosi if she impeaches Donald Trump again

    Republicans threaten to oust  Nancy Pelosi if she impeaches Donald Trump againDemocrats could use impeachment to delay Supreme Court nomination


  • My generation is being raised to hate America — it’s time to stand up for our history

    My generation is being raised to hate America — it’s time to stand up for our historyYou can't love what you don't know. When young Americans say they aren't proud of their country, it proves our education system has failed them.


  • Ban on natural hair discrimination passes in House. ‘Everybody should feel empowered’

    Ban on natural hair discrimination passes in House. ‘Everybody should feel empowered’The CROWN Act banning discrimination based an individual’s natural hair passed the U.S. House.


  • Qantas put fully stocked bar carts from its retired 747s up for sale for more than $1,000, and they're already all sold out

    Qantas put fully stocked bar carts from its retired 747s up for sale for more than $1,000, and they're already all sold outQantas packed the bar carts full of wine, snacks, and candy, and sold them for more than $1,000 each.


  • Map: State-by-state breakdown of coronavirus travel restrictions

    Map: State-by-state breakdown of coronavirus travel restrictionsU.S. states and territories are making new rules for travelers. Find which ones across the United States have implemented travel restrictions to curb the spread of COVID-19.