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Politics News Headlines - Yahoo News

Politics News Headlines - Yahoo News

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  • Amid foreign crises, Obama takes solace in U.S. economic turnaround

    Obama delivers remarks at Laborfest 2014 at Maier Festival Park in Milwaukee, WisconsinBy Steve Holland MILWAUKEE (Reuters) - Throughout much of his presidency, Barack Obama has been under siege about the state of the U.S. With his handling of foreign policy under fire in confronting challenges from Ukraine to the Middle East, Obama made a Labor Day trek to Milwaukee's annual Laborfest event to underscore how he feels his leadership on the economy has paid off.


  • Obama notifies Congress of ordering air strikes in Iraq's Amerli

    U.S. President Obama answers questions ahead of national security council meeting at the White House in WashingtonPresident Barack Obama formally notified the U.S. Congress on Monday that he had authorized air strikes and humanitarian airdrops over the weekend in the Iraqi Shi’ite town of Amerli where Islamic State militants had trapped the civilian population. Iraqi security forces backed by Shi'ite militias on Sunday broke the two-month siege of Amerli and entered the northern town after the U.S. Obama said in a letter to congressional leaders he was notifying Congress of his decision under the long-standing War Powers Resolution, which gives presidents authorization for temporary military action.


  • Exclusive: From Seoul to Mexico City, pressure mounts to ease U.S. oil export ban By Valerie Volcovici, Timothy Gardner and Meeyoung Cho WASHINGTON/SEOUL (Reuters) - Washington is facing growing international pressure to ease its long standing ban on crude oil exports, with South Korea and Mexico joining the European Union in pressing the case for U.S. South Korean President Park Geun-hye told a visiting U.S.
  • Florida power utilities fear return of ‘Green Governor' Crist

    Former Florida Governor Charlie Crist greets supporters outside the North Miami Public Library in Miami in this file photoBy David Adams MIAMI (Reuters) - When Charlie Crist last governed Florida, his green energy and climate policies made him few friends among the state's powerful electricity corporations. Now, as the Republican-turned Democrat bids to return to the governor's mansion, it may be payback time. Florida's three largest utilities have poured money into the re-election campaign of Republican incumbent Governor Rick Scott in an expensive and closely watched political battle for the nation's largest swing state. ...


  • Democratic Sen. Chris Murphy expresses ‘extreme degree of skepticism’ about expanding strikes on ISIL to Syria

    U.S. Senator Chris MurphySen. Chris Murphy says he would be “very unlikely” to support expanding America’s military campaign against the brutal ISIL militia from Iraq into neighboring Syria. But the Connecticut Democrat says President Obama must seek explicit authorization from Congress if he decides to widen the conflict.


  • Obama on ISIL: ‘We don’t have a strategy yet’

    President Barack Obama listens in the James Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington, Thursday, Aug. 28, 2014, where he spoke about the economy, Iraq, and Ukraine, before convening a meeting with his national security team on the militant threat in Syria and Iraq. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)Declaring “we don’t have a strategy yet,” President Obama poured cold water Thursday on talk that he was poised to order imminent U.S. military strikes on ISIL fighters in Syria.


  • Obama’s Anti-Doctrine Doctrine Terrorists in Syria and Iraq have been overrunning the countryside, pausing to savagely murder an American journalist. Pakistan is reeling from political crisis. The Russians just made an incursion into Ukraine, the Israelis have been blowing up every other building in Gaza, and Ebola's rampaging through West Africa. All of which has led to some of the most blistering criticism of Barack Obama's presidency.
  • Former Iowa Republican official admits to taking payment for support of Ron Paul’s presidential bid

    In this Dec. 28, 2011, file photo, Iowa State Senator Kent Sorenson speaks at a rally for Republican presidential candidate, Rep. Ron Paul, R-Texas, at the Iowa State Fair Grounds in Des Moines, Iowa. Sorenson resigned from office Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2013, after investigator Mark Weinhardt’s report concluded Sorenson likely broke ethics rules in receiving $7,500 in monthly income from Rep. Michelle Bachmann’s, R-Minn., political action committee and presidential campaign in exchange for working as Bachmann’s state chair in 2011. The state senator received a $25,000 check from a high-ranking official in Ron Paul’s presidential campaign days before ditching Michele Bachmann to support Paul, and eventually received $73,000 in payments that may be linked to Paul’s campaign, the independent investigator has found. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, file)An Iowa state senator who abandoned then-presidential candidate Michele Bachmann to endorse Ron Paul a week before the 2012 Iowa caucuses has pleaded guilty to “concealing payments” from Paul’s campaign in exchange for his support.


  • On Ukraine's 'other side' to the west, fears of familiar crisis brew in tiny Moldova The world may not be ready for another crisis on Ukraine’s borders, but one may be brewing — this time on the west, in the obscure Moldovan province of Transnistria, occupying about 1,600 square miles between the Dniester River and the Ukrainian frontier.
  • Ferguson Police Receive Body Camera Donation

    Ferguson Police Receive Body Camera DonationOne in Six U.S. Police Departments Use Body Cameras


  • ISIS Turning Old Enemies into Awkward Allies

    ISIS Turning Old Enemies into Awkward AlliesUS Attacks Joined With Militia Advised by Iran


  • 5 International Stories You'll Care About Next Week

    5 International Stories You'll Care About Next WeekPresident Obama Visits Wales for NATO Summit


  • McDaniel delays announcement on election lawsuit JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Mississippi state Sen. Chris McDaniel will take at least one extra day to decide whether to try to revive his lawsuit that challenged his Republican primary loss to Sen. Thad Cochran.
  • US helicopter crashes in Gulf of Aden; all rescued WASHINGTON (AP) — A Marine Corps helicopter with 25 aboard crashed Monday in the Gulf of Aden, and all aboard were rescued, the Navy said.
  • Obama notifies Congress of airstrikes in Iraq

    Obama delivers remarks at Laborfest 2014 at Maier Festival Park in Milwaukee, WisconsinWASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama has sent official notification to Congress of his order for last week's airstrikes and humanitarian aid drops to help Iraqis threatened by Islamic State militants.


  • Will traffic deaths rise as states legalize pot?

    FILE - This Oct. 8, 2012 file photo shows the wrecked Subaru Impreza in which four people died as it is loaded onto a flatbed truck on the Southern State Parkway in West Hempstead, N.Y., after and early-morning accident. At the wheel was a New York teenager, Joseph Beer, who had smoked about $20 worth of marijuana, before getting into the car with four friends, and driving over 100 mph before crashing into trees with such force that it split the car in half. As states liberalize their marijuana laws, public officials and safety advocates worry that more drivers high on pot will lead to a spike in traffic deaths. Researchers who have studied the issue, though, are divided over whether toking before taking the wheel in fact leads to more accidents. (AP Photo/Frank Eltman, File)WASHINGTON (AP) — As states liberalize their marijuana laws, public officials and safety advocates worry that more drivers high on pot will lead to a big increase in traffic deaths. Researchers, though, are divided on the question.


  • Surly 2014 electorate poised to 'keep the bums in'

    This Oct. 2, 2013, file photo shows Vicki Maturo, of Culver City, Calif., as she protests against the government shutdown outside the federal building in Los Angeles. The election of 2014 is an election of contradictions. A surly electorate holds President Barack Obama in low regard and gives Congress even worse marks, yet for all their anger, a historic few are motivated enough to vote and those that do are poised to "keep the bums in." (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)WASHINGTON (AP) — A surly electorate that holds Congress in even lower regard than unpopular President Barack Obama is willing to "keep the bums in," with at least 365 incumbents in the 435-member House and 18 of 28 senators on a glide path to another term when ballots are counted Nov. 4.


  • Enforcement of gun laws hinges on local sheriffs' interpretation of Second Amendment Rural sheriffs across the country are by protesting gun control laws
  • How big telecom smothers city-run broadband Municipal broadband boosts business, but often stops at city limits thanks to lobbying muscle of telecom giants
  • Fearing for the Second Amendment, militia groups grow in number Fear of interference with Second Amendment rights and suspicion of elected officials have provoked a rise in self-described patriot militias
  • Second poll shows jump in support for Scottish independence

    Pro-independence stickers are distributed by supporters outside the Birnam Highland Games in Perthshire, Scotland, on August 30, 2014A second poll showed support for Scottish independence rising less than three weeks from the historic referendum, more than halving the lead of the anti-independence camp on Monday. The YouGov poll found 47 percent of respondents would vote "Yes" to independence, compared to 53 percent who would vote "No", excluding "undecideds". The results were identical to a Friday poll by Survation, which had showed the "Yes" campaign had gained ground after a strong performance from pro-independence leader Alex Salmond in a TV debate. The gap in support between the two camps more than halved to six points from a 14-point "No" camp lead in a YouGov poll in mid-August.


  • Iran aiming for nuclear accord, says foreign minister

    Outgoing European Union Council president Herman Van Rompuy (C), Iran's Foreign Minister Javad Zarif (L) and EU foreign affairs chief Catherine Ashton (R) meet on September 1, 2014 at the EU headquarters in BrusselsIranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif said he had "good discussions" Monday with EU foreign affairs chief Catherine Ashton and Tehran was committed to an accord over its contested nuclear programme. Iran wants progress on the issue, Zarif was cited as saying by the Belga state news agency after a meeting with Belgian Foreign Minister Didier Reynders. He said he was "fairly optimistic" after talks earlier with Ashton that Iran and the five permanent UN Security Council members -- Britain, China, France, Russia and the United States -- plus Germany could reach a deal on Tehran's nuclear programme by a November deadline.


  • British activist set for Thai defamation trial

    A worker checks a pineapple at a market in Bangkok on June 15, 2009A British activist is set to face a defamation charge in a Bangkok court Tuesday stemming from a report he co-authored on alleged labour abuses in Thailand's food industry. Andy Hall, 34, faces civil and criminal lawsuits submitted by Thai fruit processor Natural Fruit, after his report levelled accusations of forced and child labour, unlawfully low wages and long hours at one of its factories. Natural Fruit is a major supplier to the European drink market and leading European food companies have urged the company to drop its legal action. Defamation is a criminal offence in Thailand and Hall, who has had his passport confiscated by Thai authorities pending the trial, could be jailed for up to a year if found guilty.


  • US urges Israel to reverse Palestinian land-grab plan

    The United States urges Israel to reverse its latest plan to seize Palestinian land in the Bethlehem area of the occupied West BankIsrael faced increasing pressure Monday, including from the United States, after saying it plans to expropriate 400 hectares (988 acres) of Palestinian land in the Bethlehem area in the south of the occupied West Bank. Ally Washington, the United Nations and Egypt all called for an urgent rethink after Sunday's announcement, which angered the Palestinians and alarmed Israeli peace campaigners, and comes days after a long-term ceasefire between Israel and the Palestinians took hold. "This announcement, like every other settlement announcement Israel makes, planning step they approve, and construction tender they issue, is counterproductive to Israel's stated goal of a negotiated two-state solution with the Palestinians," a US State Department official said.


  • Rebels say no to Colombian military role in peace

    Commander of the FARC-EP leftist guerrillas, Ivan Marquez (L), reads a statement next to commander Jesus Santrich, at the Convention Palace in Havana, as peace talks with the Colombian government resume on September 1, 2014Leftist FARC guerrillas in peace talks aimed at ending a five-decade conflict rejected Monday a Colombian plan to put the military in charge of disarming the rebels. "There is no way" that the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia will accept a military role "to resolve issues that are of political nature by definition," top rebel negotiator Ivan Marquez told reporters. Marquez spoke in the Cuban capital Havana, where peace talks began in November 2012 even though hostilities have continued in the absence of a ceasefire. President Juan Manuel Santos said Friday that he would put Colombia's top general, Javier Florez, in charge of a military operation to demobilize and disarm the guerrillas.


  • Pakistan anti-PM protesters storm state TV

    Pakistani supporters of Canadian cleric Tahir ul Qadri sit on the lawn at the Parliament premises following clashes with police in Islamabad on August 31, 2014Hundreds of protesters trying to topple Pakistan's government briefly seized the state broadcaster on Monday, intensifying the fortnight-long political crisis that has gripped the nuclear-armed nation. Defence minister Khawaja Asif told AFP a cross-party negotiation team was set to approach opposition groups, in a bid to end a standoff that has seen three killed and hundreds injured in clashes between police and anti-government protesters. Transmissions of the main Pakistani Television (PTV) news channel were cut after protesters armed with clubs stormed the building in Islamabad's high-security "red zone".


  • Uruguay denies cold feet on taking Guantanamo detainees

    Uruguay denies that it had delayed taking in six detainees from the US military prison at Guantanamo, saying no date for the transfer had been set yetUruguay denied Monday that it had delayed taking in six detainees from the US military prison at Guantanamo, saying no date for the transfer had been set yet. Uruguayan President Jose Mujica announced in March that his country had agreed to take detainees from the prison on human rights grounds, helping his US counterpart Barack Obama fulfill his long-delayed promise to close the controversial jail. Diego Canepa, an assistant secretary in Mujica's office, denied the report, which cited Obama administration officials. He also denied the newspaper's claim that US Vice President Joe Biden had called Mujica in August "pressing him to resettle the men."


  • Kiev warns of 'great war' with Russia as its forces retreat

    Villagers walk by an abandoned checkpoint in Olenivka on September 1, 2014Ukrainian forces ceded a strategic eastern airport to pro-Russian insurgents on Monday as the government in Kiev accused Moscow of launching a "great war" that could claim tens of thousands of lives. The sense of foreboding in Kiev came as European-mediated talks over the fast-escalating crisis opened behind closed doors in the Belarussian capital Minsk, attended by government, separatist and Russian envoys. The rebels have launched a major counteroffensive in recent days that the Ukrainian government and its Western allies claim is backed by Russian forces -- a charge Moscow denies. Ukraine's Defence Minister Valeriy Geletey vowed on Monday to "immediately mount defences against Russia, which is trying not only to secure positions held by terrorists before but to advance on other territories of Ukraine".


  • Police begin wearing cameras in US protest town

    Demonstrators protest outside the Ferguson, Missouri, Police Department during the National March on Ferguson, August 30, 2014Police in the US town roiled by protests after the fatal shooting of an unarmed black teenager are now wearing body cameras in a bid to calm local anger, a news report said. More than 1,000 protesters again marched Saturday in the town of Ferguson, Missouri, over the August 9 killing of Michael Brown, 18, at the hands of a white police officer. Ferguson police began wearing the cameras on Saturday, according to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, quoting the town's police chief Tom Jackson as saying the force -- which is overwhelmingly white -- was donated about 50 body cameras by two companies.


  • Hamas boosted politically despite battlefield losses: analysts

    A Palestinian supporter of the Islamist movement Hamas gestures during a rally in the West Bank city of Ramallah on August 30, 2014Gaza's Islamist Hamas movement may have suffered heavy military losses during 50 days of conflict with Israel but it emerged with its political standing enhanced, analysts say. After the ceasefire last week between Israel and Palestinian militant groups in Gaza, Hamas leaders celebrated "victory" to the cheers of crowds across the enclave it rules. Hamas leaders raised the prospect of opening up Gaza to the world, winning the applause of crowds keen to see an end to Israel's crippling blockade of the territory, in place since 2006.


  • With rebels at the door, Ukrainian children start school

    Parents look through the door of a classroom where children attend their first class at a school in Volnovakha on September 1, 2014Volnovakha (Ukraine) (AFP) - "What are the first words of the Ukrainian anthem?" teacher Yulia Likhoshva asks her students. It is Monday, the first day back at school for children across the country, and Likhoshva is kicking things off with a patriotic lesson on "United Ukraine." Authorities say 20,000 children began this school year far away from home, having been displaced from conflict-torn eastern towns or moved from the Crimean peninsula which Moscow annexed in March. Here in Volnovakha, more than 1,000 such children enrolled ahead of the first day back, according to the town's head of education, Valentina Baltsa.


  • Ukraine tension sparks questions over French warship sale to Russia

    A picture taken on July 15, 2014 in Saint-Nazaire shows part of the Sevastopol ship, a Mistral class LHD amphibious vesselFresh tensions with Russia over Ukraine have sparked renewed agonising in France about the sale of two Mistral-class warships to Moscow that has already drawn sharp criticism from London and Washington. France agreed in 2011 to build and sell the two advanced helicopter assault ships to Russia for a total of 1.2 billion euros ($1.6 billion) with the first scheduled for delivery in October or November and the second in 2015.


  • Lesotho PM heading home after 'coup'

    A man stands next to a newspaper ad in Maseru on August 31, 2014Lesotho's exiled prime minister is heading home, an aide told AFP on Monday, as regional mediators sought to reinstall him to power days after an apparent coup. "We are going home now, most probably we will be in Lesotho tomorrow," Samonyane Ntsekele, an advisor to Prime Minister Tom Thabane, said from Pretoria, where southern African states brokered a deal to end the crisis. The military and a rival political party -- the Lesotho Congress for Democracy (LCD) -- have been accused of trying to oust the 75-year-old, a charge they vehemently deny. South African president Jacob Zuma and representatives from governments in the regional bloc SADC had brought together leaders from Lesotho's three ruling coalition parties to resolve their differences.


  • Fidel Castro compares NATO to Nazis, lashes out at US

    Handout picture released by cubadebate.cu website shows Cuban leader and former president Fidel Castro (L) sitting next to his brother and current president, Raul, in Havana on February 24, 2013Cuban ex-president Fidel Castro lashed out at the United States and Europe on Monday, accusing them of war-mongering and comparing the NATO military alliance's representatives to the Nazi SS. In a tortuous column published in Cuban state media, the father of the island's communist revolution also attacked US Senator John McCain over United States policy in the Middle East, calling him "Israel's most unconditional ally."


  • Israel plan to seize West Bank land 'alarms' UN's Ban

    The Israeli West Bank settlement of Efrat on September 1, 2014UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon is "alarmed" by Israeli plans to expropriate 400 hectares (988 acres) of Palestinian land in the Bethlehem area in the south of the occupied West Bank, his spokesman said Monday. Israel announced the move on Sunday, the army saying the step stemmed from political decisions taken after the June killing of three Israeli teenagers snatched from a roadside in the same area, known to Israelis as Gush Etzion settlement bloc. "The seizure of such a large swathe of land risks paving the way for further settlement activity, which -– as the United Nations has reiterated on many occasions -– is illegal under international law and runs totally counter to the pursuit of a two-state solution. "The secretary-general calls on Israel to heed the calls of the international community to refrain from settlement activity and abide by its commitments under international law and the Quartet Road Map."


  • Iraqi forces on offensive after breaking jihadist siege Iraqi troops, Kurdish fighters and Shiite militiamen backed by US air strikes pressed a fightback against jihadist-led militants Monday, buoyed by breaking a weeks-long siege of a Shiite town. The military gains came as a senior UN rights official said the Islamic State (IS) jihadist group has carried out "acts of inhumanity on an unimaginable scale" in Iraq, and caretaker premier Nuri al-Maliki vowed the country would be the group's "graveyard". The breakthrough at Amerli on Sunday was the biggest offensive success for the Iraqi government since IS-led militants overran much of the Sunni Arab heartland north and west of Baghdad in June. The United States carried out limited air strikes in the area during the operation, the first time it has expanded its more than three-week air campaign against IS beyond north Iraq.
  • IS fears make Gulf monarchies set aside differences

    Islamic fighters from the Al-Nusra Front wave their movement's flag as they parade at the Yarmuk Palestinian refugee camp, south of Damascus on July 28, 2014Advances by jihadists in Syria and Iraq, and US calls for a coalition against them have made Gulf monarchies set aside disputes over Qatar's support for the Muslim Brotherhood, analysts say. Wary of spectacular gains made by Islamic State jihadists, the oil-rich monarchies fear the militants could advance towards their own borders, where the extreme ideologies could find support. "The biggest danger (in the Gulf) comes now from these (emerging) terrorist groups, and not from the Muslim Brotherhood," said Abdulaziz Sager, head of the Gulf Research Centre think-tank.


  • Gabon education minister resigns over exam row

    Students check lists on October 8, 2007 at a high school in the capital Libreville during the opening of the school yearGabon's education minister has resigned due to a scandal after hundreds of students failed the country's high-school exams, local media reported on Monday. Prime Minister Daniel Ona Ondo "acknowledges the resignation of the Minister of Education and Technical Education, Leon Nzouba," said government spokeswoman Denise Mekamne. He was heavily criticised for his handling of a dispute involving 900 students who were deemed to have failed their high-school exams but who challenged their grades. The former minister was pictured in August on his knees in front of protesting students, an image that made the rounds on social media and sparked public ridicule for Nzouba.


  • Exodus from Hasakeh as Syria hunts jihadists

    A fighter of the Committees for the Protection of the Kurdish People looks through binoculars behind sand bags on October 19, 2013 in Derik, in the northeastern Hasakeh governorate on the border with Turkey and IraqRaids by Syrian forces hunting suspected Islamic State infiltrators in the northeast town of Hasakeh have sparked an exodus of more than 60,000 civilians in three days, a monitor said Monday. Hasakeh is split between zones controlled by President Bashar al-Assad's forces, Kurdish groups and militants from the radical IS group, which is sowing terror in both Syria and neighbouring Iraq. "No fewer than 60,000 residents have fled Hasakeh's Ghuiran district since Friday, after air raids by regime forces," the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said. "The regime claims there are IS fighters in the neighbourhood, and that's why they are bombarding it," its chief Rami Abdel Rahman said.


  • Anger over $40m jet for president of impoverished Niger

    Niger President Issoufou Mahamadou arrives at the White House during the US Africa Leaders Summit on August 5, 2014 in Washington, DCThe government of Niger, one of the poorest countries in the world, has provoked anger with the purchase of a $40 million (30 million euros) presidential jet. The country's Defence Minister Karidjo Mahamadou confirmed the deal on Monday, saying it would help improve the "influence of our illustrious republic". The plane it is replacing -- also a Boeing 737 -- was bought in the 1970s by the country's former president Seyni Kountche.


Geändert: 10.12.2010 19:40 Uhr

URL: http://www.ego4u.de/de/read-on/newsticker?5