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Science News Headlines - Yahoo News

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  • Tire makers race to turn dandelions into rubber

    A piece of rubber made from dandelion plants is seen at the Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology in MuensterBy Ludwig Burger MUENSTER Germany (Reuters) - Dutch biologist Ingrid van der Meer often meets with disbelief when she talks about her work on dandelions and how it could secure the future of road transport. The reaction is understandable, given most people regard the yellow flowers as pesky intruders in their gardens rather than a promising source of rubber for tires. Her research team is competing with others across the world to breed a type of dandelion native to Kazakhstan whose taproot yields a milky fluid with tire-grade rubber particles in it. Global tire makers such as industry leader Bridgestone Corp and No.4 player Continental AG believe they are in for rich pickings and are backing such research to the tune of millions of dollars.


  • Our life with the Neanderthals was no brief affair

    An exhibit shows the life of a neanderthal family in a cave in the new Neanderthal Museum in the northern town of KrapinaBy Ben Hirschler LONDON (Reuters) - Far from wiping out Neanderthals overnight, modern humans rubbed along with their shorter and stockier cousins for thousands of years, giving plenty of time for the two groups to share ideas - and have sex. The most accurate timeline yet for the demise of our closest relatives, published on Wednesday, shows Neanderthals overlapped with present-day humans in Europe for between 2,600 and 5,400 years before disappearing about 40,000 years ago. Pinpointing how and when the Neanderthals became extinct has been tough because the mainstay process of radiocarbon dating is unreliable for samples that are more than 30,000 years old, due to contamination. The data showed that Neanderthals vanished from Europe between 39,000 and 41,000 years ago - but rather than being replaced rapidly by modern humans, their disappearance occurred at different times across sites from the Black Sea to the Atlantic.


  • Spacewalking cosmonauts launch satellite, set up studies

    Russian cosmonaut Oleg Artemyev attends a news conference behind a glass wall at Baikonur cosmodromeBy Irene Klotz CAPE CANAVERAL Fla. - A pair of Russian cosmonauts began their work week on Monday floating outside the International Space Station to toss out a small satellite for a university in Peru, install science experiments and tackle some housekeeping chores. First out of the hatch was cosmonaut Oleg Artemyev, who stood on a ladder outside the station's Pirs airlock to release a 2.2-pound (1-kg), 4-inch (10-cm) cube-shaped satellite built by students at the National University of Engineering in Lima, Peru. Video broadcast on NASA Television showed the satellite, called Chasqui-1, tumbling away from the back of the station as it sailed about 260 miles (418 km) above the southern Pacific Ocean. Artemyev was then joined by spacewalker Alexander Skvortsov to install a European package of experiments to the outside of the Russian Zvezda module.


  • Specks of star dust likely first from beyond solar system

    Handout of the Stardust Capsule Return is seen from NASA's DC-8 Airborne Laboratory during re-entry into Earth's atmosphereBy Irene Klotz CAPE CANAVERAL Fla. (Reuters) - A NASA spacecraft dispatched 15 years ago to collect samples from a comet also snared what scientists suspect are the first dust specks from interstellar space. The Stardust robotic spacecraft was launched in 1999 to fly by a comet and collect samples from Comet Wild 2 (pronounced "Vilt 2") and parachute them back to Earth in 2006. Before reaching the comet, the spacecraft also twice opened a collection tray to fish for particles that may have come into the solar system from interstellar space. ...


  • 'Mission Blue' film charts scientist's quest to save oceans

    blue_pds_001_hBy Patricia Reaney NEW YORK (Reuters) - From the Galapagos Islands to Australia's Coral Sea and a marine park off the coast of Mexico, the documentary "Mission Blue" navigates the journey of renowned oceanographer Sylvia Earle as she travels the globe to save the planet's threatened seas. With stunning underwater footage, the film that airs on Friday on the online streaming service Netflix and in selected U.S. theaters, shows the devastating impact of pollution, overfishing and climate change on the oceans through the eyes of the renowned scientist, explorer and author who has been charting it for decades. "I really wanted to make people aware of this woman and her life because she is such an incredible person and has dedicated so much of her life toward the ocean," Fisher Stevens, 50, who co-directed the film with Robert Nixon, said in an interview. Stevens, an actor and producer of the 2010 Oscar-winning dolphin-hunting documentary "The Cove," met Earle, 78, while filming her trip to the Galapagos Islands with scientists, explorers and policy makers more than four years ago.


  • Iceland Evacuates Some Tourists, But No Signs of an Eruption Yet

    Iceland Evacuates Some Tourists, But No Signs of an Eruption YetThe waiting and watching continues in Iceland, where Barðarbunga volcano still shows no signs of erupting. Barðarbunga volcano is at orange alert, which signifies a possible eruption and is the fourth level on a five-grade scale. The volcano is in a remote region of southwest Iceland, and an eruption poses no immediate threat to local communities. Barðarbunga is buried beneath the Vatnajökull ice cap.


  • Real Paleo Diet: Ancient Humans Ate Snails

    Real Paleo Diet: Ancient Humans Ate SnailsHundreds of burnt snail shells were found near fireplaces along with tools and other animal remains in rock shelters along a cliff in Spain. The snails probably didn't make up a calorically significant part of these Paleolithic people's diet, but may have provided key vitamins and nutrients, said study lead author Javier Fernández-López de Pablo, an archaeologist at the Institut Català de Paleoecologia Humana i Evolució Social in Spain.


  • Tiny Jurassic Mammals Were Picky Eaters

    Tiny Jurassic Mammals Were Picky EatersIn the Jurassic Period, when dinosaurs ruled the land, tiny mammals probably had to keep a low profile and survive by gobbling any insects they could find, but new research suggests these early mammals may have been pickier eaters than scientists previously thought. "Our results confirm that the diversification of mammalian species at the time was linked with differences in diet and ecology."


  • ABC Developing 'Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth' as TV Sitcom

    ABC Developing 'Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth' as TV SitcomAstronaut Chris Hadfield's down-to-Earth advice is now the basis for a television sitcom. ABC on Tuesday (Aug. 19) committed to the production of a pilot episode for a family comedy inspired by Hadfield's best-selling book, "An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth" (Little, Brown and Co., 2013), Deadline Hollywood reports. Hadfield returned to Earth in May 2013 after a five-month stay on board the International Space Station. His cover of David Bowie's "Space Oddity" was watched more than 20 million times on YouTube.


  • Rats in Spaaace! NASA Wants to Put Rodents on Space Station

    Rats in Spaaace! NASA Wants to Put Rodents on Space StationCall them the "rat-stronauts." NASA is drawing up plans to launch a team of rats with the right stuff to the International Space Station as early as this year. This means there will need to be changes to animal husbandry to keep the rats happy and healthy, said Julie Robinson, NASA's chief scientist for the space station, in a recent press conference. "This will allow animals to be studied for longer period of time on space station missions," she said, adding that of the 35 or so studies where rats have gone into space, few of them have gone for more than two weeks. The actual schedule for launching the rats to the space station and returning them back to Earth is not fully figured out yet.


  • Scientists warn Florida governor of threat from climate change By Bill Cotterell TALLAHASSEE Fla. (Reuters) - Five climate scientists warned Florida Governor Rick Scott in a meeting on Tuesday that a steadily rising ocean was a major threat to the state's future, urging it to become a leader in developing solar energy and other clean power sources. The Republican governor, who disputed the human impact on climate change in his 2010 campaign, agreed recently to meet with the scientists after his main Democratic challenger for re-election this year, former Governor Charlie Crist, proclaimed himself a firm believer in global warming. “I’m inherently an optimist,” said David Hastings, a professor of marine science and chemistry at Eckerd College on Florida's west coast. I’m concerned he might not do anything.” The scientists said they hoped Scott would respond to the Obama administration's proposal to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from power plants by 38 percent in Florida by 2030.
  • Weirdest Worm Ever? Clawed Creature Finds Its Family Tree

    Weirdest Worm Ever? Clawed Creature Finds Its Family TreeWhen researchers first discovered the fossil worm Hallucigenia in the 1970s, they were so perplexed they identified its head as its tail and its legs as its spines. The finding is surprising because it rewrites the evolutionary history of spiders, insects and crustaceans, said study researcher Javier Ortega-Hernandez, a paleobiologist at the University of Cambridge. Most genetic studies have found that these arthropods are close relatives of today's velvet worms, Ortega-Hernandez said in a statement. "The peculiar claws of Hallucigenia are a smoking gun that solves a long and heated debate in evolutionary biology," said study researcher Martin Smith, an earth scientist at the University of Cambridge.


  • In CDC bird flu mix-up, U.S. agency cites sloppy science, failed reporting

    The Centers for Disease Control sign is seen at its main facility in AtlantaBy Sharon Begley NEW YORK (Reuters) - A U.S. government scientist working with bird flu rushed through lab procedures in order to get to a staff meeting, setting off what could have been a fatal mishap, health officials said on Friday. They said the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) lab worker, who was not identified, allotted only about half the time necessary to carry out the procedures safely, and as a result samples of mild avian flu were tainted with a highly deadly strain and sent from CDC to researchers at the U.S. Department of Agriculture. CDC released the report of its investigation of the avian flu incident and said disciplinary action is under consideration. CDC did not report the incident until July.


  • 'Mission Blue' film charts scientist's quest to save oceans By Patricia Reaney NEW YORK (Reuters) - From the Galapagos Islands to Australia's Coral Sea and a marine park off the coast of Mexico, the documentary "Mission Blue" navigates the journey of renowned oceanographer Sylvia Earle as she travels the globe to save the planet's threatened seas. With stunning underwater footage, the film that airs on Friday on the online streaming service Netflix and in selected U.S. theaters, shows the devastating impact of pollution, overfishing and climate change on the oceans through the eyes of the renowned scientist, explorer and author who has been charting it for decades. "I really wanted to make people aware of this woman and her life because she is such an incredible person and has dedicated so much of her life towards the ocean," Fisher Stevens, 50, who co-directed the film with Robert Nixon, said in an interview. Stevens, an actor and producer of the 2010 Oscar-winning dolphin-hunting documentary "The Cove," met Earle, 78, while filming her trip to the Galapagos Islands with scientists, explorers and policy makers more than four years ago.
  • Lionfish's Terminator-Style Killing Alarms Scientists

    Lionfish's Terminator-Style Killing Alarms ScientistsLionfish, an invasive Pacific Ocean species, have been wiping out native fish populations in the Caribbean Sea and Atlantic Ocean for the past couple of decades. Now, research reveals the "terminator"-style approach to hunting that has likely made them so successful: When other predatory fish quit stalking their prey to look for easier targets, lionfish just keep on killing. "Lionfish seem to be the ultimate invader," study researcher Kurt Ingeman, a doctoral student at Oregon State University, said in a statement. Ingeman, who presented his research at the annual meeting of the Ecological Society of America in Sacramento, California, studied populations of the fairy basslet, a common lionfish prey, at reefs in the Bahamas.


  • Rare Sight: Clouds Move On Saturn's Huge Moon Titan (Video, Photos)

    Rare Sight: Clouds Move On Saturn's Huge Moon Titan (Video, Photos)Clouds cruise through the skies of Saturn's largest moon, Titan, in striking new imagery captured by NASA's Cassini spacecraft. In a rare sight for scientists, Cassini captured views of methane clouds drifting across Ligeia Mare, a big hydrocarbon sea near Titan's north pole, from July 20 through July 22. Few clouds had been seen on Titan since the dissipation of a major storm in 2010, so researchers are trying to gauge the significance of the new observations. "We're eager to find out if the clouds' appearance signals the beginning of summer weather patterns, or if it is an isolated occurrence," Cassini imaging team associate Elizabeth Turtle, of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab in Laurel, Maryland, said in a statement.


  • Scientists find how 'nefarious' Ebola disables immune response By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - Scientists studying the lethal Ebola virus say they have found how it blocks and disables the body's ability to battle infections in a discovery that should help the search for potential cures and vaccines. In the largest and deadliest outbreak of the disease yet recorded, Ebola has killed more than 1,000 people in West Africa since March. A group of scientists in the United States found that Ebola carries a protein called VP24 that interferes with a molecule called interferon, which is vital to the immune response. "One of the key reasons that Ebola virus is so deadly is because it disrupts the body's immune response to the infection," said Chris Basler of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, who worked on the study.
  • This Extreme Antarctic Insect Has the Tiniest Genome

    This Extreme Antarctic Insect Has the Tiniest GenomeAt just 99 million base pairs of nucleotides (DNA's building blocks), the midge's genome is smaller than that of the body louse — and far more miniscule than the human genome, which has 3.2 billion base pairs. "It's a pretty exciting fly," Washington State University genomics researcher Joanna Kelley, who worked on the project to sequence the midge's genome, said in a statement. It's the only true insect that lives on the Antarctic continent, and at 0.23 inches (6 millimeters) long, it actually qualifies as the largest terrestrial animal in Antarctica, according to Miami University of Ohio's Laboratory for Ecophysiological Cryobiology. Antarctic midge larvae exist in a deep freeze for two winters.


  • Artificial Rat Brain Gets Pounded in Name of Science

    Artificial Rat Brain Gets Pounded in Name of ScienceThe new brainlike tissue is one step toward creating a functioning brain in a petri dish —  something that is still a ways off, scientists say. The artificial neural tissue also resembles that of a rat's brain, because it had similar mechanical properties, they said.


  • Quantum Particles Take the Road Most Traveled

    Quantum Particles Take the Road Most TraveledFor the first time ever, physicists have mapped the path that particles are most likely to take when moving from one quantum state to another. In physics, a concept called the "path of least action" describes the trajectory that an object is most likely to follow, similar to the familiar concept of the "path of least resistance." For example, a tossed football follows a parabolic arc through the air instead of spinning off in crazy loops or zigzags. However, physicists didn't know whether quantum particles, like electrons, neutrinos or photons, follow the same rule. Instead, they are governed by the weird rules of quantum mechanics that even Einstein called "spooky." [Wacky Physics: The Coolest Little Particles in Nature]


  • Distant Galaxies' Explosions Become Psychedelic Songs

    Distant Galaxies' Explosions Become Psychedelic SongsAn astronomer and a graphic artist have teamed up to turn powerful explosions in distant galaxies into spellbinding music and animations. Known as gamma-ray bursts, these explosions of high-frequency electromagnetic radiation are the brightest events known to occur in the universe. Sylvia Zhu, a graduate student in physics at the University of Maryland, College Park, studies gamma-ray bursts at NASA's Goddard Spaceflight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, using the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. "I figured it would be fun to 'hear' what these explosions might sound like, if we converted each photon into a musical note," Zhu told Live Science.


  • Scientists retract narcolepsy study linked to GSK vaccine By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters - Scientists who believed they had started to decipher links between a GlaxoSmithKline H1N1 pandemic flu vaccine and the sleep disorder narcolepsy have retracted a study after saying they cannot replicate their findings. The paper, originally published in the journal Science Translational Medicine in December 2013, suggested narcolepsy can sometimes be triggered by a scientific phenomenon known as "molecular mimicry," offering a possible explanation for its link to GSK's "swine flu" vaccine, Pandemrix. The results appeared to show that the debilitating disorder, characterized by sudden sleepiness and muscle weakness, could be set off by an immune response to a portion of a protein from the H1N1 flu virus that is very similar to a region of a protein called hypocretin, which is key to narcolepsy. GSK, which has been funding Mignot's research into links between the vaccine and narcolepsy, said in a statement it believed "the original scientific hypothesis remains a valid one that needs to be further explored".
  • Scientists make cheap, fast self-assembling robots

    This undated handout image provided by the journal Science shows a self-folding crawling robot in three stages. In what may be the birth of cheap, easy-to-make robots, researchers have created complex machines that transform themselves from little more than a sheet of paper and plastic into walking automatons. Borrowing from the ancient Japanese art of origami, children’s toys and even a touch of the “Transformers” movies, scientists and engineers at Harvard and MIT created self-assembling, paper robots. They are made out of hobby shop materials that cost about $100. After the installation of tiny batteries and motors, the paper robot gets up, folds itself into the proper shape and is ambling across the table in just four minutes. (AP Photo/Seth Kroll, Wyss Institute - Science)WASHINGTON (AP) — In what may be the birth of cheap, easy-to-make robots, researchers have created complex machines that transform themselves from little more than a sheet of paper and plastic into walking automatons.


  • Robotic helpers? Scientists tout cheap robot that assembles itself By Richard Valdmanis BOSTON (Reuters) - Scientists say they have developed a low-cost robot prototype made from paper and children's trinkets that can assemble itself and perform a task without human help. The technology could eventually lead to affordable 'robotic helpers' for use in everything from household chores to exploring space, according to the team of Harvard and Massachusetts Institute of Technology engineers who developed it. "Getting a robot to assemble itself autonomously and actually perform a function has been a milestone we've been chasing for many years," said Rob Wood of Harvard's School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. The prototype was jointly announced by Harvard and MIT on Thursday.
  • Butt batteries: Scientists store energy in used cigarette filters

    An ash tray with cigarette butts is pictured in HinzenbachScientists in South Korea say they have found a way of converting used cigarette butts into a material capable of storing energy that could help power everything from mobile phones to electric cars. In a study published on Tuesday in the journal Nanotechnology, researchers from Seoul National University outlined how they transformed the used filters, which are composed mainly of cellulose acetate fibres and are considered toxic and a risk to the environment when discarded. "Our study has shown that used cigarette filters can be transformed into a high-performing carbon-based material using a simple one-step process, which simultaneously offers a green solution to meeting the energy demands of society," said professor and study co-author Jongheop Yi. According to anti-smoking campaigners Americans for Nonsmokers’ Rights, cigarette butts are the most commonly discarded item worldwide, contributing more than 765,000 tonnes of waste annually.


  • Scientists ask bird oglers to help study puffins

    In this photo made Friday, Aug. 1, 2014, an Atlantic puffin flies back to its burrow after catching a beak full of small fish to feed its chicks on Eastern Egg Rock, a small island off the coast of Maine. The Audubon Society, which maintains three web cameras on another island, wants bird lovers to contribute research to a project scientists hope will help save Atlantic puffins in Maine. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)EASTERN EGG ROCK, Maine (AP) — Wanted: puffinologists. No experience necessary.


  • For most of us, global warming has become 'normal' climate

    Jarraud, Secretary-General of the WMO, speaks next to IPCC Chairman Pachauri as they present the U.N. IPCC Climate Report during a news conference in StockholmGlobal warming has been going on for so long that most people were not even born the last time the Earth was cooler than average in 1985 in a shift that is altering perceptions of a "normal" climate, scientists said. Decades of climate change bring risks that people will accept higher temperatures, with more heatwaves, downpours and droughts, as normal and complicate government plans to do more to cut emissions of greenhouse gas emissions. "Because the last three decades have seen such a significant rise in global and regional temperatures, most people under the age of 30 have not lived in a world without global warming," Michel Jarraud, Secretary-General of the U.N.'s World Meteorological Organization (WMO), told Reuters. February 1985 was the last month when global temperatures were below the 20th century average, according to the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), a leading source of global temperature data.


  • Japan scientist in discredited stem-cell research dead in suicide

    Yoshiki Sasai, deputy director of the Riken Center for Developmental Biology, attends a news conference in TokyoYoshiki Sasai was the co-author of the high-profile research that had seemed to offer hope for replacing damaged cells or even growing new human organs. He was found dead early on Tuesday at the Riken institute where he worked in Kobe, Japan, police and the institute said. "It was a hanging." Sasai, 52, had been hospitalised in March for stress and become less receptive to media inquiries during the controversy over the team's research, Riken spokesman Satoru Kagaya said. As deputy director of Riken's Center for Developmental Biology, Sasai supervised the work of lead author Haruko Obokata, which took the world of molecular biology by storm when it was published in the British journal Nature in January.


  • Giant Electromagnet Moves to Permanent Home at Fermilab

    Giant Electromagnet Moves to Permanent Home at FermilabA giant but delicate electromagnet has finally moved into its custom-made home in Illinois, a year after completing a cautious voyage from New York over land and sea. Last week, the 50-foot-wide (15 meters) centerpiece of the Muon g-2 particle physics experiment was transferred to a new building at the U.S. Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, or Fermilab, in Batavia, Illinois, a suburb of Chicago. Once housed at Brookhaven National Lab on Long Island, the ring-shaped electromagnet made its $3-million move to Batavia last summer. After the electromagnet arrived in port in Lemont, Illinois, a police-escorted caravan brought the strange cargo to Fermilab.


  • Coral miles away still show effects years after BP oil spill

    A coral community damaged by the 2010 BP oil spill.Four years after a BP oil rig exploded and flooded the Gulf of Mexico with an estimated 170 million gallons of oil, scientists have discovered further evidence of coral communities affected by this environmental disaster. Scientists at Pennsylvania State University, in State College, Pa., found coral communities that show signs of damage from 2010's Deepwater Horizon oil spill more than 12 miles (20 kilometers) from the disaster site. The new findings suggest that the oil spill's footprint is both deeper and wider than was previously thought. "This study very clearly shows that multiple coral communities, up to 22 kilometers [13.7 miles] from the spill site and at depths over 1,800 meters [5,905 feet], were impacted by the spill," Charles Fischer, a professor of biology at Penn State and co-author of the study, said in a statement.


  • Surf's Up in the Arctic: Record-High Waves Seen in 2012

    Surf's Up in the Arctic: Record-High Waves Seen in 2012Record-high waves hit Alaska's Beaufort Sea in September 2012, when Arctic sea ice shrank to an extreme summer low, a new study reports. The study authors blame shrinking Arctic sea ice for the house-size swells, and predict that waves will grow larger as the Arctic ice pack melts further in future decades. "We have long known that waves are the combined results of winds, time and distance," said lead study author Jim Thomson, an oceanographer with the University of Washington's Applied Physics Laboratory in Seattle. "In the Arctic Ocean, those distances are changing dramatically, and we are now observing the result," Thomson told Live Science in an email interview. The Arctic ice pack grows bigger in the winter and partially melts in the summer.


  • Transparent Bodies: Mice Go See-Through For Science

    Transparent Bodies: Mice Go See-Through For Science"Although the idea of tissue clearing has been around for a century, to our knowledge, this is the first study to perform whole-body clearing, as opposed to first extracting and then clearing organs outside the adult body," study researcher Viviana Gradinaru, a neuroscientist at the California Institute of Technology, in Pasadena, said in a statement. Follow Tanya Lewis on Twitter and Google+.


  • Vintage NASA Spacecraft to Tackle Interplanetary Science

    Vintage NASA Spacecraft to Tackle Interplanetary ScienceA private team is priming a 36-year-old NASA spacecraft to perform new science as it travels through interplanetary space after attempts to move the probe into a position closer to Earth failed. "We're disappointed we couldn't put it in the L-1 orbit, but we had a lot of scientists saying we're more interested in interplanetary space," Keith Cowing, co-leader of the ISEE-3 Reboot Project, told Space.com.


  • Hungarian scientists aim for prototype of cancer surgery device

    Inventor of the Intelligent Knife Zoltan Takats speaks to the media at St Mary's Hospital in LondonBy Krisztina Than BUDAPEST (Reuters) - Hungarian scientists are aiming for the first prototype of a new device in two years that will help surgeons distinguish between healthy tissue and tumours in a split-second as they operate and remove cancerous tissue precisely. Hungarian chemist Zoltan Takats started to work on the technology in 2002 in the United States and from 2004 onwards at the Budapest Semmelweis Medical University in cooperation with the Imperial College London, where he works now. Last week, U.S.-based Waters Corporation acquired the technology - called Rapid Evaporative Ionization Mass Spectrometry (REIMS) - from Hungarian start-up firm MediMass Ltd. Waters said in a July 22 statement on its website that the technology could be used to create the "Intelligent Knife" or "iKnife," a device "in the conceptual stages of development that could potentially be used for real-time diagnostics in surgery".


  • Scientists Closing in on Theory of Consciousness The 17th century French philosopher René Descartes proposed the notion of "cogito ergo sum" ("I think, therefore I am"), the idea that the mere act of thinking about one's existence proves there is someone there to do the thinking. "The only thing you know is, 'I am conscious.' Any theory has to start with that," said Christof Koch, a neuroscientist and the chief scientific officer at the Allen Institute for Neuroscience in Seattle. In the last few decades, neuroscientists have begun to attack the problem of understanding consciousness from an evidence-based perspective. In fact, Koch and Francis Crick, the molecular biologist who famously helped discover the double-helix structure of DNA, had previously hypothesized that this region might integrate information across different parts of the brain, like the conductor of a symphony.
  • No Fukushima radiation in tests off U.S. West Coast: scientists By Courtney Sherwood PORTLAND Ore. (Reuters) - Tests of water off the U.S. West Coast have found no signs of radiation from Japan's 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster, although low levels of radiation are ultimately expected to reach the U.S. shore, scientists said on Tuesday. Results obtained this week in tests of water gathered by an Oregon conservation group and tested by East Coast scientists came in as expected with no Fukushima-linked radiation, and five more tests are planned at six-month intervals to see if radiation levels will climb. "We've seen radiation halfway across the Pacific, north of Hawaii, but in U.S. waters there has been none, yet," Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution senior scientist Ken Buesseler said. Tests of some fish species, which can race across the ocean more quickly than slow-moving currents, have shown higher levels of radiation, although radiation levels in sea life off the U.S. shore are still safe, Buesseler said.
  • Quantum Wonderland: Neutron 'Cheshire Cats' Created

    Quantum Wonderland: Neutron 'Cheshire Cats' CreatedThe Cheshire Cat of the classic children's book "Alice in Wonderland" had a smile that could disconnect from its body. For instance, a particle can apparently exist in two or more places at once or spin two opposite directions at the same time, a property known as superposition. Theoretical physicists last year predicted that the peculiar nature of quantum physics might allow the properties of particles to exist in two or more places simultaneously. This mimics the story of the Cheshire Cat, in which Alice notes, "Well! I've often seen a cat without a grin … but a grin without a cat! It's the most curious thing I ever saw in all my life!"


  • Is Your Life Story Written in Your Poop? In a new experiment, researchers studied gut and saliva bacteria in two people over a year, to investigate how microbial communities in people's bodies, called their microbiota, changed over time. The study participants provided stool and saliva samples nearly every day during the study period, and chronicled their daily health and behavior, including their diet, exercise, bowel movements and mood, using a diary app. The ratio then returned to normal when the study participant returned home, according to the study, led by Lawrence David, an assistant professor at Duke University Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina. In the other study participant, an intestinal infection with Salmonella, resulted in the permanent decline of most gut bacterial types, which were replaced by genetically-similar species, according to the study published today (July 24) in the journal Genome Biology.
  • Scientists to excavate Wyoming cave with trove of Ice Age fossils Scientists will begin excavation early next week of an ancient Wyoming sinkhole containing a rare bounty of fossil remains of prehistoric animals, such as mammoths and dire wolves, preserved in unusually good condition, researchers said on Thursday.    The two-week dig, set to begin next Monday under the direction of Des Moines University paleontologist Julie Meachen, marks the first exploration of Natural Trap Cave in north-central Wyoming since its initial discovery in the 1970s.
  • People Use Just 8.2% of Their DNA, Study Finds More than a decade has passed since the completion of the Human Genome Project, the international collaboration to map all of the "letters" in our DNA. The huge effort led to revolutionary genomic discoveries, but more than 10 years later, it's still unclear what percentage of the human genome is actually doing something important. The results are higher than previous estimates of 3 to 5 percent, and significantly lower than the 80 percent reported in 2012 by the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements Project (ENCODE), a public research project led by the U.S. National Human Genome Research Institute to study the role of the 3 billion total letters in human DNA. The differences may stem from the nuanced definition of "functional DNA," said the study's co-lead researcher Chris Ponting, a professor of genomics at the University of Oxford in England.

Geändert: 10.12.2010 19:40 Uhr

URL: http://www.ego4u.de/de/read-on/newsticker?9