Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines

Alle News verweisen auf die Webseite des jeweiligen Anbieters. Wenn du beim Klicken auf den Link zusätzlich die SHIFT-Taste (Internet Explorer, Opera) oder STRG-Taste (Netscape, Firefox) gedrückt hälst, kannst du die News auch in einem neuen Fenster öffnen.

  • Schiff lobbies Chief Justice Roberts to rule on questions of executive privilege

    Schiff lobbies Chief Justice Roberts to rule on questions of executive privilegeRep. Adam Schiff, the lead House prosecutor, called on Chief Justice John Roberts to expedite rulings on any disputes between Congress and President Trump over witness testimony and documents, if the Senate votes to allow them.


  • Robert Koehler: Serial ‘pillowcase rapist’ suspect was building a ‘dungeon’ before arrest

    Robert Koehler: Serial ‘pillowcase rapist’ suspect was building a ‘dungeon’ before arrestProsecutors in Florida believe a 60-year-old man building a “dungeon” under his home is the so-called pillowcase rapist, who authorities say broke into women’s houses and concealed his face with pillows and towels in as many as 40 assaults in the state since the 1980s.Robert Koehler was arrested on 18 January after authorities say they tied his DNA to samples collected from a 1983 case. The sample also matched DNA collected from several other cases between 1981 and 1986, according to the Miami-Dade State Attorney’s Office.


  • Canada ‘Will Not Stop’ Until It Has Answers on Iran Crash

    Canada ‘Will Not Stop’ Until It Has Answers on Iran Crash(Bloomberg) -- Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland said her government will be relentless in seeking answers from Iran on the jet crash that killed 57 Canadians this month near Tehran.Justin Trudeau’s second in command, speaking in an interview with Bloomberg TV in Davos, Switzerland, said Canada wants a “real, independent” analysis of the airplane’s black box, along with transparency on what exactly happened. She also said Canada is receiving support from allies in pressing on the issue, particularly from the Netherlands and Ukraine.“I am confident we will get those answers because Canada is relentlessly focused on getting them and we will not stop until we get them,” Freeland said.Iran is under intense international pressure to provide full accountability over the circumstances that caused the crash of the Ukrainian International Airlines plane on Jan. 8. The three-year-old Boeing Co. 737-800 was shot down about two minutes after takeoff from Tehran. While nearly half the victims were Iranians, the crash was also one of the worst air tragedies ever involving Canadians. Many of the victims were doctors, engineers and Ph.D. students who represented a microcosm of the northern nation’s immigration policies.Nafta RatificationSeparately in the interview, Freeland also commented on plans to get the new North American free trade agreement ratified in Canada’s parliament, calling it the top priority for the government.The deal, a result of a year of rough negotiations with Donald Trump’s administration, has been passed in the U.S. Senate and is awaiting the president’s signature. It has also been approved in Mexico.Ratification won’t be a straightforward process in Canada, however. Trudeau’s team will need to get the support of at least one opposition party to pass legislation, and expedite debate, after losing its parliamentary majority in October’s divisive election.With all of Canada’s provincial premiers calling for a speedy ratification, Freeland said she’s confident the governing Liberals will be able to win support for the deal.To contact the reporter on this story: Theophilos Argitis in Ottawa at targitis@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Theophilos Argitis at targitis@bloomberg.net, Stephen WicaryFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


  • China virus death toll rises to 56, total cases near 2,000

    China virus death toll rises to 56, total cases near 2,000The death toll from a virus in China has risen to 56 and the number of people infected across the country is nearing 2,000, authorities said Sunday. Fifteen more people have died and at least 688 new cases of the coronavirus have now been confirmed, according to the National Health Commission. Among the new deaths, 13 were in Hubei, the province at the heart of the outbreak, while Shanghai reported its first death.


  • ‘Fox & Friends’ Desperately Tries to End Unhinged Giuliani Interview, Repeatedly Fails

    ‘Fox & Friends’ Desperately Tries to End Unhinged Giuliani Interview, Repeatedly FailsPresident Donald Trump’s personal attorney Rudy Giuliani showed up on the president’s favorite morning program on Friday—and apparently didn’t want to leave.A day after Giuliani claimed on Twitter that he was about to go public with evidence that will reveal the “Biden Family Enterprise made millions by selling public office” when Joe Biden was vice president, the former New York City mayor sat down on Fox & Friends’ curvy couch for what can generously be described as an unhinged, rambling, off-the-rails performance.Giuliani, whose involvement in the Ukraine scandal is at the heart of the president’s impeachment, continually left the hosts of the Fox News slack-jawed as he prattled on and bulldozed right through their efforts to keep him from incriminating and implicating himself.For example, as he claimed he would provide “compelling” evidence later in the day on a podcast to support his wild assertions about the Bidens that seemingly ensnare the entire Obama administration AND Hillary Clinton, co-host Brian Kilmeade wanted to make sure “the State Department and the White House know everything you were doing."Elsewhere in the interview, which was aired in front of a live studio audience, the one-time America’s Mayor dismissed text messages and call logs with shady businessman Lev Parnas and other figures associated with Ukraine, oddly boasting, “How about all those phone records that show that I am a very hard-working lawyer?”Finally, after Giuliani once again repeated his Biden-related conspiracies, co-host Steve Doocy stepped in to wrap up the segment.“I know you could go clear through noon when your podcast starts. Give it up for Rudy Giuliani,” Doocy exclaimed to cheers from the audience. “We’re going to be watching.”The Trump lawyer, however, wasn’t budging, instead saying that he’d only shown the “tip of the iceberg” while rambling on some more.“Rudy, we’re done,” Doocy begged, prompting Kilmeade to add, “We have got to go. The president wants you to continue this investigation?”“Would you like me to give up?” Giuliani replied, before adding, “Would you like me to say OK, Biden can keep his 8 million that he got in bribes. He can keep all the bribes that they got.”Again, Doocy tried to give the signal that the interview was over, telling Giuliani that “we’re waiting for noon” for the podcast. Giuliani, meanwhile, ignored Doocy while asking Kilmeade if he should “give it up” while grabbing his head and awkwardly leaning off the couch.The ex-mayor would continue to steamroll over Doocy’s efforts to go to commercial break so he could get yet another last word in, finally giving it up after Doocy’s fifth attempt to end the interview.Stephen Colbert Grills CNN’s Chris Cuomo on His ‘Friend’ Kellyanne ConwayRead more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.


  • Damaged By Drone Strike: Suleimani's Sainthood Is Now Being Questioned

    Damaged By Drone Strike: Suleimani's Sainthood Is Now Being QuestionedIran’s brand is thinning among the Shi’a and Suleimani’s departure creates breathing room for the Shi’a in the region.


  • Pope backs Iraqi call for its sovereignty to be respected

    Pope backs Iraqi call for its sovereignty to be respectedPope Francis met Iraq's president on Saturday and the two agreed that the country's sovereignty must be respected, following attacks on Iraqi territory this month by the United States and Iran. President Barham Salih held private talks for about 30 minutes with the pope and then met the Vatican's two top diplomats, Secretary of State Cardinal Pietro Parolin and Archbishop Paul Gallagher, its foreign minister. The talks "focused on the challenges the country currently faces and on the importance of promoting stability and the reconstruction process, encouraging the path of dialogue and the search for suitable solutions in favor of citizens and with respect for national sovereignty," a Vatican statement said.


  • Kim's aunt reemerges after years of speculation about fate

    Kim's aunt reemerges after years of speculation about fateNorth Korean leader Kim Jong Un's aunt made her first public appearance in about six years, state media reported Sunday, quelling years of rumors that she was purged or executed by her nephew after helping him inherit power from his father. According to a Korean Central News Agency dispatch, the name of Kim Kyong Hui was included in a list of top North Korean officials who watched a performance marking Lunar New Year's Day with Kim Jong Un at a Pyongyang theater on Saturday. North Korea’s main newspaper also released a photo showing Kim Kyong Hui sitting near Kim Jong Un and his wife, Ri Sol Ju, at the Samjiyon Theater.


  • Photos show how China is grappling with the Wuhan coronavirus outbreak as 12 cities are quarantined and hospitals run out of space

    Photos show how China is grappling with the Wuhan coronavirus outbreak as 12 cities are quarantined and hospitals run out of spaceChinese authorities quarantined people in 12 cities, halting transportation and cutting off nearly 33 million people to try and quell the outbreak.


  • Trump complains his impeachment defense has a lousy time slot

    Trump complains his impeachment defense has a lousy time slotSince being elected president, Donald Trump has tweeted about “ratings” exactly 100 times, according to the Trump Twitter Archive.


  • Female prisoner dies after guards ‘did not stop her being beaten with soap bars’

    Female prisoner dies after guards ‘did not stop her being beaten with soap bars’A female prisoner died after guards did not intervene while she was being beaten with a sock filled with bars of soap, it is claimed in a lawsuit set to be heard in the US.Nicole Rathmann was attacked by another inmate as she lay on her bunk at the Central Mississippi Correctional Facility.


  • Warren Responds to ‘Angry Dad’ Over Student Loan Plan

    Warren Responds to ‘Angry Dad’ Over Student Loan Plan(Bloomberg) -- Elizabeth Warren brushed off concerns expressed in a viral clip of a so-called “angry dad” who argued that her student loan forgiveness plan rewards irresponsible behavior.In a clip shared on an anonymous pro-Trump Twitter account Tuesday and amplified by conservative media, an unnamed man tells Warren that he gave up vacations and saved money for his daughter’s education so that she wouldn’t have debt. “We did the right thing and we get screwed,” he said of her plan.Asked about the clip in an interview on “CBS This Morning,” Warren responded that younger Americans are getting “crushed” by student loan debt, which is roughly $1.5 trillion.”Look, we build a future going forward by making it better,” she said. “By that same logic what would we have done? Not started Social Security because we didn’t start it last week for you or last month for you?”(Disclaimer: Michael Bloomberg is also seeking the Democratic presidential nomination. He is the founder and majority owner of Bloomberg LP, the parent company of Bloomberg News.)This post is part of Campaign Update, our live coverage from the 2020 campaign trail.  To contact the author of this story: Ryan Beckwith in Washington at rbeckwith3@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Wendy Benjaminson at wbenjaminson@bloomberg.net, Ros KrasnyFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


  • Chinese Uighurs in Saudi face impossible choice

    Chinese Uighurs in Saudi face impossible choiceHis eyes brimming with tears, a Uighur student in Saudi Arabia holds out his Chinese passport -- long past its expiry date and condemning him to an uncertain fate as the kingdom grows closer to Beijing. The Chinese mission in Saudi Arabia stopped renewing passports for the ethnic Muslim minority more than two years ago, in what campaigners call a pressure tactic exercised in many countries to force the Uighur diaspora to return home. Half a dozen Uighur families in Saudi Arabia who showed AFP their passports -- a few already expired and some approaching the date -- said they dread going back to China, where over a million Uighurs are believed to be held in internment camps.


  • Military investigating video of Navy members shot through peephole

    Military investigating video of Navy members shot through peepholeThe Navy is reportedly investigating videos found on the website Pornhub that it believes show unsuspecting Navy service members through a peephole in a bathroom.


  • China is Expanding into the Indian Ocean—Here Are Five Things the Indian Navy Can Do About It

    China is Expanding into the Indian Ocean—Here Are Five Things the Indian Navy Can Do About ItTwo emerging superpowers square off. Who wins?


  • U.S. presidential hopeful Sanders surges in early primary states, national polls

    U.S. presidential hopeful Sanders surges in early primary states, national pollsU.S. Senator Bernie Sanders pulled ahead in a New Hampshire poll released on Sunday, bolstering evidence that he is gaining momentum with only days left until voting begins in the Democratic presidential contest. Sanders led a poll of New Hampshire voters with 25% support. Most of the field of Democratic candidates vying to challenge Republican President Donald Trump in the November 2020 election have turned their attention to Iowa, which holds the first contest on Feb. 3.


  • Germany urged to fight anti-Semitism to avoid Jewish exodus

    Germany urged to fight anti-Semitism to avoid Jewish exodusGermany's foreign minister is calling for strengthened efforts against anti-Semitism to ward off the possibility that many Jews decide to leave the country. Maas' comments came a day before the 75th anniversary of the Soviet liberation of the Nazis' Auschwitz death camp and at a time of rising concern in Germany and elsewhere in Europe about anti-Semitism. In October, a man tried to force his way into a synagogue in Halle on Judaism's holiest day, later killing two passers-by before being arrested.


  • The US government will reportedly evacuate its diplomats and citizens from Wuhan on a chartered plane amid the coronavirus outbreak

    The US government will reportedly evacuate its diplomats and citizens from Wuhan on a chartered plane amid the coronavirus outbreakA chartered Boeing 767 will transport US diplomats, citizens, and their families from Wuhan to some location in the US, according to the Wall Street Journal.


  • As defense opens, Trump attorneys accuse Democrats of 'blind drive' to impeachment

    As defense opens, Trump attorneys accuse Democrats of 'blind drive' to impeachmentAttorneys for President Trump opened their defense in his Senate impeachment trial Saturday morning by charging that the case presented by House Democrats was full of “bluster and innuendo,” and that “devastating evidence” would lead to the inevitable conclusion that the two articles of impeachment now being considered have no merit.


  • Photos from the Lunar New Year show how coronavirus turned China's biggest party into a washout

    Photos from the Lunar New Year show how coronavirus turned China's biggest party into a washoutHere are photos comparing last year's celebration — complete with Chinese lions, historical dances, and family time — to this year.


  • Bloomberg Offers Few Details to Back Up Trillions in Spending

    Bloomberg Offers Few Details to Back Up Trillions in Spending(Bloomberg) -- Ask Democratic presidential candidate Michael Bloomberg how he’ll pay for his plans to create jobs, provide health insurance and repair roads and bridges, and you get the same answer: Wait until you see my tax plan.Bloomberg has released almost 20 proposals since joining the race on Nov. 24: $1.2 trillion for infrastructure. $70 billion of federal spending in low-income neighborhoods to aid black homeownership. Another trillion and a half for health care. He hasn’t detailed where the money for the ambitious proposals will come from.If Bloomberg comes out of Super Tuesday among the Democratic race’s top tier, there will be increasing pressure on him to explain how he’s going to pay for his policies, said Don Fowler, a former Democratic National Committee chairman who hasn’t endorsed a 2020 candidate.“There will be a great hue and cry for him to add substance to his proposals and do it very quickly,” Fowler said.Bloomberg’s campaign says that it plans to release further details about the tax proposal as soon as next week and that it will show how he plans to pay for his proposals.That would mean details come out before 14 U.S. states vote March 3 on Super Tuesday, the contests on which Bloomberg is staking his campaign. But until then, voters have only heard him say he supports “taxing wealthy people like me” to pay for a growing list of policy proposals.The approach is at odds with Bloomberg’s pitch -- that his three terms as New York mayor and in building the company that bears his name show he’s a practical problem solver, someone who takes a data-driven approach to running government efficiently.It’s also at odds with his Democratic rivals who often explain revenue streams when they propose big programs. No one does that more thoroughly than Elizabeth Warren, whose plan to pay for her $20.5 trillion health care plan ran 19 pages.Not that their estimates have always had pinpoint accuracy. Warren’s and Sanders’s Medicare For All cost estimates differ by $10 trillion. And academics have found Warren’s, Biden’s and Sanders’s revenue estimates from their tax plans overly rosy.The lack of details hasn’t stopped the Bloomberg campaign from rolling out the proposals in his campaign’s earliest days, sometimes at a clip of two or three a week. The media has started to notice, as one recent Associated Press article led off by noting the lack of details about paying for a promise to create millions of new jobs.Bloomberg’s plans on health care, the economy, climate change and other issues where he specifies costs total more than $3 trillion over 10 years. Many more don’t list a cost.Bloomberg is the founder and majority owner of Bloomberg LP, the parent company of Bloomberg News.His campaign has said it’s hard to determine cost estimates because plans are related, and the cost or savings in one proposal can affect another. But the campaign has consistently said that Bloomberg’s tax plan will pay for the policies he is releasing.Bloomberg himself has said little about his tax plan other than he supports increasing taxes on the rich but not with a wealth tax. He opposes the wealth taxes proposed by Warren and Bernie Sanders, which would place a tax on the fortunes of millionaires and billionaires.In a Jan. 11 interview, Bloomberg said the corporate tax rate cut in the Republicans’ 2017 tax overhaul was necessary for competitive reasons but was too deep, and he opposed the measure’s cuts in income-tax rates.“I’ve said I didn’t need the cut, and that was the money that we needed for infrastructure,” Bloomberg said. “You can expect me to try to rectify that in our proposals.”As New York’s mayor, Bloomberg increased property taxes by 18.5% in 2003 – the largest in the city’s history -- to generate $837 million to plug budget deficits. His poll numbers suffered but he was re-elected in 2005.Other Democratic presidential candidates have released cost estimates and funding sources for their plans in varying levels of detail. Joe Biden has said he would pay for $3.2 trillion in proposals with new and higher taxes on the wealthy and corporations, including a minimum federal levy targeting companies that have reported paying no federal income taxes in recent years.Sanders has said his Medicare-for-All plan alone would cost more than $30 trillion over a decade but hasn’t fully detailed how he’d pay for it except to say taxes would go up while out-of-pocket health costs would go down.Leonard Burman, a fellow at the Urban Institute, a nonpartisan policy research group in Washington, said he would expect Bloomberg “to put out a package where the revenues could cover the costs, but it’s just really hard to tell what it would look like without knowing the exact price tag and the details.” Burman co-founded the Tax Policy Center, which analyzes candidate tax plans.To contact the reporter on this story: Mark Niquette in Columbus at mniquette@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Wendy Benjaminson at wbenjaminson@bloomberg.net, Craig GordonFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


  • In Peru, 'they teach you to be ashamed,' indigenous trans candidate says

    In Peru, 'they teach you to be ashamed,' indigenous trans candidate saysThe first indigenous transgender candidate to run for parliament in Peru says it's time to end the culture of machismo in the South American country. "I suffered, in my own flesh, the consequences of inequality, discrimination, violence and corruption," Gahela Cari, 27, said in an interview with AFP before Sunday's nationwide parliamentary ballot. "I'm an animal-rights advocate, an ecologist and a student leader," Cari told AFP.


  • Seven months detained: seven-year-old is longest-held child migrant in US

    Seven months detained: seven-year-old is longest-held child migrant in USMaddie Hernandez and her father, Emerson, fled crime in Guatemala. After months, her parents says she has changedEmerson Hernandez and his daughter Maddie have withstood hunger and thirst.They’ve been dumped in a threatening border city in Mexico, a foreign country with nowhere to shelter. And, for seven months, they’ve been locked up at what critics call a “baby jail”.The father and daughter have weathered all of this just for a chance at asylum in the United States after they fled a home in Guatemala that’s now overrun with crime.“I don’t want my daughter to grow up in that environment of delinquency. I really am afraid that something could happen to her,” Emerson told the Guardian.Maddie has been detained the longest of any child currently held in family immigration detention across the country, her attorneys say. On 17 January, she turned seven years old at Berks county residential center, a controversial detention facility in Pennsylvania where she has spent roughly 8% of her life.Despite her lawyers exhausting the legal avenues that could get her out, the government won’t release her and Emerson together.A spokesperson for US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (Ice), the agency detaining them, said, “ICE’s custodial determinations for Mr. Hernandez and Maddie have been based on the merits and factors of their individual cases and are in conformity with the law and current agency priorities, guidelines and legal mandates.”Emerson said Maddie has always been strong, but being confined for such a long time has changed her. She’s gone from an easy, smiley little girl to someone who has become violent and throws explosive temper tantrums, according to her parents and an attorney.“Her change was sudden,” Emerson said. “And she says to me, ‘When are we going to leave this place?’”The truth is no one knows. The Flores settlement, a landmark 1997 federal agreement that regulates child and family detention, made it the longstanding rule that kids and families should be released within 20 days. But there have been huge exceptions: Bridget Cambria, a lawyer representing Maddie, said the longest she was aware of a child being held through family detention was 707 days.Emerson and Maddie are desperate to see the rest of their family, Maddie’s mother, Madelin, and her newborn baby, who still hasn’t met his dad. Madelin traveled to the US with a visa and lives in New Jersey, but Maddie’s visa application was denied. She and Emerson made a more perilous journey north last spring, when they went a full day without stopping.“That day was hard for me,” Emerson remembered. “To see that my daughter said to me, ‘Papi, I’m thirsty, Papi, I want to eat,’ and I had nothing to give her.”Madelin said she came to the US because she thought her family would be reunited soon after. But Maddie and Emerson were swept into the Trump administration’s increasingly hardline immigration policies, and Madelin hasn’t seen them since.Last April, Emerson and Maddie finally made it to the US only to be turned back to Tijuana, Mexico, through the Migrant Protection Protocols (MPP), a Trump-era program that returns people across the border while they await US immigration court hearings.Suddenly, they were homeless in one of the world’s most dangerous cities.Emerson called Madelin to say there was no space for them at the local shelter. “I remember that he started to cry, and I did, too, because we didn’t know what to do,” she said.A US Customs and Border Protection spokesperson said around 57,000 people had been subject to MPP, and in October, Reuters found that 16,000 migrants under 18 had been sent to Mexico.At least 816 violent attacks against migrants under MPP have been reported, including 201 cases of children who were kidnapped or almost kidnapped, according to the not-for-profit Human Rights First.On days when Emerson and Maddie found housing with good Samaritans, she rarely went outside because the city was so dangerous.“Tijuana is not a very pretty place, it’s not a safe place,” Emerson said.After two months in Mexico, they got their opportunity to go in front of a US immigration judge in June. Emerson made the mistake of following advice he said an immigration official gave him. He told the judge that he had come to the US to give his daughter a better life, a line that completely discredited his case.There are immigration laws that protect asylum seekers. There aren’t immigration laws that protect devoted parents.The judge gave him two options: he could return to Mexico and, against all odds, continue to fight for the right to come to the US. Or – after all Emerson and Maddie had endured –they could return to Guatemala.Faced with an impossible choice, Emerson opted for the latter because at least if something happened to him at home, his family could look after his daughter and wife. But when he and Maddie boarded a plane, it didn’t land in Guatemala. Instead, they took a long trip deep into the country’s interior, to Berks county residential center in Leesport, Pennsylvania.The family immigration detention facility garnered national notoriety a few years ago after an employee admitted to sexually assaulting a 19-year-old woman who was being held there. Critics have advocated for its closure, and reports of poor medical care and racism from employees have hamstrung the facility’s reputation.But it continues to operate, as it has since 2001.After Emerson and Maddie arrived at Berks, they met Cambria, the attorney who has helped to revive their asylum bid. When the government flew them to San Diego in July and tried to return them to Mexico again, Cambria quickly filed a federal lawsuit to bring them back to Berks, where they’ve remained ever since.That lawsuit could eventually set a major precedent as to whether children can legally be placed under MPP. A ruling in Maddie’s favor would mean other kids like her could sue the government, arguing they shouldn’t be sent to Mexico. (Ice’s spokesperson said the agency did not comment on pending litigation.)But Maddie didn’t come to the US to challenge immigration policy. She’s a kid who celebrated a Christmas and a birthday in detention, without her mom and little brother.“This little girl is not doing well psychologically, we’ll put it that way,” said Cambria. “She’s saying things that are scary. She’s very sad.”Ice has offered for Maddie to leave Berks, but without Emerson. This family separation is legally dubious, and Cambria said it was unprecedented in her experience representing immigrant families.Amy Maldonado, another of Maddie’s lawyers, said Ice could release both Maddie and Emerson at any time, and has done so for families in similar situations.Cambria said she doesn’t know why Ice is treating Emerson and Maddie differently from any other family at Berks. But the detention center is only for parents with children. If Maddie leaves and Emerson doesn’t, he’ll be sent away to another facility for adults or returned to Mexico.Maddie is so young that she thinks of everything she’s gone through as a vacation, and she keeps telling her parents she’s ready for the vacation to be over.“When I speak to her, she sometimes cries and says, ‘Mami, I want to leave already,’” Madelin said.“‘I want to leave already.’”


  • To Combat the Soviets, the U.S. Almost Built Its Own "Skyfall" Nuclear Powered Missile

    To Combat the Soviets, the U.S. Almost Built Its Own "Skyfall" Nuclear Powered MissileThe mistake was narrowly avoided.


  • Hong Kong protesters torch planned virus quarantine building

    Hong Kong protesters torch planned virus quarantine buildingA group of protesters set alight the lobby of a newly built residential building in Hong Kong on Sunday that authorities planned to use as a quarantine facility for the coronavirus outbreak. A Reuters witness saw several masked protesters, clad in black, rush into the public housing block in the Fanling district near to the border with China, and set alight a Molotov cocktail before running out. As fears about the virus outbreak intensify, calls have grown for the Hong Kong government to block the financial hub's border with mainland China to minimize the risk of infection.


  • Inmate charged with murder of 'Britain's worst pedophile'

    Inmate charged with murder of 'Britain's worst pedophile'A prison inmate has been charged with the murder of “Britain’s worst pedophile," police have confirmed.


  • NASA is hiring someone to help figure out how to get Mars rocks back to Earth — and the position pays at least $182,000

    NASA is hiring someone to help figure out how to get Mars rocks back to Earth — and the position pays at least $182,000The Mars Sample Return mission aims to get pristine rocks from the red planet back to Earth, perhaps by the end of the decade.


  • Forget impeachment. Republicans fear Ukraine revelations could spill into election.

    Forget impeachment. Republicans fear Ukraine revelations could spill into election.It’s not impeachment that’s worrying Republicans. It’s the months of steady revelations about the Ukraine saga that could follow.


  • Georgia inmate who came close to execution in 2017 dies

    Georgia inmate who came close to execution in 2017 diesKeith “Bo” Tharpe, 61, died of natural causes Friday, Georgia Department of Corrections spokeswoman Joan Heath confirmed in an email Sunday. In 1991, a jury convicted Tharpe of murder in the September 1990 slaying of his sister-in-law, Jacquelyn Freeman, and sentenced him to death. In interviews with Tharpe's legal team years later, juror Barney Gattie, who has since died, freely used the N-word.


  • French State’s Legal Adviser Warns Macron on Pension Reform

    French State’s Legal Adviser Warns Macron on Pension Reform(Bloomberg) -- Explore what’s moving the global economy in the new season of the Stephanomics podcast. Subscribe via Apple Podcast, Spotify or Pocket Cast.France’s supreme administrative jurisdiction warned there are gaps in the financial forecasts of President Emmanuel Macron‘s pension reform and said that it can’t guarantee the legal certainty of the bills his cabinet approved on Friday.The criticism from the Council of State, which has an advisory role to the government, is a blow to Macron as he attempts a systemic overhaul of the nation’s pension system in the face of mass protests and strikes.It may galvanize the opposition to the pension reform, which had been easing in recent days as the Paris public transport system resumed to an almost normal service and turnout at marches was lower than at the peak.“I’ve never read such a negative study from the Council of State,” Valerie Rabault, leader of the socialist opposition at the National Assembly, said in a post on Twitter.The council’s overarching complaint is that it had insufficient time and “serenity” to guarantee the “legal security” of its examination of the pension bills.“This situation is all the more regrettable because the bills lead to a reform of the pension system that is unprecedented since 1945 and aims to transform for decades to come a system that is a major component of the social contract,” the council said.Regarding the financial impact of the reform, the council had already warned the government that its studies were insufficient. But an expanded investigation that the government submitted on Jan. 15 “is still incomplete,” it said, and more analysis is needed of how the pension reform could affect employment rates of senior workers and the unemployment welfare system.To contact the reporter on this story: William Horobin in Paris at whorobin@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Fergal O'Brien at fobrien@bloomberg.net, Lars Paulsson, Kasper ViitaFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


  • Jeff Bezos’s girlfriend gave Amazon boss’s ‘flirtatious texts’ to brother who leaked to National Enquirer, report claims

    Jeff Bezos’s girlfriend gave Amazon boss’s ‘flirtatious texts’ to brother who leaked to National Enquirer, report claimsText messages allegedly sent by Amazon founder and Washington Post owner Jeff Bezos may have been sold to tabloid newspaper the National Enquirer by his girlfriend’s brother, according to sources quoted by The Wall Street Journal.According to the paper, federal prosecutors are examining messages, including at least one photograph, first sent by the world’s richest man to news reporter Lauren Sanchez, with whom he was having an extramarital affair.


  • India police decommission historic British-era rifles

    India police decommission historic British-era riflesPolice in northern India on Sunday bid goodbye to the historic British-era bolt-action rifles after using them for one last salute during the annual Republic Day parade. The Lee-Enfield .303 rifle was the main firearm of British colonial military forces and, despite being designated "obsolete" around 25 years ago, it has been the main weapon used by police in Uttar Pradesh state over seven decades. "They have been in use since independence (from the British in 1947) and now they'll be replaced by INSAS (Indian Small Arms System) and SLRs (Self-Loading Rifles)," said police superintendent Amit Verma.


  • Will China Invade Taiwan Before the Communist Party Approaches its 100th Anniversary?

    Will China Invade Taiwan Before the Communist Party Approaches its 100th Anniversary?Could it happen?


  • U.S. to evacuate its citizens from Wuhan, China - WSJ

    U.S. to evacuate its citizens from Wuhan, China - WSJThe plane, with around 230 people, will carry diplomats from the U.S. consulate as well as U.S. citizens and their families, the Journal reported, citing a person familiar with the operation. A spokesperson for the U.S. Embassy in Beijing said that on Thursday, the State Department had ordered the departure of family members and all U.S. government employees at its Wuhan consulate, but declined to comment on the report that other U.S. citizens would be evacuated from the city.


  • China orders nationwide measures to detect virus on flights, trains, buses

    China orders nationwide measures to detect virus on flights, trains, busesChina has ordered nationwide measures to identify and immediately isolate suspected cases of a deadly virus on trains, aeroplanes and buses, as the death toll and number of patients has skyrocketed. Inspection stations will be set up and passengers with suspected pneumonia must be "immediately transported" to a medical centre, the National Health Commission said in a statement. The statement said "all departments of transportation" must "strictly" introduce prevention and control measures including screening measures in airports, railway stations, bus stations and ports.


  • Louise Linton briefly posted and deleted a message of support for Greta Thunberg, whom her husband Steve Mnuchin dissed at Davos

    Louise Linton briefly posted and deleted a message of support for Greta Thunberg, whom her husband Steve Mnuchin dissed at DavosAt the World Economic Forum in Davos, Mnuchin dismissed Thunberg as not knowledgable to weigh in on climate issues. His wife took Thunberg's side.


  • Trump complains Democrats pushed his impeachment defense to Saturday. Republicans are actually responsible.

    Trump complains Democrats pushed his impeachment defense to Saturday. Republicans are actually responsible.President Trump is complaining about the rules his own party made.On Friday morning, Trump launched yet another complaint about his impeachment trial in the Senate. This time around, he took issue with the fact that his lawyers will have to begin their arguments in his defense on Saturday, "which is called Death Valley in TV."> After having been treated unbelievably unfairly in the House, and then having to endure hour after hour of lies, fraud & deception by Shifty Schiff, Cryin’ Chuck Schumer & their crew, looks like my lawyers will be forced to start on Saturday, which is called Death Valley in T.V.> > — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) January 24, 2020Looking beyond the getting-old nicknames for Trump's Democratic enemies, there's also a big factual error in his tweet. Democrats didn't overstay their time on the impeachment stage; they were allotted up to 24 hours for arguments on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday under Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's (R-Ky.) rules. And while Democrats suggested stretching that time further to wrap up their own arguments on Saturday and prevent extra-long days for everyone, 52 Republicans voted for and passed McConnell's abbreviated version anyway.More stories from theweek.com Trump is winning the impeachment battle — but losing the war Despite apparent preference for 'moderate' candidate, Iowans back Sanders in latest poll Is Bernie Sanders actually surging?


  • Social worker charged with coercing client into prostitution

    Social worker charged with coercing client into prostitutionA former child services caseworker has been charged with human trafficking, accused of recruiting a mother who was her client into prostitution in exchange for a favorable custody recommendation, authorities said. Candace Talley, 27, of Winslow, New Jersey, was working for the Division of Children and Youth Services in Delaware County, Pennsylvania, when she coerced the mother, whose children were in foster care and whose case Talley was managing, into working as a prostitute, the Delaware County District Attorney's office announced Thursday. Talley drove the woman to and from jobs and took more than 25% of the money that was made, authorities said.


  • Italy Regions Vote in Test of Salvini Surge: Election Day Guide

    Italy Regions Vote in Test of Salvini Surge: Election Day Guide(Bloomberg) -- Investors are viewing a Sunday regional vote in Italy as a key test on how long the rocky ruling coalition of the Democratic Party and the Five Star Movement can survive.The opposition League party led by Matteo Salvini is looking to snatch control of the center-left stronghold of Emilia Romagna, one of two regions voting over the weekend.A victory there would bolster Salvini’s case for snap national elections he’d likely win. It is a popularity contest that’s become even more significant following the resignation of the leader of Five Star, the biggest party in the government.While Salvini’s party continues to ride high in the polls, opinion surveys show support for Five Star has cratered. Here’s what you need to know.Who is voting?About 3.5 million people in Emilia Romagna and more than 1.5 million in the southern region of Calabria will elect governors and regional assemblies.Who will win?In prosperous Emilia Romagna -- a region historically dominated by the left -- polls have shown a virtual tie between the League and the center-left, with the latter holding the narrowest of leads in final surveys conducted before an electoral blackout period.Pre-blackout polls have pointed to a clear lead for a center-right coalition in Calabria.Though less symbolic than the leftist bastion in Emilia Romagna, a center-right win in Calabria would still be notable for Salvini, who fronts a party that once denigrated the south and called for northern Italy to secede.Will the government collapse if Salvini wins?Probably not, at least not right away. The parties backing Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte insist that regional votes don’t have any impact on national politics. But a defeat in Emilia Romagna would be particularly hard to swallow for the Democrats, who might then begin rethinking whether their governing alliance with Five Star is really worth it.Brace for more turbulence in case of a League triumph but keep in mind that the government may actually grow stronger if the coalition parties become weaker. The glue holding them together is, after all, their shared desire to avoid snap elections that would put Salvini in power.What do markets say?Most analysts share the sanguine assessment that, in the short term, the government won’t be directly affected by the outcome of this vote. However, they also highlight the concern that a weakened Conte will be even less capable of carrying out reforms that Italy’s stagnant economy desperately needs.When to tune in?Voting is on Sunday, Jan. 26, between 7 a.m. and 11 p.m. Italian time.Once polls close, Italy’s state-run Rai television will publish exit polls, though it’s possible they won’t immediately point to a clear winner. After midnight, projections based on actual vote counts should start giving a clearer picture.The winner will likely be declared in the early hours of Monday morning and full results will come that day.Must readsItaly Coalition Girds for Succession Battle as Di Maio QuitsItaly Prepares for Prime Minister Salvini: Ferdinando Giugliano\--With assistance from Samuel Dodge.To contact the reporter on this story: Alessandro Speciale in Rome at aspeciale@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Chad Thomas at cthomas16@bloomberg.net, Jerrold Colten, Caroline AlexanderFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


  • Washington State's Department of Transportation Tweets That It Maybe, Just Maybe, Found Bigfoot. 'We Will Leave That Up to You'

    Washington State's Department of Transportation Tweets That It Maybe, Just Maybe, Found Bigfoot. 'We Will Leave That Up to You'A Sasquatch might be wandering near Sherman Pass. Well, at least according to the Washington State Department of Transportation's Twitter account


  • 13 times wild animals ended up in places they shouldn't be

    13 times wild animals ended up in places they shouldn't beA possum recently broke into a professor's office in Australia. It's not the first time a wild animal has turned up far away from its natural habitat.


  • Trade Truce? China and America Have a Small Trade Deal—but Will It Last?

    Trade Truce? China and America Have a Small Trade Deal—but Will It Last?What if it falls apart?


  • Iranian airplane makes emergency landing at Tehran airport

    Iranian airplane makes emergency landing at Tehran airportAn Iranian airplane made an emergency landing at a Tehran airport, the semi-official Mehr news agency reported on Saturday. The plane was en route from Tehran to Istanbul but returned because of a technical problem and landed safely at Mehrabad airport without any injuries to passengers or crew, Mehr reported, citing an official at the Imam Khomeini airport, the departure point of the airplane. The report did not provide any additional details about the technical problem encountered by the airplane, which belonged to the Iran Airtour company.


  • China says virus situation 'grave' as Lunar New Year curtailed

    China says virus situation 'grave' as Lunar New Year curtailedPresident Xi Jinping warned Saturday that China faced a "grave situation" as authorities raced to contain a virus that has killed 41 people and caused a drastic scale-back of Lunar New Year celebrations. The world's most populous country, which is scrambling to contain the disease that has infected nearly 1,300 people and overwhelmed health facilities, is building a second field hospital and closing more travel routes. After more countries reported cases, Xi said at a Communist Party leadership meeting on the disease that China was "faced with the grave situation of an accelerating spread of the new coronavirus" but that the country will "definitely be able to win the battle," according to state media.


  • Here's how Democrats will elect their presidential nominee over the next several months

    Here's how Democrats will elect their presidential nominee over the next several monthsThe Democratic nominee will be officially selected at the DNC in July, but we'll probably know who wins the nomination much earlier than that


  • Democrats are having a field day after Trump's lawyers accidentally made the strongest case to call witnesses in his impeachment trial

    Democrats are having a field day after Trump's lawyers accidentally made the strongest case to call witnesses in his impeachment trialDemocrats are gloating after the president's lawyers complained that there isn't enough firsthand evidence to impeach him.


  • Racist threats rattle students, faculty at university

    Racist threats rattle students, faculty at universityWINSTON-SALEM, N.C. (AP) — Three months after a set of anonymous, threatening, racist, antisemitic and homophobic emails sent a wave of fear through the sociology department at Wake Forest University, the department chairman says he's still waiting for university leaders to announce a meaningful response. Alarmed by what he deemed white supremacist terrorism, chairman Joseph Soares canceled sociology classes for a week. When they resumed, Wake Forest police officers were stationed outside classrooms and the building itself.


  • Philippine President Duterte threatens to end military deal with U.S.

    Philippine President Duterte threatens to end military deal with U.S.Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte warned the United States on Thursday he would repeal an agreement on deployment of troops and equipment for exercises if Washington did not reinstate the visa of a political ally.


  • Frailty of Libya Accord on Display In Merkel-Erdogan Squabble

    Frailty of Libya Accord on Display In Merkel-Erdogan Squabble(Bloomberg) -- Turkey’s Recep Tayyip Erdogan blasted a five-day-old agreement to halt fighting in Libya as he squabbled with Chancellor Angela Merkel in public over the viability of the accord.One of the two main Libyan combatants, Khalifa Haftar has failed to commit to a truce and should be shunned by leaders who gathered in Berlin last Sunday to work toward a more durable cease-fire in the North African country’s civil war, Erdogan said.“It’s hard to understand how some countries recognize Haftar,” the Turkish leader told journalists in Istanbul on Friday alongside Merkel, who came for talks.The frailty of the Berlin commitment was also on display as the two leaders bickered over Haftar’s refusal to officially sign an ceasefire agreement.Merkel acknowledged there had been “individual” violations of the truce in recent days, but said violence overall “has significantly dropped.”Erdogan chimed in, saying Haftar hadn’t signed anything, but only verbally accepted a truce, which isn’t “full acceptance.” Merkel rebutted, citing the verbal commitment and an agreement to put forward five names for a committee to hash out the terms of a more permanent cease-fire.“Madame Chancellor, it’s accepted but not signed, I want to make that clear,” Erdogan responded.“I think we misunderstand each other a bit,” Merkel said, agreeing that there was no signing. “You’re right.”Read More:Erdogan’s Libya Gamble Turns Mediterranean Into Sea of TroublesEurope Mulls Military Mission in Libya, Amid Oil Disruption (1)Warring Libya Factions Agree to Set Up Cease-Fire Committee (3)The parrying between the two leaders illustrates the difficulty of resolving the proxy war, which has seen Turkey and Russia back opposing parties in the struggle and outside nations squabble over energy interests. The Libya conflict has raged for years, killing thousands and disrupting the country’s oil output.Haftar, who has led a months-long march on the capital Tripoli, and Libya’s internationally recognized Prime Minister Fayez al-Sarraj, backed by Erdogan, variously agreed to a truce and pledged to put forward names to secure a more lasting cease-fire.“We won’t leave Sarraj alone,” Erdogan said.\--With assistance from Arne Delfs.To contact the reporters on this story: Patrick Donahue in Istanbul at pdonahue1@bloomberg.net;Firat Kozok in Istanbul at fkozok@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Ben Sills at bsills@bloomberg.net, Raymond ColittFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.


  • Family of five and their dog found dead in NC home

    Family of five and their dog found dead in NC homeA family of five and their dog were found dead Friday in their Vanceboro, North Carolina home, authorities said.